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Silicone Pastry / Baking Mat

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone, I am designing a pastry mat that will be used for dough preparation and baking. I would really appreciate if you could share your experience with these kind of mats, and say what you like or don't like about them, so that I can improve my product.

 

I'm especially interested in the best dimension, color and useful info to be printed on the mat (despite of the baking shapes). Most of them have cooking conversions, but are they really useful when baking, or there is something else more useful?

 

Thank you.

post #2 of 8
I love using them.. Full and half sheet pan size. Something great would be printed circles for macarons/cream puffs for consistent sizing
post #3 of 8

I have two Silpats and a few other brands of these. The Silpats are the best. The KitchenAid sheets I have aren't dimensionally stable in the oven. The expand and cause buckling against the half sheet pan rims. There is a useless ruler printed on one edge. It's fine on a rimless baking sheet. 

 

The other set I have is more of a copy of the Silpats with the glass fibers for dimensional stability. I've not actually used this set yet. 

 

I'd rather nothing were printed on them personally. I find that more limiting than helpful. 

 

lighter is better than darker, both for color recogntion of the baked items and because dark colors can change baking behavior. They absorb heat and cook differently. 

 

I think you're getting into a market where there's not really anything new to offer and don't  have an idea of your own to drive this product. Wait until you figure out the right product. This market is now pretty commoditized and there's not much margin for you to recoup your costs. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 8

I agree with @phatch on this one.

There are an untold number of brands and pricing is all over the place.

Step into a Home Goods or Marshalls any day of the week and pick up one of the "top brands" at half (or lower) price.

The mats are all doing what is advertised for the most part...I have my favorites and the not so good ones are stored away in a cabinet for the big cookie occasions.

 

When I bake at home and have to do my own dishes I find them a hassle to wash and usually just use parchment.

Throw the paper away and stick the sheet pans or whatever in the dishwasher.

Easy peasy.

 

mimi

post #5 of 8

I agree with all of the above. The market for this kind of product is flooded. I'm sure if you look hard enough you will find something that you're trying to create.

  In production I always thought that I would like to invent a silicone mat that had the properties of something with a static cling like action. Then I would be able to use them with items that I was preparing with a collar. Something to fold the corners so as not to leak. Not sure if you know what a collar is though. It's a fiberglass collar that fits into sheet pans. 1", 2" 3" +

MFG Tray Bun / Sheet Pan Extender Fiberglass 2 High, fits Half-Size Sheet Pan (13 x 18) - 176119 1537

The collars are also made from metal and other products.

 

I have also thought that if I could come up with a baking sheet that was thermochromic, it would be a shark tank item. Say red sheet color is 350 degrees and you look in your oven while baking something and see that the mat is yellow, you will know you need to adjust temperature. This is the kind of crap I carry around in my head, instead of important things. LOL

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #6 of 8

Hi janevska,

 

I think everything has already been said... Out of curiosity why designing a pastry mat?

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurenlulu View Post

I love using them.. Full and half sheet pan size. Something great would be printed circles for macarons/cream puffs for consistent sizing

 

You're probably going to need to make your own stencil.  Checkout the book entitled The Art of French Pastry written by  Jacquy Pfeiffer, an award winning pastry chef born and trained in Alsace-Lorraine where strict adherence is the rule.  He really goes into piping technique.  But really, your own stencil is needed.

 

And download yourself copies of the 2014 and 2015 Matfer catalogs and have a look at the Gastroflex molds if that helps.  Some items may be featured in one catalog and not the other but a vendor may still carry the item.


Edited by kokopuffs - 1/20/16 at 8:48am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #8 of 8
Thanks koko!
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