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idea for a simple pastry product that would require minimum of investment - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbuff View Post

Thank you all for your effort. I realized that further explaining only encourages our rambling to go on forever. 
My suggestion: read the original post, and if you can't answer it, just don't answer. The reasons why you don't answer are are required. It seems plain and simple to me. I hope it is a forum for responsible people, not a kindergarten. That;s how  a grownup man approaches a question.  By respecting the one who asks. If it's stupid, let him be stupid. 
Thanks again.

PS I aopogizing if  sounded ungrateful. I did glean some valuable advise/information from some of the posts. It was just a general comment.

Wow.

PS. Have you considered Rice Krispy treats? Everyone loves them, they can be creatively molded, and dressed up in an unlimited number of ways. Plus the require almost no equipment and limited ingredients.
Edited by BrianShaw - 1/2/16 at 10:27am
post #32 of 48

This reminds me of people asking me if they should buy a restaurant. They tell me it looks so easy and so much fun. I tell them it goes from "fun to going out of business" in a heartbeat......It looks like were throwing around this Professional Pastry Chef title. 

post #33 of 48

Time for a new forum, or a new category:

 

Forum options: Ask a chef (like chefpeon suggested a while ago): you can pose questions to the pros.  Anyone (any ability whether student, newbie, at home cook) can ask, only the pros answer.  Existing forums stay in their current form.....

 

Titles: New option for culinary professionals with LESS THAN 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE WORKING IN A PROFESSIONAL (COMMERCIAL) LICENSED KITCHEN.  It seems to me that it takes a solid 3 years for people to "get it" when they are new to the food service industry.  And for those who prefer a different line of work within the food industry, 3 years is about when they decide to make a change from an active cooking role to a different role (food service sales, FOH, other managerial roles).  I don't have any ideas for what to call this, though.

 

We are all eager newbies once; we have to be careful not to kill someone's enthusiasm but not encourage an ego before it's ready.  Sometimes it's hard.  People post once or twice and then never come back to find out that a passionate bunch  are answering their questions......

 

Kuan, what say you?

post #34 of 48

Sounds like a good idea. Too many people asking very basic questions that have given themselves the title of pro when asking how best to make a stock, it's too obvious.

The "professional caterer" is also another. How many one hit wonder threads are there on how much potato salad should I have for 50 people or how much pasta should I cook.

The "Home Chef" moniker is another. WTF is a home chef?

post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

 

The "Home Chef" moniker is another. WTF is a home chef?

Well, I could say it out loud, but this being a family site and all, don't think I should.  But if chefbuba were to buy me a beer or two, he could have his answer.  Mind you, by that time you'd need a crow bar to get us both out of that bar......

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #36 of 48

@BrianShaw OMG, that's hilarious! Thanks for the laugh!!! Now that I think about it.......Rice Krispy Treats are probably just kbuff's speed.

 

And I wholeheartedly agree with JCakes........I've been in contact with @Nicko about pro forum rules and the fact that non pros are constantly posting here despite what it says at the top of the page. I've been flagging posts as necessary, but it doesn't always work for some reason. 

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

Well, I could say it out loud, but this being a family site and all, don't think I should.  But if chefbuba were to buy me a beer or two, he could have his answer.  Mind you, by that time you'd need a crow bar to get us both out of that bar......

I'd buy you that beer, I'm only about 6 hrs south and with the exchange rate the way it is I might be able to buy an extra or three.

post #38 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post


Wow.

PS. Have you considered Rice Krispy treats? Everyone loves them, they can be creatively molded, and dressed up in an unlimited number of ways. Plus the require almost no equipment and limited ingredients.

I didn't. Thank you BrianShaw. 

post #39 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post
 

 

Thank you for these packaging pics.

post #40 of 48

the best price I've found on those clear plastic boxes is papermart.com; if you get them, *air them out first* because they definitely have an odor to them.  Assemble them in advance because since they ship flat, and really push on the folds as you are creasing them otherwise the squares look more like inflated dice rather than square cubes...

post #41 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCakes View Post
 

the best price I've found on those clear plastic boxes is papermart.com; if you get them, *air them out first* because they definitely have an odor to them.  Assemble them in advance because since they ship flat, and really push on the folds as you are creasing them otherwise the squares look more like inflated dice rather than square cubes...

Thank you. Those are really nice and inexpensive ones.

 

I've found some interesting designs. Those must cost a fortune to make, forgive me for posting them for they are not really practical for our purposes. And of course there has to be balance between the content and the packaging, so it won't feel like trying too hard. Just couldn't help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 I like this one in particular.

 

Cheers


Edited by kbuff - 1/6/16 at 6:13pm
post #42 of 48

Definitely memorable packaging, and definitely expensive!

post #43 of 48

If you want to spend the time you can make origami boxes.

 

http://www.origami-instructions.com/origami-boxes-and-containers.html

 

I only do this when I make truffles for my kid's teachers or bake sales, stuff like that.  Takes too long, but it's an idea at least.  You might be able to assembly line them.

post #44 of 48

I think this thread needs to go guys what is the point. It is just a bashing thread. @Pete @kuan agree? I will just delete it if you are in agreement.

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #45 of 48

Despite a bit of testiness earlier in the thread I'm finding this discussion quite useful, as it seems is the OP. The creative packaging suggestions are quite valuable. Deleting might not be in the best interest of the community.

post #46 of 48

It is kinda wandering all over the place but if @kbuff doesn't mind (and it is his thread) I don't see any reason to shut it down completely.

It would be nice if he would maybe contribute in other threads (or maybe start a new one re packaging).

I love to see how others present treats as gifts.

 

mimi

 

Talking smack :laser:  is just part of our world and as long as no one gets hurt I vote to leave it be.

 

m.

post #47 of 48
Thread Starter 

Thank you all.

I apologize for the tone of some of my replies. 

post #48 of 48

Love a well written humble post/PM.

Have written more than my share lol.

 

Welcome to CT @kbuff.

 

mimi

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