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potato masher suggestion

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I am looking to replace a failing old potato masher we use to make mash potato's. I am looking at these two products and would like any comments or suggestions

 

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/all-clad-professional-potato-masher/?pkey=e|potato%2Bsmasher|105|best|0|1|24||4&cm_src=PRODUCTSEARCH 

 

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/rosle-potato-masher/?pkey=e|potato%2Bsmasher|105|best|0|1|24||2&cm_src=PRODUCTSEARCH   

 

 

 

I have a few other allclad kitchen utensils that I have been very pleased with quality wise, though they are quite pricey.

post #2 of 14

As far as I know the bigger the fissures the better for your hand, I always had issues with models like the Rosler as they are also messier to handle

post #3 of 14

$50 bucks for a potato masher????? I have a $5 one in the drawer that's 20 yrs old and makes mashers just as good.

post #4 of 14

Go to an estate sale and buy one for .50-1.00.  My potato masher was given to me buy a friend estimated age 50 + years.

New Star Foodservice 37654 Commercial Grade Potato Masher, 18-Inch, Square

 
 
 

Price:$5.80 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details

Amazon

 

This looks like a good one for less than six.

post #5 of 14
Shop around. I have a black silicone multiple-piece set (spatula, ladle, spoon, pasta thingie, etc.) cooking utensils. Don't recall the price, but it was reasonable, doesn't scratch cookware, and withstands high temps. Check out Bed, Bath & Beyond, etc.
Edited by Cerise - 2/27/16 at 9:01am
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

$50 bucks for a potato masher????? I have a $5 one in the drawer that's 20 yrs old and makes mashers just as good.


I guess you never mashed Yukon "Gold" Potatoes Son! The 99 cent store has them. I checked in the dollar store but those were to expensive...Hove a good day my boy!

post #7 of 14

We were at a Christmas dinner last year and the hostess didn't have a masher.  One other guest and I took turns whipping them with a wooden spoon.  The hostess is lactose intolerant so I used pan drippings and everyone commented on how good they tasted.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

$50 bucks for a potato masher????? I have a $5 one in the drawer that's 20 yrs old and makes mashers just as good.

 

Thanks buba... I was afraid I was going to continue reading this thread and find out I can't come to CT anymore because my potato masher was not of the proper lineage lol.

I have browsed thru WS a handful of times and walked out empty handed every time.

The prices are ridiculous.

 

mimi

post #9 of 14

A cheap wavy style is great. 

 

If money is no object, buy a Roesle food mill or ricer. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

A cheap wavy style is great. 

If money is no object, buy a Roesle food mill or ricer. 

Amen; I even use the wavy masher to break up the ground beef before adding the Manwich!

But money isn't my criteria for the ricer; smoothness of the mashed potato is.
post #11 of 14

Way back when it was fashionable I collected all the kitchen hand tools with the chipped green paint on wood handles.

No longer have any except the potato masher.

Does whatever I need it to do at 60 plus years old.

:beer:

 

Umm the masher...not me lol.

 

mimi

post #12 of 14

There are decent ricers and food mills for $25-50, but how does an ordinary food processor do here (never had one)?

 

Not completely happy with my wavy-wire masher, and I'd like to try Robuchon potatoes sometime.  You see him using a food mill, wisk and drum sieve.

post #13 of 14

food processor for mashed potatoes is a bad thing. Gummy starchy disaster as you rupture the cells rather than just breaking them apart from each other (mostly).

 

I learned this lesson first trying a potato bread recipe in the FP. Was  not successful. Later, read a Thanksgiving article by Harold McGee where he explained why the FP is not ideal for potato mash. 

 

Food mill or ricer makes smooth fluffy potatoes. A little less dense usually and more regular. But I like a little texture to my mashed potatoes in general. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #14 of 14
I just use a stiff wire whisk when I want texture--like skin on smashed with bacon--and an old food mill on the rare occasion that I want then very smooth
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