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raspberry ganache truffles

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I need to make desserts for next week Sunday for my daughter's school choir dessert auction. One of them is going to be raspberry truffles, and I wondered how far in advance I can make them and how to store them. I bought the raspberries last night because the store doesn't always have them, and want to make them soon-ish before the berries go bad. My recipe is very simple, but will factor in to the shelf life of the truffles.

 

Ganache: 1 part heavy cream, 2 parts semi-sweet baking chocolate

Fill fresh raspberries with pea-sized balls of soft chevre and one tiny piece white chocolate. I have store-bought chocolate shells that look like empty Reese's cups to put the raspberries in, one per shell. Top with a few drops of honey. Fill with ganache. Chill until set.

(If the shells don't work, the plan is to put a little ganache into paper mini-muffin liners, then put in the raspberries, and cover with more ganache.)

 

So, how long will they keep? In the fridge or sealed up on the counter? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I've made these once before, but on the day they were given as a gift, so have no clue about the best way to store them.

post #2 of 13

I would say sealed IN THE FRIDGE. Even though is winter, is always better to keep it cool, raspberries are quite acid and they may get fast way too sour when exposed to indoor temperatures depending on how warm is inside your home. I would not take the risk. Sealed inside the fridge will prevent it from getting that fridge taste.

post #3 of 13

Has this worked for you before?

 

I would worry about the raspberry breaking down and there's no way for you to tell.  Filling that raspberry might be a lot of handling, and raspberries do not like that much handling.  Plus the ganache is going to be a bit warm.  If it were me, I would go with your chevre and white chocolate inside a raspberry fondant.

 

But just in case you're going to go with your original idea I would just create them a few hours before the event.  The ganache won't take that long to cool and you can get away with room temperature because there are a lot of solids in your ganache.

post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Has this worked for you before?

 

I would worry about the raspberry breaking down and there's no way for you to tell.  Filling that raspberry might be a lot of handling, and raspberries do not like that much handling.  Plus the ganache is going to be a bit warm.  If it were me, I would go with your chevre and white chocolate inside a raspberry fondant.

 

But just in case you're going to go with your original idea I would just create them a few hours before the event.  The ganache won't take that long to cool and you can get away with room temperature because there are a lot of solids in your ganache.


Indeed, I don't know how easy would it be for him to handle raspberries fresh, he could optionally freeze it inside vacuum bags and handle them like that.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

I have made these before, and filling the raspberries was quick and easy because the chevre was rolled into balls small enough to fit with minimal handling. The ganache didn't seem to affect them much. I ate several, and the friend I gave them to requested the recipe. My question was more about how long they'd keep. Thanks for the suggestions, though. Also, FYI, I'm a "she," not a "he." ;)

post #6 of 13

They would keep as long as a raspberry will keep?  That is my guess.  I would still make every effort to buy the freshest and make them as close to the event as possible.

 

Sorry for the non answer.  :D

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Kuan! Hopefully our store will have raspberries again next Friday. We live in the middle of nowhere so it's iffy sometimes.

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

The other recipes I'm making for the auction are a Cherry Chip Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting, a Thin Mint Cake with Peppermint Buttercream (with Girl Scout Cookies crushed up and mixed in the cake!) and a German Chocolate Pecan Pie. Will try to post photos when they're all finished.

post #9 of 13

I would be hesitant to include anything that has even a remote possibility of going off.

Like raspberries and cheese.

You have heard the old saying "when in doubt throw it out"?

It stands in great for a situation like this when you have no clue how the auction winner will treat the item.

IMO it looks kinda bad to donate an item that needs a warning label.

Just sayin'.

 

mimi


Edited by flipflopgirl - 2/28/16 at 9:19am
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

I plan on winning the truffles, so that shouldn't be a problem. Three years ago, I paid $40 for my own cake on purpose. The money is for a good cause, so I don't mind. My mother-in-law bought my chocolate bacon cake last year because she knew how good it was, and one year there was almost a bidding war for my cinnamon roll apple pie. The kids sing while we eat cupcakes and cookies, then the best desserts are auctioned off. It's actually kind of fun!

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jen clark View Post
 

I have made these before, and filling the raspberries was quick and easy because the chevre was rolled into balls small enough to fit with minimal handling. The ganache didn't seem to affect them much. I ate several, and the friend I gave them to requested the recipe. My question was more about how long they'd keep. Thanks for the suggestions, though. Also, FYI, I'm a "she," not a "he." ;)


Ooops sorry ma'am :blush:

post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 

Not a problem. Here's a pic of the first time I made these, before the ganache stage. The friend I made them for was diabetic, so I skipped the white chocolate and just did a very small drop of honey and used semi-sweet for the ganache. She loved them! The beginning stage of Raspberry Chevre Ganache truffles the first time I made them.

post #13 of 13

Those would work well with a crisp white wine or champagne as a passed item (sans the chocolate) at a gallery opening or maybe a pre brunch tidbit.

Maybe I will steal this and add a tiny drop of almond oil in with the cheese.

Thanks :thumb: 

 

mimi

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