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Sharpening stone - Page 2

post #31 of 42

Those looking for stones here in the States.

 

Grab the 5 or 8pc sharpening set here: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/shstse.html

 

Or for the best look here: http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/collections/stone-sets-and-combo-stones   That diamond stone set is very tempting, I just don't think I can justify it for my use.

 

 

 

 

Rick

post #32 of 42

Jon's Gesshin line of stones are really, really good.

post #33 of 42

I own this one.

 

http://www.jbprince.com/knife-sharpeners/combination-waterstone-1000-and-6000-grit.asp

 

and another more coarse dual stone I never use. 

post #34 of 42

no love for the Coticule, eh? That's so sad. It's the only rock you'll ever need.

post #35 of 42
Thread Starter 

Everyone got different opinions as it seems :P I'm way more confused now than before I made this thread xD

post #36 of 42
Originally Posted by Totte View Post
 

Everyone got different opinions as it seems :P I'm way more confused now than before I made this thread xD

I thought that is to be expected with all facets of life. :crazy:

post #37 of 42

Well, there isn't one exact right answer, but most all of the suggestions have been good ones XD

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by foody518 View Post
 

Well, there isn't one exact right answer, but most all of the suggestions have been good ones XD

 

Not really so much....The people that suggest he needs a 5k finishing stone or 5 piece sharpening kit from CKTG are flat wrong, and a belgian coticule is even finer than that....I understand they're popular for finishing straight razors.  

 

Our OP asked about stones and rods for Wusthof steel.  All he needs is a medium grit stone to complement the ceramic rod that he has already bought, a sharpie to find the bevel, something to keep it flat (drywall screen or diamond plate) and a bunch of practice. 

 

We're talking about soft steel here.  No need for finishing stones.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lqsbO1w8rXE

post #39 of 42

I agree.  For that type of stainless 1000-2000 grit stone is all you need.

post #40 of 42
Hence the qualifier of "most". You're right that a true 5k finish would be overkill. In my head I've kind of got the Rika (in the 5pc set) pegged as 3-4k which is almost acceptable? biggrin.gif it can be worked to leave a respectable amount of tooth.
post #41 of 42

I have to say that the video itself is bologna.  I've sharpened a wusthof ikon to 10K+ and the performance is far superior, especially compared to what I see in the video for the coarse grit edge, and also that is the only way to get such a knife slicing paper thin.  Whatever this individual did to "polish", the fact is he did not produce a keen edge.

 

The large carbide size of cheap stainless practically guarantees you a toothy edge, even at high grits.  One explanation for what we see in the video, aside from poor sharpening technique, is that he wound up putting on a rather obtuse edge, in which case I don't think he'd actually be cutting hair very well, and of course he did not demonstrate any hair shaving.

 

There is a lot of debate about what holds up better here, a coarse or fine grit edge, and possibly both sides are right.  I suppose it has a lot to do with a number of factors, particularly sharpening angle, the things you cut, and the way you cut them.

 

All I can say is that for my own experience with cheap stainless [using acute angles, light to no board contact], a polished edge works better all around.

 

Actually, I did do a bit of board work with the Ikon at one point.  I thought it held up rather nicely to the pounding with the high-polish microbevel, but boy did I have a lot more fatigued metal to remove come full-scale sharpening time, which of course would be expected.

post #42 of 42
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