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Knives...lets get started..... - Page 3

post #61 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Hammering out as you put it isn't probably the only option. When carbon steel got severely out of true you better abrade it while thinning. Eventually you put a more conservative edge on it.
The Wüsthof is the most interesting here. Handle seems intact, and with a bit of love you get a great performer. I had the privilege to do so with a few vintage carbons and never regret the time it took. And this one seems to be in quite a good condition.

I just need to find the time to do it and ask ask a lot of questions before I start that process.
Mike
post #62 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojak View Post

I just need to find the time to do it and ask ask a lot of questions before I start that process.
Mike
Looking forward to those questions. Believe me, it isn't that hard. Especially not with carbon steel.
post #63 of 85

And here is what just came in the mail today for me, a 210 Takamura Migake R2 gyuto, one of the "next best" knives performance wise to an Ironwood.  OTB it has an edge better than I can put on any knife I own, and visually examining the edge I can see it can be improve on.  This is actually an interim knife to keep me happy until I can find/decide o the perfect [for me] 240 suji, and I just wanted to have a knife in R2 anyways.

 

My only complaint, it is not as thin at the tip as knives I have reworked, but I'll try it as-is before a decide about changing that as I have no complaints about the rest of the edge.

 

 

post #64 of 85
Thread Starter 
Rick,
Dang that's Purdy! Rosewood?

Do you feel it will have more resistance or wedge with the slightly thicker tip when using it in that capacity or is it a blade balance thing.
Mike...
post #65 of 85

I'm not 100% sure but I think the scales are actually synthetic laminate, which can be made to look a lot like real wood.  There is something about the color, grain size and sheen that does not seem completely natural, but it is attractive never the less.   It's definitely not in the same class as an Ironwwod though.

 

As for the tip, it's probably in line with a lot of other lasers, and I've seen these doing horizontal cuts thru onions like they weren't even there.  Just noting that I have modified knives to even finer distal taper up front and that certainly doesn't hurt them.  The very tip itself is as thin as you'd want it, I would just have had the taper continue further back than it does.

 

And despite the fact the blade is very light I actually would enjoy even more weight off the tip.  You know, it's similar to the feel you go for when you put a 700C sew-up on the front of your bicycle, or add a touch more toe-out to the front end of a sports car.  Ahahah!, then you really feel like you've got the light response of a race machine there.

 

 

Rick

post #66 of 85
Thread Starter 
Well it sure is nice Rick! Enjoy! And Merry Christmas.
post #67 of 85

Common Mike ;) we (I) need some feedback on those Takaka's :)

post #68 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonesetter View Post

Common Mike wink.gif we (I) need some feedback on those Takaka's smile.gif

They are sharp as hell..a slight mishap between my brain and hand resulted in a gushing wound....LOL! Honestly, the onion test....effortless.....the Tanaka's are great tools....oh and yes while my Shun's came extremely sharp the Tanaka's are heads and tails above. Myth, handles are to small....uh no! I have giant hands and the Tanaka Handle gives me a confident grip. Myth Busted!.Would I buy, again, you bet I would....

Mike
post #69 of 85

Wow, that sounds sharp :)

 

Another question for you - does the profile favour any particular action/technique? So (keep in mind I am very much a novice here but wanting to learn) to my eyes profile is not too flat, to encourage chopping but has a some curve to enable rocking?

 

Is this fair to say?

 

Thanks Mike

post #70 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonesetter View Post

Wow, that sounds sharp smile.gif

Another question for you - does the profile favour any particular action/technique? So (keep in mind I am very much a novice here but wanting to learn) to my eyes profile is not too flat, to encourage chopping but has a some curve to enable rocking?

Is this fair to say?

Thanks Mike

I have always thought the German profile encouraged an exaggerated rocking height and I feel this is an uncomfortable movement for me. When rocking using a pinch grip you just need to go high enough to clear whatever your chopping or mincing. The French profile seems to provide me a bit of a guide on how high I need to go. I think it much faster as well not being an expert at cooking knife skills. A true professional probably has the muscle memory to use either profile efficiently. Hope this helps....

Mike
post #71 of 85
I always found that the thickness of the item being cut or chopped to be the guide for how high the knife must be lifted or rocked, not the shape of the knife itself. One doesn't have to always rock a German profile knife to the tip if the food doesn't require that motion. For me, the French and Japanese profiles limit chopping comfort sometimes because it takes more exertion to lift and chop than rock and chop. I choose which knife to use largely based on the task, but find German profile most versatile simply because I ca chop at either a shallow angle or a high angle. Personal preference, and training to some extent, is the most important deciding factor!
post #72 of 85
post #73 of 85
Modern French have the tip a bit higher than the old ones. Old Germans have the tip lower than today's Wüsthof. In general, Japanese tips are the same as old French or lower. Has all to do with users' size! I'm a short guy and a modern German tip is perfectly unusable to me. I should add that rock-choppers prefer higher tips and that a high tip is more critical with a relatively short blade.
post #74 of 85

That is also a function of your counter height and cutting board thickness.  I have a 3"x20"x20" block that is too high on the counter, but perfect height on my dining table.

 

Also consider how you are standing in relation to your product.  You have two options for a more "natural" cutting experience

1) Stand both feet square to your board cut across the board diagonally

2) The better option -  Stand with your right foot back and you can place the food you're cutting parallel with the cutting board.  It's better because of board management reasons.  Obviously if you are left handed you stand with your left food back instead

post #75 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

I always found that the thickness of the item being cut or chopped to be the guide for how high the knife must be lifted or rocked, not the shape of the knife itself. One doesn't have to always rock a German profile knife to the tip if the food doesn't require that motion. For me, the French and Japanese profiles limit chopping comfort sometimes because it takes more exertion to lift and chop than rock and chop. I choose which knife to use largely based on the task, but find German profile most versatile simply because I ca chop at either a shallow angle or a high angle. Personal preference, and training to some extent, is the most important deciding factor!


Yes, you are correct Brian. I guess for for a non professional like myself, I feel that the French knife profile helps me be more efficient while rocking because I don't have the training you do. That little bit of higher resistance I feel at the top of the rocking motion lets me know when I've gone as high as I should go. Of course yes food thickness is a major factor, I almost always have pre-broken down what I am rocking to alt least a course chop giving me some uniformity of food thickness. Using the right tool for the he job absolutely a must and I probably abuse that rule a fair bit. I've noticed though with my ham fisted technique that I am a bit slower with the German profile.

Mike
post #76 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Modern French have the tip a bit higher than the old ones. Old Germans have the tip lower than today's Wüsthof. In general, Japanese tips are the same as old French or lower. Has all to do with users' size! I'm a short guy and a modern German tip is perfectly unusable to me. I should add that rock-choppers prefer higher tips and that a high tip is more critical with a relatively short blade.

I can relate! User size, counter height, and cutting board thickness all contribute to the ergonomics of using a knife. I'd add "ham-fistedness" too but some I have no personal experience I'll refrain. smile.gif
post #77 of 85
Hey Mike... There are only 10 rules that weren't intended to be abused or broken! Even the laws of physics are potentially abusable
post #78 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post

That is also a function of your counter height and cutting board thickness.  I have a 3"x20"x20" block that is too high on the counter, but perfect height on my dining table.

Also consider how you are standing in relation to your product.  You have two options for a more "natural" cutting experience
1) Stand both feet square to your board cut across the board diagonally
2) The better option -  Stand with your right foot back and you can place the food you're cutting parallel with the cutting board.  It's better because of board management reasons.  Obviously if you are left handed you stand with your left food back instead

Need to get a better cutting board, I've been looking and found something I liked but the company just sold to a fella in Texas that had lots of complaints so I'm unsure of where or whom to buy from. Not sure how I will change counter height on a leased home. Not at all comfortable prepping on a 125 year old antique dinning table which is my only other option.....

Mike
post #79 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Hey Mike... There are only 10 rules that weren't intended to be abused or broken! Even the laws of physics are potentially abusable

LOL!
post #80 of 85

Since owning decent sharp J-knives, my technique has evolved to include more chopping.

 

The Geramn profile I think favours a duller edge as it's easy to use more heft

 

If I'm prepping stir fry which I do often, I'll reach for the kono laser HD and fly through stuff chopping away, which to me is the fastest (and more fun) option

post #81 of 85

The end grain "butcher block" types are always real thick like 2-3" on top of your counter height.  If you like your current counter height, then get a shorter board.  I only use my block for vegetables.  I'm a fan of synthetics for clean up on meats and anything wet.  I have this one from Korin  http://korin.com/HiSoft-Cutting-Board?sc=26&category=17860376 

 

Sani tuff is thinner, harder, and denser.  http://www.amazon.com/Sani-Tuff-Cutting-Board-Thick-Wx12/dp/B00B693VDM Either one is good on knife edges.

 

As far as techniques, ergonomics, etc.  You need to figure out what works for you.  Since you're cooking at home you have all the time in the world.  You'll find naturally that your grip is not as tight on nice sharp knives, so you'll need to adjust to that.  Your priorities in learning should be 1) Safety 2) consistent cut product sizes 3) speed .   Speed is last and it only comes with practice

post #82 of 85
Thread Starter 
Cutting Board Companies I should be considering?

Thanks,

Mike
post #83 of 85

See the synthetics I mentioned

 

If you want wood, this is good price/performance  http://www.amazon.com/Maple-End-Grain-Chopping-Block/dp/B00O4CQIL0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1451585586&sr=8-1&keywords=michigan+maple

 

Denser maple grown up north has a tighter grain structure,  bigger pieces, less glue

 

Boardsmith is the best even though the company was sold to another wood worker.  Just way too much $ for me

post #84 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post

See the synthetics I mentioned

If you want wood, this is good price/performance  http://www.amazon.com/Maple-End-Grain-Chopping-Block/dp/B00O4CQIL0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1451585586&sr=8-1&keywords=michigan+maple

Denser maple grown up north has a tighter grain structure,  bigger pieces, less glue

Boardsmith is the best even though the company was sold to another wood worker.  Just way too much $ for me

Yes, Boardsmith was what I was looking at. I think I'll pickup the Korin you linked as well.
post #85 of 85
Also look into JK Adams boards.
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