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Eggplant salting ??

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Prepared eggplant followed the instructions,Salted the eggplant on both sides  liberally.Let them stand, until they let go of there juice ,and wilted slightly .Washed them with cold water and dried each one with paper towels.Then went on with the recipe,wife complained the dish was salty, I did not add that much salt to the dish.I am assuming the preparation of the  eggplant made the dish salty.Does anyone know if rinsing the eggplant removes all the salt or is some of it left behind ?Is there a better way to  do it ?? 

post #2 of 24

I the eggplant is young and fresh, there is no real need for that old-fashioned salting to get rid of bitterness technique.

post #3 of 24
Young and fresh eggplant in January?

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 24

Some is left behind. Additionally, you concentrate the salt already in the eggplant as the eggplant gives up liquid when you salted it.  

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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Young and fresh eggplant in January?
well, somewhere they are growing fresh lol.

Jason Sandeman

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Jason Sandeman

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post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfcast View Post

Prepared eggplant followed the instructions,Salted the eggplant on both sides  liberally.Let them stand, until they let go of there juice ,and wilted slightly .Washed them with cold water and dried each one with paper towels.Then went on with the recipe,wife complained the dish was salty, I did not add that much salt to the dish.I am assuming the preparation of the  eggplant made the dish salty.Does anyone know if rinsing the eggplant removes all the salt or is some of it left behind ?Is there a better way to  do it ?? 
I would reduce your initial salting (you used the word "liberally") and I wouldn't add salt to the dish until the end, when I am adjusting the seasoning....

Jason Sandeman

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Jason Sandeman

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post #7 of 24

I think that's a bit old fassioned as @BrianShaw said. I would only salt if I wanted to fry to crisp.

post #8 of 24
What kind of Eggplant, how big, how old? The only reason you salt is to draw out the bitter liquid, right? When you cut open your Eggplant you can tell it's old if there are a lot of seeds there.

Now, if they are Asian eggplants, do not salt them. Baby Italian aubergine generally don't need salting either.

It seems like you are braising, given your question... What is the dish you are doing, and what's the recipe? It will give a better picture as to why you would want to salt your Eggplant.

Jason Sandeman

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Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

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post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captains View Post

I think that's a bit old fassioned as @BrianShaw
said. I would only salt if I wanted to fry to crisp.

I would salt if they are large, and have a lot of seeds, and I needed to grill them. Also, if I were to prepare them in the Italian marinade... You don't want the bitter flavor in there, I made that mistake once, man did the Eggplant taste like ass lol.

Jason Sandeman

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Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

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post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by welldonechef View Post

What kind of Eggplant, how big, how old? The only reason you salt is to draw out the bitter liquid, right? When you cut open your Eggplant you can tell it's old if there are a lot of seeds there.

Now, if they are Asian eggplants, do not salt them. Baby Italian aubergine generally don't need salting either.

It seems like you are braising, given your question... What is the dish you are doing, and what's the recipe? It will give a better picture as to why you would want to salt your Eggplant.

http://www.food.com/recipe/eggplant-aubergine-fit-for-a-sheik-sheik-al-mihshee-83484

post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the above replies,I had made this dish once before, and the eggplant had a different consistency when cooked.

And the eggplant let go of it juice as it baked making the dish a little watery.O yes I should have mentioned, I did not salt the eggplant on this initial try.  I will try this dish again next week ,I will not salt the eggplant. The instructions say to bake the dish covered wit tin foil for approx 50 Minutes .This time I will let it finish 20 minutes uncovered

,in hopes to get it right . I will post my results good or bad , If you have any other techniques, I could use fire away.

post #12 of 24

If you would share with us more information on the dish you are trying to perfect, perhaps more assistance can be rendered. Name of the dish; recipe; source of recipe?  The salt question has been addressed but the watery results are probably something entirely different.

post #13 of 24

That is very similar to how I make lasagne.  I use sliced of eggplant instead of pasta.  I slice, then press between paper then dry them in a low oven before building my layers.  

post #14 of 24

Lasagna made with eggplant = mousakka?  :)

 

I make a vegetarian lasagna with summer squash and oven roast before assembly to reduce moisture.

post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

If you would share with us more information on the dish you are trying to perfect, perhaps more assistance can be rendered. Name of the dish; recipe; source of recipe?  The salt question has been addressed but the watery results are probably something entirely different.


I can not post the recipe it gives me an error message .That I can not post outside links.

 

It is called Eggplant Aubergine it is much like Lasagna ,you layer your eggplant ,and put a preparation of chop meat .chopped tomatoes, onions ,and seasoning between the layers.

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

That is very similar to how I make lasagne.  I use sliced of eggplant instead of pasta.  I slice, then press between paper then dry them in a low oven before building my layers.  


Good Idea ! I would not have thought of that.Will give it a try

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

Lasagna made with eggplant = mousakka?  :)

 

I make a vegetarian lasagna with summer squash and oven roast before assembly to reduce moisture.

 

Moussaka is more like a shepherd's pie with either bechamel or mashed potatoes on top.  

post #18 of 24

I wouldn't salt for that. But I'm no professional :lol: I would be inclined to char grill those on the BBQ first and have those lovely smokey stripes on them.

btw, my kids love Eggplant.

post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 

Me to isn't it heavenly !

post #20 of 24

I grew some white eggplant last year. I picked them at 3 - 4 inches long, never had an issue with bitterness.

 

 

I plan to do two varieties this coming year, just have to decide which ones.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #21 of 24

I slice this for Eggplant Parm. I salt, not over salt but salt it this layer it in a colander with paper towels between each layer. I then wash and press dry each piece to get as much water out as possible. Works well when fried for this dish. I don't salt this dish anyway so if it did have some salt it would be ok.

 

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post
 

I slice this for Eggplant Parm. I salt, not over salt but salt it this layer it in a colander with paper towels between each layer. I then wash and press dry each piece to get as much water out as possible. Works well when fried for this dish. I don't salt this dish anyway so if it did have some salt it would be ok.

 

 

So there is no way to get all of the salt out once you go threw that process,even if rinsed well ???

post #23 of 24
  • surfcast, I do it for two reasons. One being taste the second being I want to draw some of the water out of the eggplant. When I fry these slices for the Eggplant Parm my wife will walk through grab a salt shaker and eat them. It's hard for me to get an idea from her because she's a salt nut. Remember that the Eggplant is like a sponge. I could take the pieces and twist this to get some water out. The salt that I have left in the Eggplant is ok, I just wouldn't salt the dish any further. Have you ever made Eggplant Parmigiana ?
  •  
post #24 of 24
It's your call. Tried it both ways (salted and unsalted). Haven't tasted much of a difference. Chances are, if you're making ep parm and using canned prepared sauce, and cheese, there's already a ton of salt and sugar.That would/should compensate for any "bitterness."

Poke around the web re male or female ep, gently pressing same with thumb for springyness. I love ep anyway I can get it. Bitterness has not been a problem. I even like the skin.
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