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How to stop your Guacamole from turning brown

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Please share your ideas on how to prevent guacamole from turning brown.  I have one helpful hint which I will share later on but am very keen to hear others........

post #2 of 21
Share now or I won't bother replying!
post #3 of 21
It's all about stopping oxidation. Acid will help so you often see lime juice added for this as well as flavor. Grinding up a vitaminC tablet will do much the same. Pressing plastic cling wrap tightly to the surface to prevent contact with air.

Putting the pit in the guacamole, not so much.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 21

Come on, don't play hard to get!

post #5 of 21
I second the plastic wrap. I've seen others melt butter and pour on top to form a seal, then when it fully chilled the next day, the butter can be removed in one piece and discarded. It works, but plastic is easier and more practical.

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post #6 of 21
We discussed this topic a while ago: http://www.cheftalk.com/t/71908/transporting-guacamole
post #7 of 21
My hint, which is the one true answer, hasn't been written yet - in this thread or the prior one. Ha ha ha.
post #8 of 21
Eat it all in one sitting.

Do we win prizes?
post #9 of 21
Dang it, Cerise... You stole my thunder!
post #10 of 21
Waiting so long was quite a blunder.
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Dang it, Cerise... You stole my thunder!

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post #12 of 21

Blend is some sodium bisulfite. Keeps it green!

post #13 of 21

Sodium bisulfite is also added to leafy green vegetables in salad bars and elsewhere, to preserve apparent freshness, under names like LeafGreen. The concentration is sometimes high enough to cause severe allergic reactions.

On July 8, 1986, sodium bisulfite was banned from use by the FDA on fresh fruits and vegetables in the United States following the deaths of 13 people and many illnesses, mainly among asthmatics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 

Blend is some sodium bisulfite. Keeps it green!

I like Cerise's answer best.  The information above is from Wikipedia. 

post #14 of 21

Cerise's answer is the best-eat it all in one sitting-in other words only make what you need for the moment.  Failing that then I'm a firm believer in plastic wrap pressed tight against the surface-make sure you smooth the surface.  Also adding lime juice to it, which I do anyway for flavor.  I'm not a big fan of vitamin C or other preservatives as I feel that it does alter the fresh taste of it.  Even with added lime juice and the plastic wrap there usually is small layer of guac that has turned brown, just scrape it off.  When you go to store it, you have to make sure to really pack it into the container so that there are no air bubbles, and then I press a piece of plastic into the surface and then use another piece to cover the container.

post #15 of 21
I puree avocado with lime juice, season then vacume pack and make sure no air bubbles. It also freezes beautifully and keeps it bright green luscious colour.
post #16 of 21

There is really nothing that will stop your Guacamole from turning brown. everything mentioned only delays this discoloration, The best thing to do id eat it right after you made it : but then it turns brown too.

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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post #17 of 21
Aaahhh, so this was a trick question after all!
post #18 of 21

I make guac daily. I have found this to be fool proof for

 

1. the container needs to be air tight and it HAS to be full. Like the guac hiting the lid full. <--- This works suprisingly well. I have a container in the fridge now from two days ago that is vibrant green.

2. expect to make it daily.

 

As soon as you begin to use it, and the container is no longer full - expect browning. If you are in restaurant setting, you pretty much need to make it daily (from my experience). Home setting, just make it the day of.

post #19 of 21

the vacume pack comment from above is an awesome Idea, im excited to try that.

 

What type of vacume sealer do you use?

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

It's all about stopping oxidation. Acid will help so you often see lime juice added for this as well as flavor. Grinding up a vitaminC tablet will do much the same. Pressing plastic cling wrap tightly to the surface to prevent contact with air.

Putting the pit in the guacamole, not so much.


I was about to ask her about the lemons she is using, though I always use lime, (green lemons), the 'yellow' lemon is much more acid, I never had problem though about it browning, maybe I eat it too fast too lol

post #21 of 21
It's a professional one at work cant remember the name and I add freshly squeezed lime juice and season. Once its in the bag I use the back of my knife to push it and press it with my hands to ensure there are no air bubbles. Hope this helps.
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