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How do you cook brussel sprouts?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

How do you cook brussel sprouts? 

 

I was thinking of keeping it simple: sautee in olive oil + butter for about 10mn, maybe add a little water to braise, finely sliced garlic cloves added 2mn before it's ready, maybe a little lemon juice at the end. 

 

Served with bratwursts. 

 

Any better idea? 

post #2 of 29
Cut them in half and roast them hard on a cast iron skillet

Or deep fry
post #3 of 29

Simple is the way to go imo.  My favorite way is to cut them in half and roast them in olive oil with a little salt.

 

I have also boiled them until tender and sauté them with onion and garlic or onion and bacon.

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post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 

I don't have a cast iron skillet so it'll have to go in the stainless steel sautée pan. But yes I was thinking of cutting them in half and sauteeing the cut-face down first to get a nice color. 

post #5 of 29

When I was a kid my mom just boiled them in a pot of water, which is why I didn't care for brussel sprouts for the longest time. 

 

Now I have found delicious ways to use them that even my kids ask for seconds.

 

For a no fuss method I would just cut them into quarter, put them in a bag with oil, salt and pepper. Then just roast them in the oven at 425 until they get that nice blackened color (no they are not burnt, they are very tasty this way). I have also done this on the grill and with same great results.

 

I've also sauteed them with bacon, garlic, salt, pepper, and butter and they are delicious this way as well.

 

My new favorite way is sauteing the brussel sprouts in some oil until they are starting to get that blackened color, add in sliced up banana peppers, and peppadews, cook for a bit, take it off the heat, add some buffalo sauce and some crumbled blue cheese. give a couple tosses and serve....Awesome tasting! 

 

And for the excess leaves that fall off. Deep fry them until crispy, drain on a paper towel, and salt. I love this snack, tastes like popcorn and just as addicting.

 

Hope this helps

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post #6 of 29

I clean, X the bottoms, blanch then saute in bacon drippin's and serve with the bacon, salt, pepper and a splash of good vinegar.

post #7 of 29

I never liked them until I read Alfred Portales' Gotham cookbook. He suggests separating the leaves and blanching them for a minute or two. That's it. 

 A bit of effort I know but they really are very enjoyable done that way. 

post #8 of 29
I typically cut in half lengthwise, steam them until they're barely fork tender,
then marinade in garlic and lemon juice mixture, place in frige a few hours or
overnight.
At that point you can either eat them as is or drop into a saute' pan or oven
for further culinary experimentation.
post #9 of 29
My everyday go-tos are steamed w butter and lemon juice, or roasted (tossed in oil) w garlic and lemon juice. For dressier occasions - chopped bs cooked in cream (a La Julia), or roasted w halved fingerlings/herbs/garlic, or drizzled w dijon vinaigrette, shredded bs pancakes, or adding roasted chestnuts. Roasted or steamed w butter, lemon juice & sprinkled w Parmesan. Many ways to go w Brussels sprouts.
post #10 of 29

Au gratin with bechamel.

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post #11 of 29
I like to caramelize in bacon fat with onion, add raisins, apples, pine nuts, s&p
post #12 of 29
I like them simply roasted with olive oil, salt, pepper and thyme.

When I'm being fancy I also add balsamic or pomegranate molasses before I roast them.

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post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

I don't have a cast iron skillet so it'll have to go in the stainless steel sautée pan. But yes I was thinking of cutting them in half and sauteeing the cut-face down first to get a nice color. 

How do you make cornbread?

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post

How do you make cornbread?
Did you know that cornbread can be made in other vessels?

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post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurenlulu View Post

I like to caramelize in bacon fat with onion, add raisins, apples, pine nuts, s&p

 

THIS looks awesome lulu!

Have all of these in my pantry just need the sprouts.

 

mimi

 

Might add a handful of dried cranberries for the acid hit?

 

m.

post #16 of 29

I've tried a lot of different ways and I still think the best is par-cooking in salted boiling water, shocking in ice water, then finishing in a blazing hot skillet after cutting them in half to brown the cut surface.

 

Finish with salt, pepper, butter, bacon, vinaigrette, whatever.

 

I can't stand how you get them in so many restaurants now in their blackened but raw forms.  I hope it goes away.

post #17 of 29
Quote:

I can't stand how you get them in so many restaurants now in their blackened but raw forms.  I hope it goes away.

 

Me too!  A good browning is not burning and a cook should know the difference

post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpooley View Post


I can't stand how you get them in so many restaurants now in their blackened but raw forms.  I hope it goes away.

Oh gosh I kind of love them like that. Not black but I like them to be well browned on the outside and rather hard on the inside. Al dente.

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post #19 of 29
Mimi, cranberries would make it incredible!
post #20 of 29

Not to hijack the thread, but this article recently got me thinking about other ways to prepare vegetables.  

 

http://www.saveur.com/article/Techniques/The-Soft-Approach

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post #21 of 29

@Hank  This is a great article.

 

Expanding from my burnt Brussels sprouts comment above, home cooks (and restaurants) err WAY too much on the crisp side of crisp tender.  There are lots of soft beautiful vegetable preparations that look and taste great but yet aren't mush.

post #22 of 29

Cut the ends off and split them in half. Then I simply fry them in butter (no pre-blanching) with a little salt and pepper. 

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post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post
 

Cut the ends off and split them in half. Then I simply fry them in butter (no pre-blanching) with a little salt and pepper. 

That's pretty much what I ended up doing. Sauteed in oil+butter, the added the lid to pan steam them for a few mn. Finished with a little sliced garlic, S & P. Very good. 

post #24 of 29

S&P, olive oil and balsamic roasted.

Finished with bacon and butter.

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post #25 of 29

Cut out the core, add a tiny bit of chopped garlic and then stuff the rest with fine chopped bacon(or fine ground) then arrange core up on a foil pan and into the smoker to cook through.

post #26 of 29

My favorite way is to peel the leaves down to the core, then slice up the core.  I quickly sauté the separated leaves and sliced cores then deglaze with Maderia or Sherry and toss with crispy bacon, toasted pecans and dried cranberries.  Peeling all those sprouts is time consuming though, so if I don't have the time I usually cut them in half, sauté them, cut side down until caramelized, add a bit more butter an just a bit of water (a couple of tablespoons at a time), cover and cook just until barely tender-I still want a bit of a crunch with them.

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
 

My favorite way is to peel the leaves down to the core, then slice up the core.  I quickly sauté the separated leaves and sliced cores then deglaze with Maderia or Sherry and toss with crispy bacon, toasted pecans and dried cranberries. 


That sounds delicious. I had peeled brussel sprouts in a restaurant before and I loved them because they were only slightly cooked and remained crunchy. Just briefly sauteed with garlic or something. Your version sounds great too.

post #28 of 29

Sometimes I like coming here for recipe ideas. All of these are awesome. I'll come back next year. 

 

I half them and use copious amounts of bacon or cream. Sometimes with dried fruit.  Either together or separately. 

 

And I hate brussel sprouts. :lol:

post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 

Yes, thanks everyone for sharing your ideas. Will use them next times I cook Brussel sprouts!

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