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assistance before I purchase a knife

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I have been attempting to make a decision on buying a knife for some time now. I am now certian That I will purchase one within the next two weeks. I will give you as much info as possible.

 

I am an at home cook, with some action in a restaurant on rare occasion. I dice mainly vegetables.

 

Aside from a victronox paring knife I picked up a few months ago that I am using basically as a chef knife ( I know I know), the only set of knives I currently have is a very old, never been sharpened set of Jesco mastercut 2. I would attribute it to one of those sets that they sell on late night infomercials as a knife set that 'never' has to be sharpened. They are junk. Not sharp what so ever. The Victronox is awesome however.

 

I have never used sharpening stones, but plan to learn. This is important because I dont want to buy a super expensive first time knife that I will learn how to sharpen on and possible mess up.  I am purchasing something like a Bester 1200 and a higher grit Gesshin. Something around 4k if they make it.

 

I have been told by a local that my current cutting boards, plastic, may be harder on the edge of the knife than something like wood. I'm not sure that this is true. I havent seen many people making this claim here. I am not currently considering picking up a wood cutting board.

 

 

These are the knives I am looking at. I would like to stay below 150.

 

Tojiro DP  -http://www.amazon.com/Tojiro-DP-Gyutou-8-2-21cm/dp/B000UAPQGS/ref=sr_1_2?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1456579000&sr=1-2&keywords=japanese+chef+knife   


Currently 44 bucks on AMZ

 

 

Maybe a Yoshihiro VG10 at around 130
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D6DVTM6/ref=psdc_14309861_t3_B000UAPQGS 
 

 

I know a lot of people recommend the Fujiwara FKM - but it looks like normal retail for this is around 260 which seems like it may be to high to spend on a first knife purchase considering im learning to sharpen on it.

 

Im leaning towards the tojiro DP due to price and popularity.

post #2 of 6
I think you may be looking at the Teruyasu Fujiwara who is more of a small shop high end maker. Totally different knives than the Fujiwara FKM which I would be surprised if you were not finding for $80 bucks or under. Check Japanese Chefs Knife.

Yes Gesshin stones go up to 4k and more, but give Jon a call to understand which of the higher grit stones might suit you the best (soak vs splash and go, muddy or not muddy, general feel)

Plastic either seems to run too soft or too hard. too hard hurts the the edge for obvious reasons, and the soft ones you'll cut grooves into which might make the knife edge bind into and torque during a cut. And anyways you get scars in the board which are harder to sanitize. I'd wager most the regs here cut on wood boards at home since we have awesome knives that we love.
post #3 of 6

The High-soft boards, and some similar stuff, are a whole different synthetic.  These are as easy on your knives as any wood boards as I am led to understand.  And of course they are not cheap.

post #4 of 6

Yeah Fujiwara FKM is not that expensive

 

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/FKMSeries.html

 

 

Most of the time I cut on wood, but sometimes if you're cutting meat or something wet, it's easier to just use synthetic because it's easier to clean.  The two best non wood options are Hi Soft or Sani Tuff.

 

I would say Hi Soft is softer than Sani-Tuff.  Both are softer than wood and "grab" your knife a little bit when you cut.

 

Hi soft:

http://korin.com/sushi_bar/Cutting-Boards_4

 

Sani Tuff is on amazon, but check your local restaurant supply stores, I've seen it cheaper than online

 

If you go wood, get a tight grained hard wood end grain board. FYI Stay away from bamboo

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Yeah Fujiwara FKM is not that expensive

 

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/FKMSeries.html

 

 

Most of the time I cut on wood, but sometimes if you're cutting meat or something wet, it's easier to just use synthetic because it's easier to clean.  The two best non wood options are Hi Soft or Sani Tuff.

 

I would say Hi Soft is softer than Sani-Tuff.  Both are softer than wood and "grab" your knife a little bit when you cut.

 

Hi soft:

http://korin.com/sushi_bar/Cutting-Boards_4

 

Sani Tuff is on amazon, but check your local restaurant supply stores, I've seen it cheaper than online

 

If you go wood, get a tight grained hard wood end grain board. FYI Stay away from bamboo

would you recommend the FKM over the Tojorio DP? If so, why?

post #6 of 6
Tojiro DP is awesome. Spend the 44 bucks. Its a knife.
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