or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › What to do with an extra large amount of pre scrambled eggs (dinner service)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What to do with an extra large amount of pre scrambled eggs (dinner service) - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Thread Starter 
I do have a new job so this works out nicely.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post

Ugh, please don't "no call no show." You don't have to let others' poor behavior justify your own poor behavior. Just give 2 weeks notice like any good employee. No call no show reflects poorly on you, no matter what the circumstances. 

I guess I don't care if it seems bad on me. I was a dedicated employee and find that they don't value me at all. I have no reason to waste any more of my time there and won't. I gave them a month notice two weeks ago, they have already hired the cook to replace me(who is making more money then I am) and I'm sure the restaurant will be just fine without me. I am not obligated to be a good employee to someone who has not been a good employer to me.
post #32 of 44

Not passing judgement, just my experience, I would never hire someone who had "no called/no showed" a previous employer for any reason.

 

It might feel good at the present, but it doesn't show well in the future.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexisanaiss View Post

I do have a new job so this works out nicely.
I guess I don't care if it seems bad on me. I was a dedicated employee and find that they don't value me at all. I have no reason to waste any more of my time there and won't. I gave them a month notice two weeks ago, they have already hired the cook to replace me(who is making more money then I am) and I'm sure the restaurant will be just fine without me. I am not obligated to be a good employee to someone who has not been a good employer to me.

I agree that you are not justified to behave poorly. These things come back to bite you in one way or another. This may actually be your opportunity to speak up for yourself and tell the boss that this is your last day and that you are leaving because you weren't treated well. Have your say and walk out proudly with the upper hand. You won't be teaching them any lesson if you scramble like a rat. The only thing you have true control over is your own reputation.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #34 of 44

I agree with the others here. Never ever pull a "no show no call". This is not about your employer it's about you as an individual. Find another job and give appropriate notice.  A reputation can follow you for years. It never ceases to amaze me how I can be in the most out of the way place and run into some one I knew 30 + years ago. Most people have a long memory for stuff like this and just about the time you think all is forgotten an event like this can come back up out of no where. Not what you want when applying for a future job you really want. I'd also suggest that any time you are at work you give 100% no matter how much you disagree with or dislike the Chef/owner etc. Never give some one else so much power over you, that you begin to alter the way you behave or perform. Take the opportunity to rise above and move on.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

Unfortunately, legality issues in these litigious times.

I read an article where a woman was creating an app where restaurants can give away extra food without the legal ramifications. Same with supermarkets. They give it away free of sell it at a whopping discount. Schools, homeless shelters, etc. The app facilitates the supplier with the needy. 

 

They are re-visiting the liability aspect.

post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexisanaiss View Post

I do have a new job so this works out nicely.
I guess I don't care if it seems bad on me. I was a dedicated employee and find that they don't value me at all. I have no reason to waste any more of my time there and won't. I gave them a month notice two weeks ago, they have already hired the cook to replace me(who is making more money then I am) and I'm sure the restaurant will be just fine without me. I am not obligated to be a good employee to someone who has not been a good employer to me.


When your in the growing years of your career use each experience as a stepping stone to the bigger prize. Each restaurant you work at is a learning experience on how you will manage and chef your own someday. During this process you will work under many chefs that aren't real good manages. If anything, learn how you "don't" want to manage and "be like" when you get there. Learning comes in many forms, learn from them all. Someday you will look back at this an remember how you felt when treated poorly. These are the growing pains we all go through when building our character on how we manage our employees with fairness in the future. I know how much you care about fairness and being treated like an equal in this business. I wouldn't waste my time trying to change these chefs, their views are already set in stone. The one thing I always did when leaving any restaurant I was involved. I always made sure I left with as much class and I entered. I always wanted to make sure the restaurant was better for me being there. If it wasn't then I just wasted my time and there's..........The best to you and your little one. ...Chef Bill

post #37 of 44
Thread Starter 
I gave them my 100% for 9 months. I have them my 200% when we didn't have a sous chef for 6 of those months. I have them my 100% when they promised me a raise. My daughter and I are forced to leave Chicago now because I left my better paying job for them and can no longer afford to pay rent. At 25 years old I am moving in with my mom...I gave them all I had because I genuinely cared about this restaurant. I volunteered my free time to help with advertising and marketing and have never missed a shift. I'm always available when someone else isn't and I slaved away many nights missing out with my daughter so we could struggle to pay the bills. They have time and time again treated me poorly. In December they cut my hours from 38-45 a week to 10 with no warning. I understand it happens in slow seasons, but that wasn't the reason here. Maybe one day I'll be more mature, but for now I feel terrible and I most certainly won't be investing a single minute of my time on them.
post #38 of 44
Sure, they screwed you, but you bought the ticket and took the ride. You decided against taking a better job despite the way you'd been treated. If you walk out, you lose the reference; it hurts you more than it will them.
The more time I've spent in this business, the less I've tried to take my work personally. It's a cash for labor transaction. Sure, I look for jobs I like & am inteterested in, and sure, I give 100%, but that's the job. I wouldn't feel bad/guilty about quitting- but it's also not their fault you didn't leave sooner. Chalk it up to a lesson learned, I suppose.
post #39 of 44
Do what Rocky did
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexisanaiss View Post


 I don't care 

 

That's the worst thing you can ever say as a cook/chef. 

 

Good luck to you in the future, sounds like you'll need it. 

post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

Sure, they screwed you, but you bought the ticket and took the ride. You decided against taking a better job despite the way you'd been treated. If you walk out, you lose the reference; it hurts you more than it will them.
The more time I've spent in this business, the less I've tried to take my work personally. It's a cash for labor transaction. Sure, I look for jobs I like & am interested in, and sure, I give 100%, but that's the job. I wouldn't feel bad/guilty about quitting- but it's also not their fault you didn't leave sooner. Chalk it up to a lesson learned, I suppose.

 

Little pearls that will work in any situation.

This is a very small world (hospitality) and inherent in our makeup is our love to talk.

Suppose it comes as a nice change to chew the fat over drinks after work as we have spent the last 6-8 hours grunting and spewing rude crap (can he move any SLOWER?) at the rest of the team.

If you just cannot stand another minute call in.

It has been hard enuf for the ladies to get a foothold in the BOH.... don't give them any ammunition.

 

mimi

post #42 of 44

I am a bit older thank you :) so I will give you some advice. Years ago I used to give a lot of time to restaurants, time away from my family and all for free. Over time I have realized that you should be very cautious and not do that. Your time is very valuable and in the same notion that a restaurant or business would never give you free money don't give your time away for free. There is a difference between just doing your 40 and showing up early helping the chef with special events once in a while. However if you are regularly giving 10-15 hours or more a week away to a restaurant my advice is don't. Your time with your family and doing things you enjoy outside of work is valuable. I think you learned a good life lesson just like the rest of us did at some point.

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #43 of 44

Anyway, no advice on the other part, but I love kugel.

post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 

 

That's the worst thing you can ever say as a cook/chef. 

 

Good luck to you in the future, sounds like you'll need it. 

Not sure she said that directly to the chef. It's her state of mind after giving 200%. It seems to me that she cares quite a bit. 

 

You don't know what her situation is, in its entirety. What her options are, what her liabilities are. etc. etc. You haven't walked a mile. . . 

 

Saying she is going to need luck because she, in your judgment, is doing everything wrong is not helpful and misplaced. Misguided as well. 

 

The only advice I would give her is to work until her contract is up, and bolt. If she is not going to get any blowback from stepping out on her contract because of ill feelings, so be it. Call it return Karma for the owners and head chefs that abused her. As long as you have references and can justify the time you were with this particular restaurant without bashing them, no need to furnish a contact number. The person you worked for left and you don't know where they went, etc, etc. Blah blah blah. Keep your head down and do the work. You will succeed. Its the restaurant industry, not corporate american executive search. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › What to do with an extra large amount of pre scrambled eggs (dinner service)