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Bad Water in Flint. How do people cook?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I know, a bit political, but I would like to know how restaurants are doing it and basically just how people are able to even cook in Flint MI.

 

Please no politics, just if you live in the area or know someone, I'm curious.  I would go mad I tellya.

post #2 of 16

I don't know but it's an interesting question.  I imagine that bottled water is being used for drinking and cooking.  However, what about washing dishes, bathing, etc?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 16

They may test at individual locations to check for lead.  I think the problem depends on the age of the piping.  Bad situation.

post #4 of 16
Knowing restauranteurs, restaurants are probably still using tap water. "What, you want us to close or something?
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

Knowing restauranteurs, restaurants are probably still using tap water. "What, you want us to close or something?
I can't imagine that any restaurant willingly wants to open themselves up to the possibility of someone getting sick at their restaurant. I imagine that bottles water is used for cooking and that the tap water used for dishes is getting a higher dose of chlorine.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 16
We had a water main break here last month, (small community) most of the restaurants. Including Mickey D's were closed for three days until the boil ban was lifted. Can't imagine a large city dealing with something like this.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


I can't imagine that any restaurant willingly wants to open themselves up to the possibility of someone getting sick at their restaurant. I imagine that bottles water is used for cooking and that the tap water used for dishes is getting a higher dose of chlorine.

 

This is true.  I suppose they can install water filtration systems too but what good small restaurant can afford to do that?

post #8 of 16
It's a stinky situation for sure, I hope it can be rectified. Its a stark reminder that we take our resources for granted.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 16

I drink and cook with distilled water it is the best and it is different than regular water. Every grocery store will have it, it is also not expensive as you may think.

 

Best of luck to you and stay safe. I'm sure it will be fixed in no time.

post #10 of 16

I work with two people who still have family in Flint. Anyone who can afford it is cooking with bottled water--and has been for awhile. Most people simply did not believe it when they were told the water was OK to drink. In the past couple of weeks there have been a lot of volunteer efforts to bring large quantities of bottled water in. I wonder less about the restaurant industry than I do about the hospitals. With the exception of a small, newly- gentrifying neighborhood downtown, it is mostly a poor city. Not much in the way of restaurant business there.

 

The in-home pipes are not the problem. It is the water mains into houses that have been destroyed. The Flint River water was not only pretty polluted to begin with, it was being piped in without having had anti-corrosion chemicals added to it, which is unheard of in a municipal water supply. Those chemicals coat the inside of older pipes so the metals don't leach into the water. That protective coating was corroded away, so even now that they've re-connected to Detroit's water supply, the infrastructure has essentially been destroyed. The Detroit water is cleaner and less corrosive but the damage has been done. There are no usable records as to where the oldest, most vulnerable lead mains are located.


Edited by ChicagoTerry - 1/27/16 at 10:01pm
post #11 of 16
Wow, that's even worse than I thought. I thought the polluted water was the biggest problem. So there's no solution in sight, really, then, is there?
post #12 of 16

Really an interesting discussion. I think the restaurant should use at least filtered or mineral water for cooking at washing dishes. 

post #13 of 16

@Grande --no, no solution in sight. They've switched back to water supplied by the city of Detroit which will also have anti-corrosion chemicals added with the hope that a new protective coating can be laid down on the interior of the pipes, but estimates of how long that might take all seem to be in terms of years--as in over a decade years. Estimates for repairing the damaged infrastructure range from hundreds of millions up into the billions of dollars. Then there are the long-term costs of medical and educational interventions for the thousands of young children who will suffer long-term effects of lead poisoning. No-one can calculate those costs.

post #14 of 16

It is just a bad situation all the way around.

If we had known way back when that the accumulation of lead in the body would cause such horrible long term damage it would be a different world.

All we can do now is clean up the messes and avoid the ingestion of lead in the future.

While we are on the topic of disasters....what is being done re http://michellemalkin.com/2015/08/19/obamas-toxic-environmental-pollution-agency-sexual-predators-toxic-dumps-data-stonewalls/print/

Such a tragic "mistake".

 

mimi

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

Knowing restauranteurs, restaurants are probably still using tap water. "What, you want us to close or something?
I can't imagine that any restaurant willingly wants to open themselves up to the possibility of someone getting sick at their restaurant. I imagine that bottles water is used for cooking and that the tap water used for dishes is getting a higher dose of chlorine.

 

Chlorine will not fix the problem.

Lead is not an organism that can be killed .

 

mimi

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Chlorine will not fix the problem.
Lead is not an organism that can be killed .

mimi
Truth.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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