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Gluten Free Beer

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

What's up ChefTalk, I was reading a piece of advertising on a restaurant drink special table tent, and noticed that the angry orchard subtext mentioned it was gluten free. Then I got to thinking, how many people have a conniption and/or make a spectacle about having only true GF food, and how many of those people drink beer, or a lot of beer and have no problem? I'm willing to bet some of these people are on the same boat who ask for dishes made with animal stock, minus the meat and still toot their horns and wear their (X) years vegetarian/vegan badges on parade every time they go to a restaurant. Thoughts? I would really love a scenario where this plays out with someone I dislike. Magic bullet, say hello to back pocket. :smoking: 

post #2 of 10

For whatever reasons there's definitely a health fad/hype around GF where it's been played up as healthy as opposed to just safe foods for those with Celiac's disease or gluten sensitivity. :mad:

 

I would hope Angry Orchard is gluten free though. They only make hard ciders, right? One of my best friends from college has Celiac's disease so she drinks ciders as opposed to beers.

post #3 of 10

I'm a cook, not a brewer, but isn't beer made with barley?  If so, I'm pretty sure barley does contain gluten.

 

And isn't cider made with apples?  No gluten, right?  Like in the old days when olive oil was advertised as "cholesteral free".

 

Gluten has been around for centuries, as has bread, and pasta.  It is not evil, won't make you fat or stupid.

 

That being said, bromated flour has only been around for a few decades.  Bromated flour gives incredible volume to yeast risen items.  It has been banned in many European countries (Where baker's guilds exist, and people take bread seriously) and has been linked to obesity and other health concerns.  The big burger chains insist on using bromated flour for the burger buns.

 

My last paragraph is just a series of rambling sentences that do not form a coherent thought.  Pay no attention to what I wrote, follow the crowd and bleat "gluten is evil".

 

I need a beer..... 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

I need a beer..... 

 

Good news foodpump! You can have a gluten free beer http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/glutenfreefoodshopping/tp/GlutenFreeBeers.htm

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

 

follow the crowd and bleat "gluten is evil".

 

 

:~)  :~)  :~)

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

  I just started a temporary job as a server at a place that's big on beer, will update y'all on my observations on bread to beer ratios. I just want one customer to act all GF psycho and order 3 tall Guinnesses with their order and drop a bomb on them that they just had a lot gluten, don't blame the hamburger steak on yelp lol... well maybe not after I get off of min wage. 

 

  Oh and thanks on the information on bromated flour @foodpump, I have never heard of it. I've been doing a lot of baking now that I have an oven, mostly roasts but hella cookies too (Off sets quiting drinking, new cookie/coffee addict these days). Is AP bromated?, or is it only found in prepared bread products? Would that be noticeable on the packaging of such flours if its bromated? (lol my spell check wants it to be abominated) "Honey can you pick up 5 pounds of abominated flour at the market?"


Edited by NewOrleansCookJ - 2/18/16 at 5:42am
post #6 of 10

Foodpump, barley does actually contain gluten.  It is a different protein than what it is in wheat, but the body has the same reaction to it.  Rye can also be an issue for some with gluten issues.  I originally thought as you did, thinking that any non-wheat beers would be fine, but after doing some research I found out about the barley.

 

That being said, I think the whole gluten thing is way overblown.  From what I read, only a very small percentage of people actually have issues with gluten, but like many things, its become a trend that many people have jumped on.

post #7 of 10
Yes Pete, I did acknowledge that barley does contain gluten in my second sentence. I know this because the milk chocolate I use contains barley malt extract and I have to declare this on all of my packaging that this is not gluten free. I also have to declare that my bars containing ONLY dark chocolate and buckwheat honey is not vegetarian. But thats another story.....

I know a few people who do have Celiacs, and I understand the implications of gluten and wheat products getting into their systems, and I admire and respect these people.

That being said, Celiacs ocurs in less than 5% of the general population. When then, does well over 40% of the population feel that Gluten is evil? Why was butter evil and margerine "healthy" back in the early '80,s? Then eggs were evil, then animal fats, then came the Atkins diet and meat was king and carbs evil. Maybe the media is evil....

Has anyone actually looked bromated flours? Now that stuff IS evil.....

Vancouver--well I guess the whole West Coast, has no shortage of micro breweries, and I'm on a mission to try them all out.....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

"Is milk good or bad? I rest my case" Lewis Black https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8_JxdE8aHE

post #9 of 10

Learning a lot from this thread :)

I think there is a somewhat bigger part of the general population that has gluten sensitivity http://www.beyondceliac.org/celiac-disease/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity/

 

Oh man, that video. I've become pretty much lactose intolerant in the past year , so...*cough*.

"Approximately 65 percent of the human population has a reduced ability to digest lactose after infancy. Lactose intolerance in adulthood is most prevalent in people of East Asian descent, affecting more than 90 percent of adults in some of these communities. Lactose intolerance is also very common in people of West African, Arab, Jewish, Greek, and Italian descent."

http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/lactose-intolerance

You wouldn't think so from how prevalent milk/dairy is in the US. It's been getting harder to go out to eat, especially near where I work. But such is life :/

Back to my soy-juice I go :suprise: 

post #10 of 10

My doc told me I was "gluten intolerant" so I started researching. It is NOT the gluten, it is the residue of Roundup and the proteins in modern wheat that are not present in older strains. I started grinding my own flour from heirloom wheat and have no problems with it at all. Add in they remove a lot of the stuff in wheat that helps you digest it when you buy commercial flour. And they add all kinds of chemicals!

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