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Bone broth - Page 3

post #61 of 88
Thread Starter 

Here is the excerpt from the book I'm reading, including the recipe.  After reading it carefully and considering your responses I think I have a clear idea of what I'm going to do. The excerpt comes form a book called The Prime, which was written by a neurologist well versed in Ayurveda.  I've been doing the program for a month and bone broth fits into the next stage.

 

"Bone broth is an old remedy for the common cold, but it also a highly mineralizing, nourishing, and anti-inflammatory food.  It is basically just broth made by boiling bones and other parts of the animal that are rich in nutrients, with or without meat on them.  In general, Ayurvedic medicine does not recommend eating meat except in the form of a broth, since bone broth is digestivle and nutrient-rich.  Bone broth contains dissolved minerals that can replenish a malnourished body.  The amino acids in it help rebuild muscle and connective tissue.  Glycine, in particular, helps heal the gut lining when it is damaged and leaky, and there is even some evidence that glycine calms the brain and increases alertness.  It is also a detoxifier, specifically in the liver.  The amino acid proline, also in bone broth, may help clear the arteries of deposits and clean the blood.  Finally, the marrow from the bones is easy to absorb and is a dense source of nutrition.  

 

1 chicken or small turkey carcass, or 3-6 pounds of any meaty bones, with marrow.

2 onions, quartered

4 celery stalks

2 large carrots

1/4-1/2 cup raw apple cider vinegar

1 tbsp himalayan salt

Optional: a few chicken feet

Enough water to cover slow cooker by 2 inches

 

Cook on low for 24-48 hours

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post #62 of 88


This is interesting, thanks for the recipie, Koukouvagia.  Not being a nutritionalist, I wouldn't know if meat would contain more nutrients (amino acids, minerals like iron, and other trace elements) then bone.  However I'm a big believer that all food is medicine, and diet is probably one of the best ways of keeping our health in balance.

 

I have absolutely no idea what raw apple cider vinegar is doing in there, or what function it serves.

 

The phrase "..boiling bones and other parts of the animal..." has the same effect on me as ten girls running their fingernails down the classroom chalkboard. 

 

Since I like what I eat, I always remove scum from my stocks.  This can only be done if the liquid is brought to a near-boil, the scum (dead protein) clumps together and floats to the top, is skimmed off, and the temp turned down again. There is a small window of opportunity for this procedure, and once missed, the scum will cloud your stock and lend it's gritty, bland flavor to the stock. You can only skip this procedure if the animal is young and has been slaughtered within a few hours.  The longer the bones sit around, the more scum the stock will throw off.  

 

I don't know if this procedure can be done in a crockpot.

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post #63 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post


This is interesting, thanks for the recipie, Koukouvagia.  Not being a nutritionalist, I wouldn't know if meat would contain more nutrients (amino acids, minerals like iron, and other trace elements) then bone.  However I'm a big believer that all food is medicine, and diet is probably one of the best ways of keeping our health in balance.

I have absolutely no idea what raw apple cider vinegar is doing in there, or what function it serves.

The phrase "..boiling bones and other parts of the animal..." has the same effect on me as ten girls running their fingernails down the classroom chalkboard. 

Since I like what I eat, I always remove scum from my stocks.  This can only be done if the liquid is brought to a near-boil, the scum (dead protein) clumps together and floats to the top, is skimmed off, and the temp turned down again. There is a small window of opportunity for this procedure, and once missed, the scum will cloud your stock and lend it's gritty, bland flavor to the stock. You can only skip this procedure if the animal is young and has been slaughtered within a few hours.  The longer the bones sit around, the more scum the stock will throw off.  

I don't know if this procedure can be done in a crockpot.

Obviously this recipe is not written by a cook haha. I skim my broth as well just as you describe. It is a tedious yet necessary step. I will continue to make it as I do, which is to poach a whole chicken, remove the meat when it is cooked and make use of it while returning the bones to the stockpot. Ordinarily I'd let the carcass cook for 2 more hours but I guess I will have to cook it much longer than right?

No idea what purpose the vinegar serves either though I cannot imagine it would affect the flavor much.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #64 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

No idea what purpose the vinegar serves either though I cannot imagine it would affect the flavor much.

 

Apple cider vinegar has well documented anti-glycemic effects and is full of probiotics (however I am not sure how much of this is true with prolonged simmering), so that could possibly explain it's inclusion in the recipe; but I am not well versed in Ayurveda, so I am merely shooting in the dark.

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post #65 of 88
The role of the Apple Cider vinegar is (allegedly) to help suck nutrients out of the bones and into the broth.  
post #66 of 88
Thread Starter 
The recipe actually says "drizzle the vinegar over the bones and then add the water." I hate steps like this because there is no explanation of why. Why can't I put the water first and then the vinegar, will there be that much difference to the end result? Probably not I assume. This is a pretty basic stock too, does this mean I have to omit my other favorite things liken bay leaves, a garlic clove, thyme, leeks and a squirt of tomato paste?

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post #67 of 88

Once again guessing here, but probably to aid in assuring a good release of impurities (scum). Old school stock usually called for blanching the bones before actually proceeding with making stock, to insure a clearer stock. So probably reasoning along those lines is the reason for the drizzle first..

 

Do it both ways and then determine for yourself if a difference is noticed.

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post #68 of 88

I have a tendency to overthink things which can get in the way of my cooking sometimes. Water first, then bones, or bones first, then water. I mean come on Layne, it is just cooking, not life or death. I do lots of side by side comparisons in an effort to give my overthinking brain some peace. :~)

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post #69 of 88

Problem here is if the claim that the vinegar helps suck more nutrients from the bones to the broth is correct you may or may not notice it in a side-by-side comparison test, as there may be no difference in flavor, color or body between one bone broth and another one that has a little more nutrients in it.

post #70 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I hate steps like this because there is no explanation of why. 


I'm with you on that. Very frustrating. 

post #71 of 88

Here's one source: Please note the addition of vinegar. Not only are fats are ideally combined with acids like vinegar, but when it comes to making broth, the vinegar helps leech all those valuable minerals from the bones into the stockpot water, which is ultimately what you'll be eating. The goal is to extract as many minerals as possible out of the bones into the broth water. Bragg's raw apple cider vinegar is a good choice as it's unfiltered and unpasteurized.

 

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/12/16/bone-broth-benefits.aspx

post #72 of 88

I have read recipes for beef stock where adding vinegar improves/speeds up gelatin extraction, hence one would think improves protein content of the finished product.

post #73 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Problem here is if the claim that the vinegar helps suck more nutrients from the bones to the broth is correct you may or may not notice it in a side-by-side comparison test, as there may be no difference in flavor, color or body between one bone broth and another one that has a little more nutrients in it.


[*disclaimer* please don't take offense, I am just being a knucklehead who got a good chuckle (in a good way)]

 

the website is ChefTalk not NutritionistTalk so we are way out of my pay grade :~) :lol::roll::chef: 

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post #74 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

[*disclaimer* please don't take offense, I am just being a knucklehead who got a good chuckle (in a good way)]

Not taking offense, but not sure what you found funny. I was being serious. 
post #75 of 88
Thread Starter 
Food is many things. It's pleasure, nourishment, tradition, culture, expression, and many other things to many other people not is also the most potent form of medicine and nutrition. It is what it is.
I think @Rick Alan would enjoy this discussion.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #76 of 88

Yes I've been following.  I did a few "bone broth fasts" myself to heal an inflamed gut.  Boy, years of misery turned around with just a very temporary alterations in food intake.

 

Don't Take Lightly the Power of the BONE!  And cartilage, and some other few considerations.

post #77 of 88

As to instructions I didn't chime in on this one as I have no idea what the Ayurvedics are looking for.  For my regimen it was just bone and the more cartilage the better.

post #78 of 88
Love this video by the way! I think it boils down to the clarity of the stock, I use no meat when making stock. Just a deep roast on the bone and a good browning of mirepoix (celery, carrot and onion).
post #79 of 88
ve this video by the way! I think it boils down to the clarity of the stock, I use no meat when making stock. Just a deep roast on the bone and a good browning of mirepoix (celery, carrot and onion).
post #80 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post
 

You don't understand the difference because you're not a hipster. Bone broth is just the hipster term for stock or broth. Our fore bearers made home made goods by baking and canning and entered them in the county fair to win a blue ribbon and bragging rights. Now what they did to feed the family is called artisanal and you can charge more for it. 

Enjoy your bone broth, however you make it. 

 

this. just don't tell the brooklyn hipsters or their heads might explode. 

post #81 of 88
Thread Starter 
So I'm making this bone broth today and I'm not sure how long to cook it. When I make chicken stock I let it cook for about 3 hrs. I don't have a slow cooker, which suggests a 24-48 hr cook, just a regular stock pot.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #82 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

So I'm making this bone broth today 


Apparently if you look up Ayurvedic bone broth recipes they simmer it for a looooong time, much longer than stock. I would try 12 to 24 hours. Here's one source, but google has tons of them: http://www.high50.com/health/bone-broth-should-you-eat-it-and-how-did-it-become-the-first-health-food-trend-of-2015

 

.... or you could try Brandon's technique if you have a pressure cooker? http://www.cheftalk.com/t/88752/bone-broth#post_530230

post #83 of 88
Thread Starter 
I'm making chicken. We had this for dinner last night so I had a carcass ready for the stockpot.

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post #84 of 88

13 hours in slow cooker (210F) pretty much dissolves all cartilage and leaves bones a mush.  I start with cold water bringing to boil on stove and transfer to slow cooker, skim along the way. Strain/press thru 4 layers of cheese cloth, let additional scum rise and skim.  Reduce by 1/3 to remove unwanted volatiles.


Edited by Rick Alan - 3/4/16 at 5:53pm
post #85 of 88
Thread Starter 

I do not have a slow cooker.  It's been on since 2pm.  I'll leave it till morning.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #86 of 88
Thread Starter 

Here it is, it went in at 2pm yesterday and got taken off the flame at 7am.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #87 of 88

Gorgeous koukou!

 

mimi

post #88 of 88

I made a batch from turkey backs sans skin and oysters.  I roasted the backs for 20min. with half an onion, a carrot and two large cloves of garlic.  Transferred that to my crock pot and topped with cold water, whole pepper corns, thyme sprigs and fresh parsley then sealed the top with cling and set my PID for 195f and let it run for 48hrs.

 

 

When done I lifted out the backs, veg and aromatics and let rest.  Then I ladled it into different containers.  The large one is the top 2/3rds., the smaller one the last 1/3rd. and the measuring cup was strained through cheese cloth.  I'm very impressed with the process and the end result.  Rich, velvety and unctuous describes it pretty well.  I noticed that bone near an articulation had crumbled - it had given up its mineral content which I believe is the Ayurvedic goal of "Bone Broth".

 

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