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I don't want to throw up!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Looking for food safety opinions please; here is the scenario:
Followed a recipe that told me to marinate pork, chicken, and shrimp. I have done so and now they are in a tightly sealed container in the fridge.
My question: when I was a teen I used to clean the fridges at various restaurants. I remember the meats always marinating individually and wondered why. Is this a cross contamination potential, a flavor issue, allergy precaution, or just in case customers want to mix and match various meats?

I hope to not throw the food out, so if someone in the restaurant industry can tell me if this is allowed it would really help me out. I would think that even though I combined the meats I will be cooking off most of the nasties... What would you do?

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 11

Yikes.  You put chicken pork and shrimp all in one container?  You're going to have some shrimpy tasting chicken and pork lol.  Yes there a danger here as they all need different cooking temperatures for optimum texture.  You will have to overcook your shrimp.

 

Don't do that again, you won't throw up if you cook everything well but overall this is a very bad decision to marinate everything together.  I'd be more upset about the proteins all tasting like eachother.  

 

This happened to me at a restaurant recently.  I ordered a chicken kabob at a turkish restaurant and when I ate it I could tell it had been marinating with the the lamb kabobs.  Not going there again.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Yikes.  You put chicken pork and shrimp all in one container?  You're going to have some shrimpy tasting chicken and pork lol.  Yes there a danger here as they all need different cooking temperatures for optimum texture.  You will have to overcook your shrimp.

Don't do that again, you won't throw up if you cook everything well but overall this is a very bad decision to marinate everything together.  I'd be more upset about the proteins all tasting like eachother.  

This happened to me at a restaurant recently.  I ordered a chicken kabob at a turkish restaurant and when I ate it I could tell it had been marinating with the the lamb kabobs.  Not going there again.
Thanks for the reply! I didn't tell the whole story, which is that even though the recipe called for it, I opted out of the shrimp at the last minute. If at worst my concern is that my chicken tastes like pork, then I'm content lol.

The recipe I used came from an old school Chinese cookbook. I have made it before with fantastic results but always separated everything because some of the steps (including the marinade) seem vague and maybe even translated.

If people think the pork and chicken are safe I will separate them so the cooking time is on spot and then shrimpify it near the end without marinade.

PS would LOVE to make my chicken taste like lamb. Cheaper way to get my fix.(;
post #4 of 11
Everything koukouvagia posted is true, do you have a link to this recipe, it seems nuts. Splitting the marinade would work, maybe? Is it a stir fry? Gotta admit my stomach turned a bit on this post.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewOrleansCookJ View Post

Everything koukouvagia posted is true, do you have a link to this recipe, it seems nuts. Splitting the marinade would work, maybe? Is it a stir fry? Gotta admit my stomach turned a bit on this post.

Hi! Thanks for replying. As mentioned, this is from an old school chinese cookbook. No link to offer, but the way it read was to put all meats together and marinate. It was trying to simplify special chow mein in 4 easy steps, so I either misunderstood or it was poorly translated into English or both. I don't have a problem with meats combining flavors because I'm only cooking for myself, I just didn't want a poison situation. All the flavors are going to be stir fried together anyway.
post #6 of 11
Yeah sorry, that follow up post came through as I was sending mine. Makes much more sense knowing its a stir fried dish. That being said, I'm now curious about how marinades with different types of proteins are handled in prep for a composed dish like lo mien. I've never worked in a professional Chinese kitchen, but I imagine that they would separate the proteins before marinating especially due to shellfish allergies.
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewOrleansCookJ View Post

Yeah sorry, that follow up post came through as I was sending mine. Makes much more sense knowing its a stir fried dish. That being said, I'm now curious about how marinades with different types of proteins are handled in prep for a composed dish like lo mien. I've never worked in a professional Chinese kitchen, but I imagine that they would separate the proteins before marinating especially due to shellfish allergies.
Apologies here as well. I didn't think to mention it was a fried dish. It is actually a really good recipe as I have used it in the past, but never followed it as closely as I did this time. All my search queries in google make it look like I shouldn't have necessarily marinaded anything at all. I agree it would be great to hear from someone more in the know about stir frying methods. What would you do aside from separating the proteins? Marinade or not? Also, chicken cubes or stock?
Edited by Pepper Grind - 12/14/15 at 5:44pm
post #8 of 11

Well Pepper Grind, you've just been introduced to a new life experience.

 

Not all recipes are created equal.  There are a multitude of cookbooks out there that shouldn't be.

 

As professionals, we see this all the time in recipes.

 

I agree that marinating the proteins separately is the way to go about the recipe.

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

Well Pepper Grind, you've just been introduced to a new life experience.

Not all recipes are created equal.  There are a multitude of cookbooks out there that shouldn't be.

As professionals, we see this all the time in recipes.

I agree that marinating the proteins separately is the way to go about the recipe.
Yeah, live and learn I suppose. I was just happy knowing I wasn't going to die. Luckily, my palate wasn't discerning enough to notice much difference comparably to the other times when I bothered to go the extra mile and seperate. I still found it quite tasty as usual, but would definitely never serve it to others based on the feedback here. I guess I'm just not a picky enough eater, and that worked in my favor this time lol.

Thank you for lending your time to respond. I really do think perhaps I misread the recipe. Everything else I've attempted in that cookbook has been a winner, and managed me some pretty cheap and quick dinners since I was 18.
post #10 of 11

Don't mean to be the dissenter of the group. . . but. . . 

 

A few questions : Are the proteins cut approx. the same size? If they are, or at least slices of pork and chicken @ 1/8 - 1/4" thk, it will stir fry in the same time the shrimp will. Cooking time is irrelevant. 

 

Are you using a wok at very high temp? If you are, then the "nasties" aren't a problem at all. 

 

As far as taste. What cuts of pork and chicken? I assume you are using chicken breast and probably chops? 

 

I personally don't find it to be a problem marinating all together.

 

For how long? 30 minutes or 8 hours? What is the marinade? Are you using the marinade as an ingredient additive in the stir fry? Is there either fish sauce or oyster sauce being used? Soy? Dried shrimp or shrimp paste? If the sauce is going to cover all proteins, any homogenization of flavors during the marinade won't matter much, especially if you are using shellfish based sauces. The difference between eating shrimp and pork should be unmistakable, especially in texture, but depends on the cut. Chicken breast usually assumes the flavors of the stronger ingredients in stir fry's or is mild, unless you are using chicken fat somewhere in the preparation.  Using fish based sauces or condiments is very common, so the cross flavorization (Is that a word?) occurs all the time. i.e. eating pork with a "fishy" sauce or ingredient. You would think a fish ball in a soup with roasted pork would overwhelm, but it doesn't. 

 

The only problem I see is for shellfish allergies. However, if this is a "Chinese cooking at home" recipe book, then I'm guessing anybody with allergies would simply omit the shellfish. A commercial kitchen would be something else entirely - should be separated

post #11 of 11
Hi ya Pepper. When it comes to marinade re chicken, some say dump it, and others say boil it. Personally, I think there has been too much of a fuss made over same. I have only gotten ill from local restaurants that serve yellow broccoli and stale food. I first started with a simple Kikkoman booklet, and never had a problem.
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