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Seafood Broth

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Had a company dinner at the Ritz Carlton in Florida. The catering staff was amazing of course. One of the courses was a halibut on top of fennel in a seafood broth. The chef describe the broth but he called it something else. He defined it has a broth but the name was different. I have been searching for the name for a couple of days but I cannot recall it. Any suggestions?
post #2 of 11

Was it fumet (pronounced foo-may)?

post #3 of 11

Fumet?

 

mimi

 

edit... Pete you slid into home while I was searching thru the Ritz menus!

 

m.

post #4 of 11

Nage or court-bouillon?


Edited by Cerise - 3/7/16 at 7:00am
post #5 of 11

Pete is probably correct again.

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

Pete is probably correct again.

 

LOL!!!!  Could you tell that to my wife?  According to her, I'm never right!!!

 

If it was a fish stock, then fumet would be the correct, classical term, but Nage would be a good guess too, as Cerise stated.  It became a really popular term in the mid 1990's to describe just about any light broth, whether vegetable (of any kind), fish, shellfish, chicken, beef or game, used to sauce a dish with.

post #7 of 11
Scott Conant serves (served?)? a dish like that at his Las Vagas restaurant. He calls it "crazy water"... In Italian, of course.
post #8 of 11

Halibut a la nage?  Pete my wife thinks I right as I agree with her.

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

Halibut a la nage?  Pete my wife thinks I right as I agree with her.


You would think that after 16 years of marriage I would get that concept, but sometimes I'm too stubborn for my own good!!

post #10 of 11

Pete,

 

I don't know how long it took me to learn but I do know life was easier after I did.  Two words make a happy marriage, yes dear.  38 years together and loving it. 

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for you help!!!!

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