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Average longevity of a cutting board

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Over the past 2-3 years I have had to replace several wood cutting boards due to warping and splitting.  The last one I bought was a large walnut board I thought would last a while.  Of course, when I bought it I hadn't done my research and only how realize why it didn't last.   Poor care and not the best quality in the first place.    So I decided to do some serious research and buy a nice one this time.   But that research and reading reviews has only taught me that cutting boards still warp and split for people who do care for them properly.   Even people who have purchased Boosblock boards and who oil them regularly have posted bad reviews stating how their boards warped and split after only a few weeks or months.

 

So my question is, is there any hope that with the proper care I can keep a board longer than 2 years?   Out of frustration I ordered a maple hard board from a company going out of business so I got a good deal (I think).  Specifically this one.  http://www.chefscatalog.com/product/29863-chefs-maple-cutting-board.aspx 

 

I felt it's cheap enough that if it does split or warp, at least I won't be out $200+ dollars.   Still tho, over the years I am sure I've spent more than that replacing broken boards.  The only board that has lasted for years is a little plastic one I hate using.

post #2 of 18
Thread Starter 
I think my question was not terribly clear with all my rambling. Has anyone kept a board in good shape for a considerable length of time? If so what material and grain was it and how did you care for it?

I'm afraid I don't have much confidence in my ability to find a good one worth the extra money.
post #3 of 18

Get a good thick end grain one from TJ Maxx.  That's where I got my last one about 10 years ago and it's still going strong.

post #4 of 18
My oldest beard is a small edge grain that came from some discount store. It must have been cheap because I bought it when I was broke. That was about 1982 and it is still in daily use. Another end grain (Boos?) is from about 1990 and still in use. I have a 5 year old JK Adams (one of their less expensive thin boards) that gives no trouble. I've only oiled these boards once, about 6 months ago.
post #5 of 18
I wash mine with hot water, scrub as required with sponge or non-metallic scrubbie, dry immediately and store on thrir side in an open area with decent airflow.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Really?? I haven't been able to keep a board healthy longer than a year. In fact, neither of the two boards I still own are older than 2 years and those are already warped and splitting. I must really be doing something wrong!
post #7 of 18

I have a Boos board that is about 15 yrs old, still in great shape. I don't cut meat on it and wash with hot water and soap, bit of clorox if needed let it dry thoroughly on a rack. Never have oiled it.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmmgeekette View Post

Really?? I haven't been able to keep a board healthy longer than a year. In fact, neither of the two boards I still own are older than 2 years and those are already warped and splitting. I must really be doing something wrong!
Really; I wouldn't tell you a lie! 😊

Yes, that could be true that the issue is in the boards you buy or how you treat them. What kind if boards are you using? How do you treat them?

The only board I've ever had split is the bread board that was part of the kitchen cabinet. I think it is made of softwood.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

I have a Boos board that is about 15 yrs old, still in great shape. I don't cut meat on it and wash with hot water and soap, bit of clorox if needed let it dry thoroughly on a rack. Never have oiled it.

Not intending to usurp the thread, but... What do you cut meat on?

I use one of my boards for meat and the other for veg. My third board has two side that are marked meat and veg.
post #10 of 18

I have a couple of poly boards, they go in the dishwasher..

post #11 of 18
I've had one boos block for about 10 years. In the beginning I oiled it on a regular basis as reccommended, but I started to get lax with the oil and would just do it every so often. I later replaced that on with a 24 inch boos block, and it gets treated just as chefbuba says, no meats get cut on it, and it gets washed with hot water and a little soap. I've has that one for about 5 years. The only issue I've had with splitting is from when (like a moron) I put a hot sauce pan directly on the surface, I wasn't sure what I was thinking. But where I put the pan, it split a little bit, so that was my own stupid falt. If you have a restaurant supply by you, you can generally find a good deal on blocks. I've seen some by winco, which I haven't tried, but the price looked good.

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post #12 of 18

I love me some plastic/nylon boards over wood. Even after washing, wood holds onto flavors of onion and garlic that will transfer to other foods particularly fruit. 

 

Plastic is easier to clean, goes in the dishwasher. I don't have problems with the knife edges chipping either. I don't see any advantage to wood. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #13 of 18

Mine is a brand named Mountain Woods.  It's 3" thick.  But I suspect a Boos is just rebranded with a stamp.

post #14 of 18
It could be a JK Adams. They Manufacture for rebranding too.
post #15 of 18


I love wood, I love working with wood, I love working with hand tools making furniture.* But I have never endorsed wood cutting boards.  Wooden counter tops, yes, wood bread boards, yes.  Wood presentation/cheese/pastry boards, yes.  But wood is a lousy material for cutting boards.  

 

This doesn't have anything to do with the workmanship or quality of cutting boards currently available, because some of them are really high quality.

 

Wood is NOT inert.  Doesn't matter if it's kiln dried, air dried, or re-purposed walnut from a 200 yr old farm house posts and beams; wood moves with humidity, or lack of humidity.  It will warp, cup, twist, check at the ends, and fail along glue lines if it is used every day and cleaned every day--as sure as death and taxes.

 

I've worked in professional kitchens all my life, in 3 continents, but every health inspector I've met wants to know how cutting boards are sanitized in the kitchen.  There are only two ways:  High heat, or chemicals.  Both of which wreak havoc with wood cutting boards. 

 

So I will suggest, just like I've suggested to every other poster on this site regarding solid wood cutting boards, to put them on display and use a nylon cutting board instead.  Chop raw chicken, pork, eggs, juicy beets, onions, garlic, whatever on it, rinse it off, toss it in the dishwasher, let it air dry, and be done with it.  If you want to use wood cutting boards for slicing bread, why not?  Very rarely do you need to sanitize it, but it will get scarred and loose it's good looks.

 

 

P.S. the picture is one of my latest projects, a TV stand I made from western (soft) maple, almost entirely with hand tools.  I love wood and I love to work with it.

Hope this helps

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

I have put hot pots on top of the cutting boards repeatedly before.  That is probably the biggest thing I was doing that I didn't know was bad.   The boards that have split which we put into the dish washer I now know it was a bad idea to do that. 

 

Ironically, I have a cheap board about 1" thick that has begun to split in about 5 places and was warped at one point (it has flattened itself out) that I still use because it hasn't completely broken.  That was cheaper than the nice big one that broke in half.    

 

I learned a couple things today from this board and from a reply after emailing boosblock company.  You have to oil on both sides.  I didn't know that.   Well, My new board hasn't arrived yet but I think with this new knowlege I can help it last me a while.    

 

I also have a new board (this one:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0032AM0BC)  to use for cutting meat from now on.   

 

thanks for all the feedback.   I understand wood is not inert, but I still prefer it for cutting veggies and maybe one day I might give up and go plastic.  But not yet!

post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 

I had written a whole reply but then I lost it.    I just want to thank those who answered.  I have learned a few more things about what NOT to do with a board including putting hot pots and pans on top of it.  I emailed a supplier of boosblock with a general warranty question and also learned from him that I should oil the boards on both sides.  I don't think I ever did that with my others.  

 

I bought a nice plastic board for cutting meats and when the wooden one arrives, I hope I will be able to do a better job at keeping it alive.     I know wood isn't inert but I will stick with wood anyway for now.  It is my preferred for cutting.

post #18 of 18
I am a home cook. I am certain that the seizure a health inspector would suffer watching me cook would prove fatal. That said In 35 years of cooking I have made neither myself nor anyone for whm I have cooked sick.

With that disclaimer...I have a 3 year old 24"x18"x2.25" end grain walnut reversable Boos cutting board. It is magnificent, if not entirely sanitary. It is my primary work surface for all my cooking and baking. I do not do a lot of butchering, and on those rare occaisions when it does meet with raw poultry I do wash the surface with soap & water. Other than that It has been oiled on a not too regular basis and it has been sanded once. It does "bow" over time, but I flip it and it bows back. It is very heavy.

I do not like what other than wood does to my knives. For that reason thiis board was worth the $200+ investment, giver the investment I have in my knives. I don't have kids, but if I did I suspect that this board would be available for their kids to use 😊

Kyle
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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