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Might be "old school" but still good

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
From a service point of view, things I was taught many, many years ago, but still think make for good hospitality.

Welcoming guests and pulling the chair out for them
Lapping napkins
Also, rolling napkin and placing back onto the setting if a guest leaves the table.
Asking how the meal was
Turning away from guest when scraping plates
Pouring coffee or tea away from the guest
Clearing bread plates, unused cutlery and cruet sets before dessert service.
Remembering their drink

There's obviously heaps more, but my point is that I see so many floor staff without these attentions to detail nowadays.

What say you?
post #2 of 8

The points of service you've mentioned (As well as many more) should be part of the skill set of any fine dining server.

 

It all depends on the operation: dress code, table turnover times, guest check averages etc. These same procedures will kill a server in a high volume casual operation (As I have learned recently working very briefly at a sports bar sytle restaurant)

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Yes, agreed, but oftentimes even in a lower scale restaurant these little touches set you apart from the rest. And a good server can do it quickly and cleanly without much imposition on their time.

But in essence, I agree with you.
post #4 of 8

It's hard to unlearn fine dining protocol, and yes it sets you apart at any restaurant. If its efficient when slammed, that's another story.

 

Me: "Good evening mam *nod*, sir *nod*, can I start you two off with one of our signature drinks, or maybe one of our 25 beers on tap?"

 

Server still fumbling to put her phone away: "What ch'yall wunna drank?"

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewOrleansCookJ View Post
 

It's hard to unlearn fine dining protocol, and yes it sets you apart at any restaurant. If its efficient when slammed, that's another story.

 

Me: "Good evening mam *nod*, sir *nod*, can I start you two off with one of our signature drinks, or maybe one of our 25 beers on tap?"

 

Server still fumbling to put her phone away: "What ch'yall wunna drank?"

I yeah it is definitely like this. 

I used to work in hotels (barman and reception) so in the front of the house i used to have a very nice attitude, nice vocabulary no cursing near clients, an A-class Shmoozer. 

Inside the kitchen its every f-bomb and swear you won´t believe, swearing like a sailor. 

 

Anyway i don´t work FOH anymore, but in some occasions i still do a gig or two for people i know. Ill admit nowadays these newbies who never worked a day in there life FOH and can barely carry two plates to a table are a piece of work. 

Ofcourse some restaurants are not meant for black tie, but in general having manners and just simply treating paying customers well and being nice and friendly is great. 

Lots of mistakes i sometimes notice are simple mistakes that lack comman sense. Some people just can´t think, if the plate is empty, dirty and on the table while the guests are talking then you should go pick it up and maybe offer desserts...


Edited by KaiqueKuisine - 3/13/16 at 8:38am

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
If you are a good server, the extra time is minimal. Just noticing what needs to be done, even if you can't get to it right away is a good sign.
post #7 of 8

It's all about training. Training, training, oh...did I say training?

Yes to everything that Cronker mentioned plus more.

 

In a fast casual atmosphere, I doubt there is a need for the napkin to be refolded and placed when the diner leaves to use the bathroom, but most definitely yes to the rest.

 

Serve from the left

Pick-up from the right

Desserts and beverages on the right. 

 

Servers these days learn their jobs by following another server around while they work and observe. After a few shifts the newbie is allowed to take a table or two on their own.

 

I believe the server should have an actual class to take where they are taught the art of proper service, and the different types, (American, Russian, French, etc...) They would be paid during the educational part, and would not be allowed on the floor unless they passed a competency test.

 

Seems as though the Chilis, TGIFriday's, the Outbacks, corporate has plenty of money to spend on advertising, and decorating their places, and even doing the R and D on the food but always fall short on the FOH training part of it.

post #8 of 8

Yes...yes....yes.

Where has all the service gone?

If a wild child from small town Texas can learn ANYONE can (and there is always time for polite service...even a biker bar that only offers long neck beer and pork skins) you just have to abbreviate as needed.

 

I still have my first crumbler and wine opener (a dainty sterling silver job engraved with my nickname lol) my mentor gave me when I "graduated".

 

mimi

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