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need help on a stew recipe

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ive been really into stews recently. keep in mind this is just cooking for myself as I am just learing. I usually like to fill up an 8qt pot and have it for the week.

Ive also been trying to make use of my new cast iron dutch oven (i think its 5qt).

With that said, I need to cook something though I am drawing a blank as what to cook. wondering if anyone has any ideas on what I can make. preferably on the cheaper side. Ive always wanted to cook with lamb but I cant afford it...

thanks guys.
post #2 of 21

Pasta e Fagioli (pasta and beans)

 

Inexpensive because it's all about common vegetables and beans. I suppose you can argue whether this is a stew or a soup. It's cooking time is short compared to a stew because it has little to no meat. But it's very thick which brings it more into the stew category. And if you cook your own beans, you can consider that stewing of the protein. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
hmm interesting. I will look into it. One thing I was thinking about is trying like a meat and yogurt stew of some sort?
post #4 of 21

One of my favorite dishes to cook, and one of the few ways my 9 year old daughter doesn't object to sweet potatoes, is to make Ground Nut Stew.  It's a somewhat spicy stew (you can control how hot), from Western Africa.  It's made with chicken and finished off with peanut butter (traditionally, finely ground peanuts).  We love it here, and make it often throughout the year.

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
I am a huge peanut and peanut butter fan.... will definitely look into this and make it. If I dont make it now I will in the future!

I am kind of set on this yogurt thing at the moment. maybe something indian. still not sure.
post #6 of 21

Yesterday I went to a Pakistani restaurant in the Phoenix area.  I had Fresh Karahi.   Chunks of meat cooked with onions, tomatoes, ginger, yogurt, garlic and homemade curry spices.  It was a little sweet and they confirmed they added a little honey.  Served with rice and Tandoori Bread it was very good.  It was available with different meats we chose the Goat.

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Yes Ive been looking for similar dishes like that. There is an indian dish that I think is the same.

I just want to try this meat and yogurt diet that I just learned about that I guess is known to old mongolia or something like that.

thanks for the advice.
post #8 of 21
You can make yugurtlu which is a Turkish stew with meat and tomatoes and served with yogurt.

Lani is not so expensive. Go to the butcher and ask for shoulder of lamb. It's perfect for a long simmered stew and since you're only cooking for yourself a pound will do and it's very cheap.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 21

Yogurt is usually added to an already cooked stew then gently heated. Actually cooking yogurt in a stew or soup causes it to curdle or separate.

post #10 of 21

I haven't had yogurt curdle on me and I use it to finish hot, simmering curry all the time.  Crème fraîche is also pretty stable.  I think it's sour cream you have to worry about.

post #11 of 21

To finish, yes.

 

To cook over a long period of time-- as in a stew, no.

post #12 of 21

I would be interested to hear of a stew/braise/simmer recipe that adds yogurt at the beginning.

post #13 of 21

A lot of tikka masala recipes marinate chicken in a yogurt/spice mix then add it to tomatoes/spices/cream. If you've never tried it's really good!

post #14 of 21

Depending on where you live there may be ethnic markets selling goat meat, which is somewhat similar to lamb but often cheaper. But I can see goat catching on and soaring in price. Shucks.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #15 of 21
Boeuf Bourguignon comes to mind. Serve it over broad egg noodles, pappardelle or crusty bread to stretch it out. Alternately, you could serve it over cooked lasagna noodles cut in thirds.
Edited by Cerise - 1/22/16 at 3:32am
post #16 of 21

Yeah, Yummmm.... Good idea.

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post

One of my favorite dishes to cook, and one of the few ways my 9 year old daughter doesn't object to sweet potatoes, is to make Ground Nut Stew.  It's a somewhat spicy stew (you can control how hot), from Western Africa.  It's made with chicken and finished off with peanut butter (traditionally, finely ground peanuts).  We love it here, and make it often throughout the year.

That sounds very interesting and I want to try making it with PB2 powdered peanut butter. I looked at several recipies and the ingredient lists are all over the place. Would you mind sharing yours?
Edited by Planethoff - 1/30/16 at 7:59am
post #18 of 21

ChefHoff, I'd love to give you a recipe, but this is one of those dishes that I have never measured out, and change up often, but I'll give you the basics.  Sorry it's vague, but its the best recipe I can come up with on the fly.

 

2 pounds chicken,, boneless & skinless, cut into 1 inch chunks (sometimes I use breast meat, sometimes thigh-sometimes I use whole, bone-in thighs, but get rid of the skin)

1 large or 2 small onions, diced

3-5 cloves garlic, minced

1-3 tablespoons of minced ginger

3-4 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks

1 large can of diced or crushed tomato

chicken stock

cayenne pepper, add to your level of heat, it should have a bit of kick to it at least

salt

pepper

curry powder, optional (no more than a tablespoon)

chopped cilantro, optional

peanut butter, either creamy or chunky

 

Heat oil in a pot and brown the chicken.  Remove and add the onion.  Saute until translucent.  Add garlic and ginger and cook 2-3 minutes.  Add curry powder and cayenne.  Cook another minute then add the tomato.  Add the chicken back in along with the sweet potatoes.  Add enough chicken stock just to cover.  Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and add peanut butter, 1 large spoonful at a time, and stir it in.  Continue adding peanut butter until you get  the consistency and flavor you want-usually about 1/2 cup.  Cook until sweet potatoes are tender and chicken is cooked all the way through (if using whole pieces add the chicken first, cook for 15 minutes then add the sweet potato).   Season with salt and pepper.  Add more cayenne, if necessary.  Allow to cook for 5 minutes longer.  Add chopped cilantro if using.  Allow to sit a couple of minutes longer then serve.

post #19 of 21
@pete Thanks. I can't wait to try it. I actually prefer just ingredient list and basic cooking instructions. That way I can tweak it to my tastes. I will go heavy on the cayenne and might even add other heat. Using the PB2 vs regular peanut butter I will probably add some additional sweetness.

In case you are unfamiliar with PB2:
https://www.bellplantation.com/https://www.bellplantation.com/
post #20 of 21


Hey Taku don't mean to hijack your thread, but the ground nut stew was very appealing to me. I made it and it will now be a regular in rotation. Amazing stuff. Thanks again @Pete
post #21 of 21

@ChefHoff I'm glad you liked it!!!

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