or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › How do you reheat?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How do you reheat?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

I thought this might be a fun topic as some of my methods raise eyebrows on occasion.  I wanted to reheat two Pasties tonight without firing up the oven.  Since I use a dry skillet and lid to reheat sliced of pizza (best way I've found) I employed a similar technique to the Pasties.

 

Fry pan with lid - I made three balls of tin foil to elevate a diner plate then reheated the Pasties on some parchment - worked like a charm.

 

 

 

 

When steam started coming out they were done and the crust was still crisp.

post #2 of 27
Is there water in that pan too? I'll have to try the pan pizza method, I usually stick it on the oven.

I use my microwave a lot.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 27
A mini stovetop oven. Ingenious.
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Is there water in that pan too? I'll have to try the pan pizza method, I usually stick it on the oven.

I use my microwave a lot.

 

No water - dry pan and a low flame.  Water would have steamed them to death.  Yeah the pizza slices usually go on a piece of foil for easy cleanup again and a low flame.  Try this KK you will never use a microwave for pizza again ever.  

 

A mini stove top oven is exactly what it is Brian and it works beautifully with so much less energy.

post #5 of 27

I put pizza in the oven, not the microwave.  I try never to put any bread like food into the microwave, it makes it chewy and hard.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 

My bad - I miss read your post KK.  

post #7 of 27

Ingenious. Will try it. Isn't it hard on the pot?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #8 of 27

What a great idea. I would never have thought it would work. Now I'm looking for something to experiment with.  

I typically use the microwave or the toaster oven. 

post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 

@ordo It's a stainless pot with a very thick bottom.  The trick is to use a low flame.  I've been reheating foods like this for years now and have never had a problem.  I probably wouldn't do this with an enameled dutch oven.

 

@chefwriter I don't have room for a toaster oven hence thinking outside the box.

 

Lets hear some more ideas -

post #10 of 27

After taking a closer look I think I have the exact same pan.  

Here in the Northeast I've often thought about using the radiators but haven't figured that one out yet. 

post #11 of 27
Chambers, the American stove company, had a similar concept in the 1950s. The called it "thermo-baker", I believe, and fit in their proprietary Thermowell... Which was an early version of a slow cooker. I had a Chambers range for 20 years (and it was great to cook and bake with) but never found the thermowell accessories. That was before eBay. That range is one of only a few regrets I have in life - when we sold the house I should have kept the Chambers range!

http://www.chamberstoves.net/Features.html
Edited by BrianShaw - 3/2/16 at 8:00am
post #12 of 27

Following this good idea, i used a cast iron pan and a grill pan (heat accumulators) to create a small oven. Both heated smoking point. Worked marvelously!

 

 

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #13 of 27

But if i have to tell the truth, my small electric oven is better.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #14 of 27
Great tip!
I shall have to try this soon with my less wide but taller pan and see if it still works.
post #15 of 27

Neat Idea. For a single slice or few items. I don't have room for a toaster oven either. 

I've used the radiator (in winter, obviously) and even the sun, when it comes into my kitchen window to bring things to room temp or help defrost. 

My wok is on the radiator, and it has the lid from an al clad saute pan on it. Sometimes I put a plate of something in it and put the lid on. 

 

Will the next thread be cooking on a manifold?

post #16 of 27

I've seen beef steaks done over the ship boiler.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 

Dry pan is the best way I've found to reheat leftover french fries too.  They have enough oil on them already so they crisp while the insides heat.  

post #18 of 27

I reheat pizza directly on the dry pan, not elevated.  It crisps the crust a little more while the toppings heat well due to the lid.

 

Elevating a plate is such a great idea for so many other leftovers.  Thanks Mike.

If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
Reply
If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
Reply
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 

My pizza goes direct too - I elevate dense things that I don't want to burn on the bottom like Pasties, knishes, etc.  

post #20 of 27
I do the same thing for pizza as well. Direct on dry pan, lid on for a portion then finish crust open lid (if you need the extra time)

Works great for thin crust to Chicago style.

Reheating pulled pork, I put in a vacuum sealer bag and heat gently in a water bath. I've been doing this long before I got my sous vide. The most gentle, flavor and texture method I've found for reheating pulled pork and other bbq items.

Good idea incorporating raising some foods, I'll keep this in mind
post #21 of 27
Our favorite pizza has a rather thin crust so dry heat can over-crisp it. I've done it that way but, when the pizza is already a bit over cooked from being kept warm, I've tried something different lately. I heat my oven to around 425 and put room temp slices on a pizza pan (with holes in it) for 2-3 minutes, then turn the heat down til hot. If the slices are over-crispy-edged from too much warming the night before, a short microwave ride will soften them just enough beforehand.
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 

Stove top Bain Marie - great for reheating cooked pasta.

 

post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonefishin View Post

I do the same thing for pizza as well. Direct on dry pan, lid on for a portion then finish crust open lid (if you need the extra time)

Works great for thin crust to Chicago style.

Reheating pulled pork, I put in a vacuum sealer bag and heat gently in a water bath. I've been doing this long before I got my sous vide. The most gentle, flavor and texture method I've found for reheating pulled pork and other bbq items.

Good idea incorporating raising some foods, I'll keep this in mind
When I reheat pulled pork I place it in a bowl with a tbsp of water and place it in the microwave. It works out really well I swear it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

When I reheat pulled pork I place it in a bowl with a tbsp of water and place it in the microwave. It works out really well I swear it.

Ditto. Usually with low and slow micowaving too

Sometimes same process on the stovetop. But must be careful to avoid handling it too much and turning it into mush.
post #25 of 27

I don't have a microwave.

I use my small electrical oven at times, but mostly I use the stove top.

I use a cast iron pot for reheating most stuff, just like @Mike9

 

As for Pizza:

Left over pizza? Is there such a thing?

If it is there, I generally eat it cold.

 

Leftover rice I pus in a colander over a pot of boiling water.

Leftover pasta gets reheated on fairly hot flame inside the sauce (or becomes a pasta soup).

 

Most of my leftovers get turned into another meal the next day.

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Ditto. Usually with low and slow micowaving too

Sometimes same process on the stovetop. But must be careful to avoid handling it too much and turning it into mush.
Not only that but it can scorch too and it also changes the texture of the pulled pork.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #27 of 27

I've always been disappointed trying to reheat fried items.

 

Finally settled on our convection oven preheated to 375* or so, wire rack in a sheet pan,  and have pretty good results with onion rings from our favorite restaurant, french fries, and fried calamari.   

 

I'm going to try the cast-iron pan metrhod for future pizza leftovers.

 

MikeLM

travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › How do you reheat?