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Making Ice cream?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

My girlfriend got me an ice cream maker for Christmas. Quite a good one actually I was gonna by a cheaper one. Anyway any tips? Things that can go wrong things to make it better? I've never made ice cream before. Gonna start with chocolate ice cream because well I love chocolate.

P.S. I know this thread maybe would be more appropriate in a the home cooking section but I will use the techniques at work so it does technically count.

post #2 of 12
Ah, ice cream. My first foray into ice cream making ended in disaster lol. I tried to make smarties ice cream for my girlfriend (who is now my wife...) and ended up with this grey mess.

It's all about your mix. Work on a very tasty mix,and a few drops of vodka make all the difference in the world.

My Favorite books are Ben and Jerry's ice cream recipes, and a Perfect Scoop by David Lebowitz.

Most of all, get in there, screw up! It's the best way to learn.

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

Reply

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

Reply
post #3 of 12

"The Modern Cafe" by Francisco Migoya has some great recipes and some insight into the science and technique behind ice-cream. There are a lot of variables when making ice-cream and different ideologies (creme anglaise base with egg yolks or egg free, sugar content, milk/cream ratio are points of debate by many). That being said making ice cream at home is pretty straight forward, I've even used recipes out of the churner's box and have had satisfying results. The French Laundry book has some reliably solid results as well that I've used many times at work.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Well I finally made my Ice cream. It was OK the next day but didn't set at first. When I was churning it it never got thicker than a thick cream consistency. What consistency should it go to? But however it did set my the next day and was nice but I'm pretty certain it should set faster.

 

I'm put a link to the recipe I followed maybe someone can tell me where I might have gone wrong.

 

This is the recipe I used. Wanted to start of with a more easy recipe. http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/chocolate-recipes/chocolate-ice-cream/#fSL3Pe8jDgGz5SVR.97

 

Now when I melted the chocolate and milk instead of doing it in a pan I did it in a bowl over some water. Don't think that would have affected it but when I beat the eggs and sugar it is possible I might not have taken them far enough. Could that affect it and what consistency should they be at?

Now where  had to cook it all together and thicken it again it is possible I may have not took it far enough. I did it over a bowl over some water again and perhaps I should have done it in a pan.

Then I combined the cream and mixture together but I added the cream to the mixture like the recipe said but I think it may have been better to add the mixture to the cream because bits of cream were not stirred in properly.

So that is what I did any ways to make it better would be great.

post #5 of 12

Without knowing what kind of ice cream maker you have it would be difficult to tell where you went wrong, if you did.  It is really important, especially in home machines to make sure that you mix was fully chilled before putting it in the ice cream maker.  If you didn't do that, and have one of those machines where you have to freeze the bowl you may have warmed up the bowl too much.  Also most home machines except for the really high end models with a powerful cooling unit, won't get you all the way to soft serve consistency.  It will need a good long rest in the freezer to harden of, at least 2-3 hours for hard pack.

post #6 of 12

[edit]  What Pete said!

 

With a Dovier and well-chilled custard, soft serve or harder consistency is easy to achieve. With warm custard it is impossible. If not spun correctly it is difficult to get good results. I don't have a refrigerated ice cream maker so can't comment on those.

 

Re: recipe... I avoid any ice cream recipe that requires whipping the cream.

post #7 of 12
All good advice.
Keeping your anglaise as cold as possible is very important if you are using a churning bowl that you need to freeze beforehand.
And you will still need to freeze it further once churned if you want anything more than soft serve.
Sugar content is important to avoid iciness and to achieve a better creaminess.

Good luck
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi

Some great advice so far. But was there any mistakes in my technique  from what I described so far or was it just probably that them mixture wasn't cold enough when it went int he ice cream maker?

OW by the way the ice cream maker I used did need to be kept in the freezer overnight it wasn't a really expensive one that didn't require that.

post #9 of 12
Maybe just try reading and following the directions that came with the machine.
post #10 of 12

I wouldn't whip the cream.  Air will be incorporated during the churning process.  Using one of those home machines, where you freeze the bowl (its what I use at home as I can't afford the $250-500 for a self contained model with compressor) you won't even get to full soft-serve stage but it should be close.  Just pull it after the recommended amount of time as with your type of machine it won't get any harder and in fact can end up going the other way as the bowl begins to warm.

post #11 of 12

Pete's right. If you pre-whip the cream, it will likely overwhip when the machine churns it. You'll get a grainy texture (fat coalescing into butter) and reduced volume, not increased. There are hundreds of pages of useful information on ice cream making. One of the most important things is to just make sure the mix is thoroughly chilled before freezing in the machine. Just like with whipped cream, the fat needs to be crystalized before it will whip. And your home machine could use the head start it gets with cold mix.

post #12 of 12
I still make ice cream in a 50 year old, manual hand cranker,
with a stainless pot and wood paddles attached to an alluminum
frame. If i dont have that cannister, the paddle assembly, and all
ingredients freezing-cold from the start, its all a lost cause from
the get-go......itll never set up right.
The newfangled makers arent much better.....unless of course
theyre of commercial quality......and $$$$.
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