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OLD TIME BARBEQUE

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

When I was young (1930 – 1940) my Mother would send me to the meat market to buy, what she called, “Barbeque”.

The butcher would cut off thin slices from a roast size piece of meat tied up with string.

My Mother would heat these slices in Barbeque sauce and serve it, (open face) on white bread.

 I have asked for this at a number of local meat counters but, they do not know what I am talking about.

Can anyone shed some light on what I am looking for? Some of my questions are:

What is its current “official” name of this product? (What do I ask for?)

What type meat is it? (I am pretty sure it is pork of some sort – maybe shoulder).

How is it processed? (Cured, smoked? )

Where can I buy it?

Thanks for any info you can provide. 

post #2 of 11

@AZFIREBALL56 unfortunately I can't give you any insight into what your mother bought, but I can tell you about what my grandparents used to make, that they called Barbecue.  First off, they would either make Pork Barbecue or Beef Barbecue-same method, different meat products.  Either way, it started with thinly cut pieces of meat, usually cut from larger, tougher cuts of meat.  This meat was braised on the stove top with water and some spices.  Once the meat was tender it was shredded and barbecue sauce was added and the whole thing cooked again until the sauce coated the meat with very little excess sauce for the meat to swim in.  The dish didn't really rely on an specific cuts, although tougher  cuts were usually used, first because they were cheaper, and secondly they provided a good amount of fat and connective tissue to keep the meat moist.  It was not cured, smoked or salted before hand.  The seasoning was done in the pot.  Not sure if this is what your mother made, but I do know that this was a popular way to make "barbecue" in the Midwest in my grandparents time (1930's-onward).

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks Pete for your timely reply.

That is not exactly what my Mother made but, sounds good!

Yes, we lived in the mid-west (Southern Indiana).

The stuff I am looking for was already cooked and treated (?) when I bought it at the store.

I think it was supplied to the butcher this way.

I remember the butcher would pull it out of his cold case (it was about the size of a large roast)

and slice it on his machine. Sometimes he would give me a small piece to eat while I waited.

It was tied all around with a very strong cord. Boy, was it good!

 

We had it only once or twice a year because it was relatively expensive as compared with sliced Bologna, which was our normal rations. This BBQ was a real treat!

I would like to taste it again, for old times sake!

Thanks again for your interest in my post.

Cheers!

post #4 of 11

I guess it is depends on where you are from.

When I was sent to the nearest butcher (for bbq) it was for links of coarsely ground (and highly seasoned) pork sausage.

House made and smoked then "cooked" on a huge pit out back along with a few shoulder clods and sometimes a pork cut of some sort.

It was a  Saturday thing (and very much welcome after the no meat Friday's observed in our Catholic home).

A loaf of spongy white bread and yellow mustard were the only other items on the table.

Ok maybe some jalapenos and onion and pickles of some sort.. but for me it was all about that meat .

So juicy it would gush down my chin :lips: .......

 

mimi

post #5 of 11

It could have been any of a dozen cuts of meat (usually fatty and less expensive) that has been smoked on low heat for a long time.

Brisket (beef) is more of a flat cut and popular here in Texas.

Shoulder clod (don't know the real name for this cut) is also popular but takes a bit of talent to prevent drying out and becoming tough.

 

mimi

post #6 of 11

Sorry.

You are looking for a tied pork roast.

TBH I have never seen this done but then again I am in Texas and most of the pork left after the usual ham cuts, belly and ribs is ground for sausage.

 

mimi

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you flipflopgirl for your reply to my post.

I think you are right about it being some sort of slow cooked/smoked Shoulder clod.

It was boneless and tied up very well with a cord.

It was the shape of a roast, not flat like Brisket.

Wish I could find some today, to fix for to my grandkids!

Cheers;

post #8 of 11

I would think it may be a boneless pork shoulder/butt section that is tied off and roasted. It could also be a rolled pork belly maybe even stuffed then roasted off looking like a panchetta......I'm leaning toward the pork shoulder/butt section boneless and tied and either smoked or roasted. If in Southern Indiana you ate the BBQ pork more like a sliced roast instead of being shredded then, the boneless pork Shoulder/butt would be more like it. Did your Mom take the sliced meat and just heat it in some BBQ sauce and then put it on white bread ?..........I grew up on the East coast the only thing i knew about BBQ was "NOTHING"......

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

Yes ChefBillyB. She would just place the slices in a frying pan and add some BBQ sauce and heat until the sauce was bubbly. 

Then she would serve it on a slice of white bread (open face), covered in sauce. With pickles, onions and mustard on the side.

It tended to be more in the form of slices rather than in pieces or pulled apart. Although, it was very tender. 

Wish I could find some!

Cheers;

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZFIREBALL56 View Post
 

Yes ChefBillyB. She would just place the slices in a frying pan and add some BBQ sauce and heat until the sauce was bubbly. 

Then she would serve it on a slice of white bread (open face), covered in sauce. With pickles, onions and mustard on the side.

It tended to be more in the form of slices rather than in pieces or pulled apart. Although, it was very tender. 

Wish I could find some!

Cheers;


I bet it was tender. The only thing I don't know is if it was roasted or smoked. You could ask you butcher or even go to a place that smokers meats. I would think back in the 30's and 40's a butcher shop would do it all. That may have changed over the years. A butcher that processes, cuts and wraps for people will also have a smoke house. Most of these places smoke sausage, ribs, hams, bacon and other cuts of meat. They will have a better understanding of what you're talking about. Go to an old time custom meat cutting market, if you see a kid that looks as old as you grandson, don't ask him. Look for the guy with gray hair telling stories.......Good luck.......

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

I think I have found what I had as a kid, called "Barbecue".  

I removed the bone from a pork shoulder. 

Tied it with string all around. Covered the top with salt and pepper.

Placed it in a cast iron covered pot with salted water.

Heated this for about 4 hours in the oven at 250 F.

Here is what I got.  

Just like old times!

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