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Dry Madeira Substitute

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey Guys,

 

I was going to try chicken liver parfait which calls for dry Madeira? I cannot find any in my local shops the only one I found was Leococks Saint John Full Rich so I figured mybe I can substitute it.

 

What does full rich mean? Are all Madeira wines sweat? 

 

http://www.beersofeurope.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/pimages/LeacocksSaintJohnMadeira.jpg

post #2 of 12

Port? Vermouth?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ok thanks, but how much does the sweetness very between dry, medium dry etc? I never tasted it so I have no clue what it is etc that's why I am so confused !!

post #4 of 12

I would suggest you buy a bottle of each and have your own taste test. I find individual preferences matter a great deal with wines and liquors. You don't need to buy expensive bottles the first time. Your local shop should be able to direct you in making a selection. Be sure to talk to the owner and not an hourly employee who may not yet be familiar with particular types and brands. The owner should know what they are buying and where it is located or they can get some in for you. 

     All shops sell by neighborhood preference so if you don't find what you want in one, try another. 

The first step is to answer your own question by tasting each. No one can tell you what a banana tastes like, you have to experience it for yourself. Whether you like it or not is the second question.

post #5 of 12

Wise words.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

The only one I managed to find and I haven't bought it yet is full rich and it was like 18eu, what I am afraid of is figuring out if it's good for the recipe I will be making, I do tend to taste/test stuff on my own but when supply is limited I try to get an opinion before so I wont end up spending a hundred euros in stuff I rarely use.

 

Would you use a full rich for a duck liver parfait? The recipe states dry. If you think its not good, the best I may be able to get is medium dry but I am not sure if the shop they told me about has it in stock. What do you think?

 

(I live on an island :P most ppl have never heard of madeira wine)

post #7 of 12

dry marsala

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #8 of 12

What's the recipe?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #9 of 12
Chicken liver pate is very forgiving. Sherry or vermouth or Marsala are options that work well if Maderia is hard to get. Port would be awesome. My favorite, though, is Calvados.
post #10 of 12

The general rule is not to cook with a wine you would not drink. The same is true for what you are attempting. If it tastes rich by itself, it will add a rich flavor to your pate. Unlike baking, there is much room for interpretation in cooking. So using the liquor called for in the recipe will duplicate the flavors of the original. But that doesn't mean you can't use something different. The important step with whatever wine or liquor you use, is to taste it first. If you enjoy drinking it straight, then you can be assured that you will most likely enjoy it in whatever dish you are making. If it tastes awful straight out of the bottle, it will make the food taste awful as well. 

     Having said that, you would not substitute a sweet white wine in a recipe that calls for a rich red Bordeaux. But you could substitute a different good quality red wine. 

    Chicken livers, in addition to being forgiving, are also pretty inexpensive. So make the pate with what you can get. Then when you get what you are looking for, make some more. Enjoy the experimenting. 

post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yeah will do :) Thanks for the help, will let you know what I used and how it came out !! Thanks for your help guys

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey guys just want to let you know that I found dry madera !!! I also did the pate and turned out great :D I used raymond blanc's recipe but cooked it in a sous bide bath instead of oven =D

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