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Herring

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I have never purchased or used herring before today. Randomly walking through a market, I noticed an older gentleman purchasing them. This caught my eye as they were really fresh looking and only $7/kg CDN. I ended up purchasing 3 kg as a start for my first herring experience. Pickled herring has been on my radar for a few months now and why not try it today. I processed just over 2kg's for this and the remaining I researched a recipe for baking in the oven which was for dinner tonight.

The herring for pickling are on in the picture below:


And here are the ones ready for the oven.


The ones for pickling are in salt water brine overnight. The oven ones were awesome. The leftover oil in the bottom of the pan was mopped up with bread. Not a drop was left over.

Talking to the fish monger, this was probably their last of the season as the season is just closing here. Hopefully i'll be able to find them once more.

Any favorite recipe's or preparation of them. Thanks
post #2 of 11

I remember some fantastic pickled herrings, the variety with sour cream. Here's a recipe:

 

http://food52.com/recipes/31602-pickled-herring-with-sour-cream-and-onion

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #3 of 11
Tis the season for sill here in Sweden right now.

I make a nice pickling base with 1 part vinigar 12%, 2 parts sugar, 3 parts water, bay leaves, peppercorns, couple chilis, mustard seeds, onion with skin. Boil and cool. Sit in the fish a couple days and the strain the mix. I use it as a base for vinigar based sill( the strained liquid) and the fish for all sills

3 I made yesterday for Christmas this year are

Horseradish with creme fraish. Micro plane the horse radish, add to creme fraish and sill. Black pepper and sea salt

Lingon and juniper berry. Base with whole and finally ground juniper, sugared lingonberry, add sill and hit it with a dash og bombay sapphire.

Mustard, honey and fresh dill with a bit of the base. I use a very stong hot mustard that is also sweet, vastervik, don't know it's equivalent in Canada.

There are literally countless variations made here in Swede land😀
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Lagom, those recipes sound awesome. I will definitely be trying all of them.

 

I followed a recipe of 1 part vinegar to 1/2 part water to 1/4 part sugar. To the pickling base I added all spice, mustard seed, bay leaf, peppercorns and cloves. I then added some slices of red onion and lemon to the jars. Here is the finished product. A little upset I only have three jars.

I also ran out of 78mm screen bands for the large jar so I had to wrap a lid with plastic wrap.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Lagom or Ordo, do you guys do anything with the roe? This being my first time I quickly came across the idea of salt packing the roe and storing it in the fridge or cellar to use later. When you are ready to use you soak it in water multiple times to get rid of all the salt. When ready you bread and fry it. I was wondering if either of you have any ideas for the roe or recipes?

post #6 of 11

I used to fry roe the few times i could get it. That way is too much fishy to  my palate. May be there's some way to soften it. Thinking tempura here, as recommended by Nigel Slater. But i've almost no experience with roe.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #7 of 11
I normally just buy herring at the market and eat there and then. Just hold by the tail, pull through some onions and eat.
That at least is the herring I am used to (can't help it, I am Dutch). We would call it maatjes haring.

The other form is pickled and wrapped around gherkin (rolmops).

Or as gaffelbiter, a more Scandinavian preparation. I like it a lot and remember seeing it in Denmark at the butcheries on the counter in big plastic bowls.

Bokking is the fried herring and then there is the kipper.

But I never made any of the above from scratch

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post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingNothing View Post

Lagom or Ordo, do you guys do anything with the roe? This being my first time I quickly came across the idea of salt packing the roe and storing it in the fridge or cellar to use later. When you are ready to use you soak it in water multiple times to get rid of all the salt. When ready you bread and fry it. I was wondering if either of you have any ideas for the roe or recipes?

I have never done anything with the roe😢

Something to think about!
post #9 of 11

My grandmother used to just straight up fry the roe of pretty much any fish we got, slice of dark rye bread and done. Roe can get a bit iffy every now and again, so it's always a good idea to soak it.

 

You could crumb and fry it, serve with a caper and butter sauce, or make Kazunoko. I'm sure there's a proper name and a more traditional way of preparing it... Bring some dashi and soy to the boil, kill the heat, carefully drop in the roe pieces and marinate for a day or two.

 

Cooking them in butter and mustard is an old classic as well. Or if you're all modern and have a little smoking gun, poach the roe gently, smoke and serve on crusty toast with some anchovy butter and lemon juice...


Edited by mikey--m - 12/25/15 at 7:34am
post #10 of 11

I make lake salmon caviar every season up here. The recipe is very easy. Simply soak the roe in a salt brine solution for an hour, strain and rinse, then pack in jars. I can even freeze the jars.

I love fried roe on toast with sour cream or creme fraiche.

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikey--m View Post
 

My grandmother used to just straight up fry the roe of pretty much any fish we got, slice of dark rye bread and done. Roe can get a bit iffy every now and again, so it's always a good idea to soak it.

 

You could crumb and fry it, serve with a caper and butter sauce, or make Kazunoko. I'm sure there's a proper name and a more traditional way of preparing it... Bring some dashi and soy to the boil, kill the heat, carefully drop in the roe pieces and marinate for a day or two.

 

Cooking them in butter and mustard is an old classic as well. Or if you're all modern and have a little smoking gun, poach the roe gently, smoke and serve on crusty toast with some anchovy butter and lemon juice...

 

Mine too and I still cook roe like little sausages.  Striper roe I'll smoke and it's delicious.

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