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Problem with sharpening knives

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello

I have an electric knife grinder at home. It spins 2 stones, one for sharpening and one for finishing and smoothing of.

However I am still getting a problem getting the knives as sharp as I like. I like to do the paper test. If they cut through paper they are sharp enough. Although sometimes they are that sharp at first they seem to loose sharpness very fast. Some even before I use them even though they are kept in cardboard case that stops them touching other knives.

I use a Sabatier knife and a Victorionox. Neither have the hardest metal but they still should last longer than they are. I think that perhaps it is something I am doing wrong wither in the sharpening or homing part. They are still sharper than a lof of chef knives but any advice would be great on how to get them just that bit sharper.

post #2 of 10
I don't like electric knife sharpeners, largely because I used to work at a place that had a knife sharpener- as apposed to rent-a-knives- and knives would stop holding their edge after a while. Making in neccasary for the cooks to buy a new knife from the knife guy, of course. I think the heat from the stones effects the temper of the metal.
But that may not be your problem. The biggest issue with sharpening your knives is maintaining a consistant angle. If you don't do that, you may have a sharp edge, that lacks strength. Or you might just have a burr or wire edge.
Edit: I use vicorinox and sabatier and they're fine. My vic's usually require regular touch up sharpening and a full sharpen every few weeks.
post #3 of 10

I have a low opinion of those kinds of sharpeners.  There's a place for powered gear; I use a Kalamazoo 1x42 belt grinder quite a bit.  But the dual wheel kind don't work all that well.  Part of the problem is that they don't really deburr which is why the edge doesn't last very long.  And they're not all that versatile.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

That is a bit expensive for me. I think I might just get them professionally done. I use to go to a sharpener he did a very good job.I have just sharpened my knives and spent a while doing it. They are very sharp at the moment and ironically I cut my finger with one, I'll just see how I get on.

Like I said they are sharper than most chefs knives but I like them very sharp.

post #5 of 10
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&rct=j&q=wusthof%20tri%20stone&ved=0ahUKEwiz4b3D_evKAhUM82MKHXFLAWUQFghPMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FWusthof-Gourmet-Tri-Stone-Sharpener%2Fdp%2FB00FH17WX0&usg=AFQjCNFq-TxQp1r09FfESRvRLBkWb048UA

http://www.amazon.com/Gatco-10005-5-Stone-sharpening-system/dp/B001DB9CQS



Here's a couple of options I've used and liked. Just to reiterate, there's a number of reasons I don't like mechanical sharpeners. One being they remove metal too fast. Do what works for you, but I urge you to look at alternatives. I think you get a better feel for sharpening doing it by hand, too.
post #6 of 10
Hey Chris, I feel your pain! There's sharp, and then there's SHARP. I've spent so much money on different devices, cos I've never been any good with a stone, but none have gotten them sharp enough for me. Watching hundreds of YouTube videos on sharpening, I found that every one was different; there's no ONE right way. I figured that that what our comes down to is doing it however you're comfortable and relaxed, so you can repeatedly grind the same angle. I bit the bullet, grabbed an old knife (chefs knives are easiest shape to start), and just practised, and practised... Once it clicked for me I wondered why it had been such a pain in the arse for all these years... Now I find it therapeutic, and pride inducing, maintaining my tools the old fashioned way.. wink.gif
post #7 of 10
You're losing your edge because you have a two stage sharpener. If you want to maintain your edge with an electric sharpener, you need a three stage sharpener.
Edited by Brandon ODell - 2/24/16 at 2:30pm

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #8 of 10

use a stone, not a gadget

post #9 of 10
Lansky sharpening kit. Never have a problem again. I have all my wustofs at a 20 degree bevel. Sharp! Edge lasts month with alittle honing.
post #10 of 10

I agree with 'slabfinder'. I played with 3 stage electric kits before. They do an ok job. But not for the professional edge you'll want. I would never put a high carbon blade through them. Low grade steel like most "cheap" home sets and rentals that could barely hold an edge for more than a day even with honing steel. I learned from good cooks and chefs how to hand sharpen my blades on a whet stone. I usually do it at 21-23 degrees. Depending on the quality of the knife. A soft steel will take 5 minutes from course to fine but dull quickly. I nice high carbon sharpening should just start at medium to fine but take maybe 30 minutes. But last a month depending on how you treat it.

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