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What Is Better, Canned or Dehydrated Mushrooms? - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Thread Starter 

why are mushrooms so expensive

post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post
 

why are mushrooms so expensive

Canned - because of the work associated with canning and the convenience to the end user.

Fresh - because they are perishable and don't store well

Dried - because of the extra work required to dehydrate and because they comprise more mushroom per unit weight than fresh

Specialty types - because not a general production crop

Rare types - because they are rare and may require harvesting in a non-farm environment

ALL - because folks will pay for them.

post #33 of 48

Anything that is light on weight looks more expensive when you are buying per pound.

Especially if it has been dehydrated (mushrooms, spices for example).

Once you get it on the scale there could be like a zillion pieces.

 

mimi

post #34 of 48

Someone else may have already mentioned this, but canned mushrooms may have sodium in the water and this will affect the final dish.  With dehydrated mushrooms, there is no sodium factor to worry about. 

post #35 of 48
Thread Starter 

I can buy canned in the dollar store. yes I know dehydrated mushrooms will float like a feather when dropped but figure they can be grown almost anywhere so not like short supply. Bought 16 oz. pack of white button yesterday in Best for $1.99, same in stop & shop were $3.99. I noticed doesn't matter which store used seams only 1 company sells the white or portabella, Giorgio. 

 

Straw Mushrooms?

 

Premium Dried All Natural Compressed Chinese Auricularia Black Fungus Mushroom? not the nicest looking mushrooms.  http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/Premium-Dried-All-Natural-Compressed-Chinese-Auricularia-Black-Fungus-Mushroom/1736016_32305078191.html


Edited by Dagger - 2/10/16 at 11:37am
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I'm with you on the dehydrated veggies @chefbuba but mushrooms handle this well. I've got chanterelles in my pantry! At nearly $30 per pound and available only at certain times of year I can only afford to buy my favorite mushroom once a year for a special occasion but I can keep it in dry form forever.

 

Chanterelle's are one of the only mushrooms that I find that lose all the flavour when dried (Actually Hedgehogs too). I find the best way to store these if you can't eat fresh are to freeze. I normally cook the chanterelle's and then freeze. 


Edited by KingNothing - 2/10/16 at 12:36pm
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

We get very nice dried pine mushrooms here. Strong flavored, they are a great addition to any stew.

 

 

Due to import taxes, both porcini and shitakes are prohibited for the moment.

You must be able to find some porcini (Bolete's) in the Patagonia region. 

post #38 of 48

Here are a few of the porcini's (King Bolete) that I found last fall, There are a few other Porcini's in there too.

l

 

 

And a bunch of really dirty hedgehog's prior to cleaning.

 

Also a nice haul of Chanterelle's. (Can't take credit for finding these though as my partners parents did, I did partake in the eating of them) :)

 


Edited by KingNothing - 2/10/16 at 12:36pm
post #39 of 48

KingMushrooms you should be called!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingNothing View Post

Chantrelles are one of the only mushrooms that I find that lose all the flavour when dried (Actually Hedgehogs too). I find the best way to store these if you can't eat fresh are to freeze. I normally cook the chantrelle's and then freeze. 

Oh well it's either dried or nothing. Can't afford to buy them fresh. I'm quite different than the OP in that I tend to do a lot of shopping at specialty markets and upscale grocery stores and am willing to pay good money for good produce, organic whenever possible and wouldn't set foot in a Walmart. But even so, I cannot afford fresh chanterelles but once a year. Just can't.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #41 of 48
[/quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

Dagger, why don;t you go shopping at the market? Dehydrated vegetables, I just can't imagine. I live in the middle of nowhere, we have two small markets I can get the basics of fresh produce seven days a week from 7-9. Main shopping is an 80 mile round trip if I don't want to pay 25-50% more.

I agree!
post #42 of 48

Was at the store and glanced at mushroom prices cuz this thread popped in my head. Didn't bother looking to hard as we weren't going to buy any, but if I had a say I'd like to have a few packs of dehydrated for the rare occasion it would heighten a dish in my household. How long can you keep them stored dehydrated? Had canned mushrooms once and was really put off, don't think I'd try to put any effort into making them appealing as an ingredient.

post #43 of 48
Thread Starter 

now what about them being poison or some types. Had mushrooms growing in my lawn once after started to take care of the lawn using Ringer Fertilizer.  

post #44 of 48
Wild mushrooms are plentiful here, I can often get them for $8-9 lb, fresh out of the forest.
post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post

now what about them being poison or some types. Had mushrooms growing in my lawn once after started to take care of the lawn using Ringer Fertilizer.  
What about it? It's a plain fact.
I would not advise foraging your own mushrooms unless you know what you're doing it are with someone who knows what they're doing.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #46 of 48
Thread Starter 

got my mushrooms today. they came in flip top plastic containers like the salads are sold in. Shiitake must be heaver in weight than Portabella & Porcini, fewer per oz. but they are bigger with no stems. None of the labels say anything about rehydrating which would have been helpful.

post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post

None of the labels say anything about rehydrating which would have been helpful.
Place dry mushrooms in a bowl, barely cover with warm water, let rehydrate for 15-30mn. You can filter (coffee filter) the water after to get a mushroom stock, and use it in your dish too (for example if you make a mushroom risotto).
post #48 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Besides, canned mushrooms taste awful.

Another way to use dehydrated mushrooms is powdering them and use as a condiment.


I can't think on anything canned that tastes good, plus, free from poisons lol

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