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Commercial dishwasher in a home kitchen (or a consumer one with removable racks)

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hey All,

 

considering changing my dishwasher and there is one specific features of commercial dishwashers that I'm really interested in: the removable racks.

 

It would be incredibly convenient to just pick a rack, bring it to the table after a dinner, load it up with dirty plates, put it in the dishwasher, then take the whole rack out and store it in the cupboard with the plates in it.

 

And while the first rack with the plates is in the dishwasher, you could load up a second one with silverware and glasses, which would go into the dishwasher when the first rack is done.

 

Few questions:

 

(1) Can you recommend any consumer dishwashers with removable, standard racks?

 

(2) If not, is it feasible to use a commercial dishwasher (hi temp or low temp?) in a home kitchen?

 

Thanks and talk soon!

post #2 of 15

Commercial units may be quick, but they are noisy and basically just sanitizers not washers. Dishes, etc have to be pretty damn clean before going into the unit. In addition, you have to figure out where to place the plumbed in 5 gallon buckets of detergent, rinse aid, and sanitizer.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 15

Which brings up the question.  Why are home dishwashers so slow?

post #4 of 15

Because they don't have the power of the commercial ones.  It's a trade off; if you want something that fits into smaller, home kitchen (usually under the counter), is not too noisy, doesn't use lots and lots of water, and you don't need to also find a place to keep all the chemicals that the machine uses each cycle (commercial machines aren't like consumer machines where you just pour a capful in-they are continuous feed systems) then you need a consumer machine.  If speed is all you require and you have tons of room, don't mind an ugly machine taking up a lot of floor space, you have room for all that, as well as a booster heater then go ahead and get a commercial machine.  The other thing you will need to take into consideration is making sure that your drains are of sufficient capacity as commercial machines dump a lot of water all at once, especially single tank machines, and most standard home drains are probably not large enough to handle that kind of load.

post #5 of 15

Oh, only all that... :p

post #6 of 15

Commercial dishwashers are set up to run all day and night.  The power cost is very high for these washers.  In home washers over the years I think the best is the kitchen aid.  Get a top end one not a budget one from the big box stores.

post #7 of 15

I want to point out that loading racks at the table is not as desirable as it sounds. 

 

All the drips from the plates go on your table. 

 

The loaded rack is going to be heavy and awkward to handle. You'll be bending over with an awkward heavy load which is high back stress. 

 

Most dishwashers, you can take out the racks just for access, maintenance or to accommodate bulky items. 

 

I've got a 17 yr old Bosch dishwasher. I've replaced the racks once for rusting through and could do so again at this point. I've replaced the control panel 4 times. But that's pretty minor over 17 years of use. It's very quiet to operate, water and electricity efficient and completes a normal cycle in 73 minutes. Plenty fast for home use. 

 

I expect to buy a new one in the next three years. One of the best questions to ask in buying a consumer unit is "how quiet is it". These tend to be the best designed and operating machines and they're very pleasant in the home. Cost more, but worth it. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for your answers!!!

 

Cheflayne, Kuan, Pete, Jimyra: thanks, giving up on the idea of using a commercial dishwasher.

 

Phatch: thanks for your comment. I understand the potential back stress, but the time saving  is huge. I can put my unit at a higher level than normal undercounter installation. I'd rather lift a big rack than take out plates one by one or at least I'd like to give it a try, if I'm uncomfortable after a couple of weeks, I can always stop!

 

I'm wondering if there are semi-pro dishwashers, with low power requirements, but still fit removable racks...

 

Talk soon!

post #9 of 15

You seem to forget that you still will have to prewash your dishes, glasses and flatware before putting them into the machine, it's not a garbage disposal. So even if you put them into a rack you should take them out, prewash to remove all food in a sink then place them back in the rack to go into the machine. If you only have the typical family dishes I don't see where the savings is. Matter of fact I don't even see the need for a dishwasher. After prewash hit them with a sponge, dish detergent and 140deg water and put them in one of those racks to dry.

post #10 of 15
Another point to consider. One reason that consumer grade dish washers have a longer run time is that they usually have a drying cycle. Most commercial machines don't unless you are looking at longer conveyor machines which run 15-20 feet in length and cost well over $60,000.
post #11 of 15

IMO buying a commercial dishwasher to use at home is like buying a Peterbilt Semi truck to

tow your boat down to the lake on holidays. Over-and-ABOVE kill.

I just bought a dishwasher at Home Depot and paid 300 bucks for it. The average price of a

commercial dishwasher is 2,500 to 4,000 dollars. And many are 220volt. 

 

They're rated NSF, meaning suitable for commercial use. Why? Lets put it this way, 

I will maybe get 4 or 5 years heavy use out of this 300.00 buck Amana, more if Im lucky.

But if I had installed that in a commercial kitchen, I'd be lucky if it lasted 6 months. 

Its all about power and quality of workmanship and materials. The commercial one eventually 

pays for itself in the 15 years you use it almost every day, mainly in time and labor savings.

But if its sitting in your house, it will NEVER justify its cost, energy usage and maintenance costs. 

 

My advice is to get yourself a high end residential DW, and order some replacement racks you can

hang on hooks in a closet or sommat.  Even if they charge you 150.00 per rack, thats still way

cheaper, and more sensible, than going the commercial route. 

post #12 of 15

We've had great satisfaction from a medium-level Bosch for over 12 years. It was pricey, but it's  virtually silent, which we like. In fact, what clinched our purchase was standing at a  counter in a store with several D/W's under it and looking at a brochure with the salesman. After a few minutes he pointed to the Bosch we were standing in front of and asked..."notice anything about this one?"  We said no and he said..."It's running.  

 

We bought it and have been very happy with it ever since

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks Halb, Pete, Meezenplaz, MIkeLM!

 

I'm starting to realize that my idea might make much less sense than it originally did in my head...

 

HalB: very true, I was thinking I would just put the tray in the sink, spray with high pressure water, then take the tray from the sink to the dishwasher, but I guess if stuff is really dirty with cheese peel, bones, etc... those may remain stuck in the tray.

 

Pete: true that I love cooking and hate cleaning, but I agree with you that 60 grands sounds a bit too much for meals with family & friends :-)

 

Meezenplaz: "My advice is to get yourself a high end residential DW, and order some replacement racks you can
hang on hooks in a closet or sommat.  Even if they charge you 150.00 per rack, thats still way
cheaper, and more sensible, than going the commercial route. "

This makes a ton of sense, I'll probably do just that

 

MikeLM: will look at Bosch too! My current GE is noisy as hell, I can hear it through 2 closed doors.

 

Talk soon & thanks again everyone!

post #14 of 15

My Bosch has removable racks, and full stainless steel interior.  It's very quiet too and it's my second Bosch in twenty years.  I got about 15 yrs. out of the first one and ran it almost every day.  When this one goes I'll probably get another Bosch.  

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Thanks Halb, Pete, Meezenplaz, MIkeLM!

 NP glad we could help. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

My Bosch has removable racks, and full stainless steel interior.  It's very quiet too and it's my second Bosch in twenty years.  I got about 15 yrs. out of the first one and ran it almost every day.  When this one goes I'll probably get another Bosch.  

That's great longevity Mike.....I wouldnt mind a Bosch myself.  

But this was a fixer upper situation so the extra $$$ wasnt warranted in this location,

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