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Information on entry level commercial knives

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I am in the process of starting a small side business sharpening knives as well as providing a knife exchange program for local restaurants. I have a good general knoweledge of knives and sharpening them. My dilemma is in finding the best quality low end knife for my exchange service. I am currently looking at dexter russel basics, adcraft advantage, and wincos. Trying to keep the cost under 20$ a knife as there is not a very fast return on investment, but may consider spending a few bucks more if another brand were significantly better? I want to provide a consistant quality product but i do need to make a little money! Ideally i want to go with one brand/line across the board. With my restaurants current service, we never know what were going to get!
post #2 of 11

Welcome to cheftalk.

 

I'd suggest contacting some restaurant suppliers who don't sharpen themselves and see what they recommend.

 

Dexters are very soft, but I understand they take a beating better because of it, though don't quote me on this.  Never the less they don't hold an edge well.

 

I recently came across a China brand "Forever Sharp."  It was just a tiny pare, the grinding on this particular knife was not great (understandable as you can't afford to expend much effort of such a little knife that has to sell for about a buck), but the steel was surprisingly good, it sharpened beautifully (easy burr removal, keen edge) and has very good edge retention.   Significantly better than any German stainless fer sur.  I certainly would look into this company and/or whoever it is who actually produces them.  Problem of course with dealing directly with a Chinese company is that they seem to have no quams about shipping seconds.

 

 

 

Rick

post #3 of 11
Consider Victorinox with Fibrox handle. Easy sharpening. But that's an European point of view.
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post

Welcome to cheftalk.

I'd suggest contacting some restaurant suppliers who don't sharpen themselves and see what they recommend.

Dexters are very soft, but I understand they take a beating better because of it, though don't quote me on this.  Never the less they don't hold an edge well.

I recently came across a China brand "Forever Sharp."  It was just a tiny pare, the grinding on this particular knife was not great (understandable as you can't afford to expend much effort of such a little knife that has to sell for about a buck), but the steel was surprisingly good, it sharpened beautifully (easy burr removal, keen edge) and has very good edge retention.   Significantly better than any German stainless fer sur.  I certainly would look into this company and/or whoever it is who actually produces them.  Problem of course with dealing directly with a Chinese company is that they seem to have no quams about shipping seconds.



Rick

Been to one of 3 restaurant supply stores in my area, sold me the adcraft at cost as a trial. Plan on hitting up the other 2 this week. Great advice! Thank you!
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Consider Victorinox with Fibrox handle. Easy sharpening. But that's an European point of view.

Victorinox would be awesome but sadly a little out of my pricepoint.
post #6 of 11

OK I looked them up and you can forget about Forever Sharp.  From what I could find they do not make anything you would want to use in a professional kitchen.  But if you can find decently designed and finished NSF knives that use the same steel and heat treat you'd have a great cheap knife there.

 

 

 

 

Rick

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ill see what i can dig up!
post #8 of 11
ICELs are pretty hard. I never liked them, per se, but I remember them being a PITA to sharpen, so hopefully the hold an edge, too. I'm not sure if they're in your price range but you might be able to find a bulk price.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
These seem to be a viable option grande! Def at the ceiling of what im looking to spend but would love to offer my customers a quality knife. Im going to look further into these. Many thanks!
post #10 of 11

 I'm also starting a sharpening business in the southeast. Victrinox is my choice, they have been very easy to deal with and their product speaks for itself. They are a little more expensive but I think are worth it in the long run. Chefs know they are much better than most of the commercial grade competitors.

I do have one question for you I'm having trouble finding a cardboard or wooden box for transporting any suggestions?

 

Thanks

 

post #11 of 11

The USPS has such boxes for free.  Cork and bubble wrap make an acceptable package also.

 

The NSF Icels I saw have a crazy extension on the bolster that goes well past the edge.  I should hope they can be had without this feature that does nothing so much as make proper sharpening near impossible.  Of course it can be removed with some effort.  Icels seem otherwise about the equivalent of Vics/Fibrox, assuming they are as thin behind the edge as Vics.  I bought a 10" Vic just on curiosity and was pleasantly surprised to see a an edge between .014-015" over the whole length.  Typical for many other knives here is about .025, and over.

 

Wusthof pro are the same [unexceptional] German stainless as Vics and Icels, but have a harder temper.  Though I don't like the big-belly profile.

 

 

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 1/15/16 at 4:46pm
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