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Opening a bakery/patisserie

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi guys,

I'm planning on starting my own bakery / patisserie place. Does anyone have any suggestions where I can purchase all the equipment and accessories from? Upto date stuff. For the bread, croissants, pastries etc. much appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 10
Ummm.... Bakery eqpt supplier? Which one? I dunno, what city do you live in? If you buy anything off the internet, you're on your own with installation, setting up, servicing and troubleshooting.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
post #3 of 10

What foodpump said. And also, buy used whenever possible. 

post #4 of 10

If you have time look for auctions in your are and neighboring cities and states. You may also look at putting a local ad in your newspaper or Nickel paper listing what items you need. May people who go out of business have leftover equipment that may not sell during an auction or other kind of sale. Put the word out you would be surprised on what people hold on to in storage. 

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all.
post #6 of 10

I opened a bakery a year ago.


I shared space for years with others so I could save enough to buy the equipment I needed.


A few things I learned:


Don't buy used refrigeration.  You're buying someone else's problems and you can't afford to be down because those problems will surface at the most inconvenient time (I do not have personal experience with this, just anecdotal). 


There is a difference in refrigerated cases.  A deli case cools from the bottom up; so if you buy a deli case thinking it's fine for pastry, this will cause your products to be colder on the bottom compared to the top of the product.  Buy a bakery case, the cold air is circulated so everything is the same temp.


For refrigeration, have a backup plan: either know where you can get a rental unit same day or have an extra single door or two door reach-in in case something fails.


Buy from a reputable used equipment dealer who's willing to give you a warranty (usually only 30 days but better than nothing).  Buy used ovens, a used range (if you need one) and you can buy used ventilation/hoods just make sure the ansul stuff is up to code/up to date. 


Depending on where you are locating, investigate the health dept requirements in advance, before you sign the lease (or even begin lease negotiations).  Find out whether or not an external grease trap is required or if there is legislation planned that might require one in the future.  My space had been a restaurant 20 years ago, and there was an external grease trap and I am lucky I was already connected.  I didn't have proof at the time I signed the lease (the town didn't have finished septic plans on file) so I put it in the lease that connecting to a external town-mandated grease tank would be at the expense of the landlord.  (He agreed because he knew the unit was already connected, but your mileage may vary.)


Also, the health department has the final word.  If you hire an architect (because you need to have plans in order to do construction); find one who has done food service/restaurant work and make sure they know the rules in the town you are locating in.  Have the health dept review the plans before you submit a construction permit.  Do not believe the architect if they say they asked the building inspector and the bldg inspector says it's fine.  Make sure the health dept says it's fine, they're the ones giving you the permit to operate.


Don't spend all your money before you open.  You will need at least 25% beyond your budget for all the  unplanned things that come up.


Good luck!

post #7 of 10
Originally Posted by chefpeon View Post

What foodpump said. And also, buy used whenever possible. 


But not refrigeration.  Never buy used fridges or freezers.

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feed back. I have 2 restaurant and this is the farst bakery I have with me my manger he no abut 85% abut bakery and pastry.I am leaving in bahrain in the medil east.and we r looking now for the chef who can start with us.
post #9 of 10

If you are in Bahrain then you know that the heat and humidity are going to be a challenge when it comes to the baking/pastry side of things. Your most important investment that you can make is getting a proper HVAC/air conditioning unit for your bakery to help keep the temperature moderate. Baking is a SCIENCE so you try to do things besides bread without a proper atmospheric temp then you will loose money on your bakery from all the product that doesn't turn out and have to throw away. SUPER IMPORTANT!!!

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yes man I never thought about it. $$$$ and if any one have any suggestion please let me know. I want to make some different things that will make people come back again I mean something that they can enjoy it while they r sitting I have approximately 20 tables with 4 chairs so I have a total of 80 sofa chairs.
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