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Stollen Baking Pan question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I have been trying to find a stollen baking pan that is shaped like a "wave".  It does not have a centered "hump" on the pan, but the hump is offset to one side of the pan. I ordered pans from Germany, but they, too, have the centered "hill" on the pan.  I found a bakery in IL that had them made in Germany, but I couldn't bribe them to part with one.  Does anyone have a source? This would have made my Großmutter proud.  thanks!

post #2 of 8
Is this what you're talking about?

http://www.amazon.com/Nonstick-Stollen-Pan-12-Inch/dp/B002UAV0XY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1455304252&sr=8-1&keywords=stollen+pan
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

I just wrote to the amazon seller, and this pan also has the "hump" in the center.  Picture is taken from an angle that makes it look like it's the right one.  Thank you for helping.

post #4 of 8

I'm curious.....why a molded pan? Isn't Stollen a braided loaf with another braid on top?

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Generally, stollen is a flat oval-shaped bread dough that is folded over (not quite) in half.  Looks (sort of) like a wave when risen.

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

an appropriately styled pan is placed over the dough (upside down) to keep the shape of the loaf and keep it from "spreading"  too much.  The pan is removed after about 3/4 of the baking time - and finished baking without the pan.

post #7 of 8

I have doNE many.I always usedn the same 20 yr. old broomstick. When I making my last form into a nice loag. I pat a little harder on the left side. I then fold the dough over itself from the left so that the thinner dough is now on the right side. Now place your stick about 3/4 to the right and press the stick into the dough. Press pretty hard. You should end up with a your large hump on the right side of the stollen and the thinner part will fold itself over against the hump. Make sure you use a little flour under the broomstick. Then slather with butter to extract the stick.

They have almost always turned out great for the last 25 yrs.

Sorry I know these picturs suck.

2) is you're dough, flatten out the left edge a little thinner.

Fold over to the right.Place stick 12 and push down quite hard.

This will form 13 the hump and 13 will fold back forward over  the stick.

and the thinner will little section will foldfold back on to the stick the stick in the other directiom. That's it. you may want to go back and lightly mold all the doughs for uniformity.

I understand this is diagram is hard to follow but just go with it and you will love the outcome.

Which I was better drawing things out. Ever since coming back from europe many, many yrs. ago, my stick has hung in  the same place and everyone knows not to touch it. After a few years it takes on it's own character, basically saturated in butter and flour and about 10 times heavier.

  My son keeps telling me I need to put these type of things on tapes so they will be available to the little ones to pass on.


Edited by panini - 2/14/16 at 2:27am
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the wonderful drawing & directions.  Yes, I will try this next time.

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