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Gound veal: what to do with it?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

So today it wasn't me shopping, but it is me cooking. I have ground veal, swiss chard and potatoes.

 

Not too sure what to do with the ground veal? Probably just patties, with sweated onions and garlic? I'm worried that veal may not have much taste... I rarely work with ground veal unless I mix it with ground pork and or beef.

post #2 of 11

Brown the meat, then add chopped onion and garlic, one finely diced tomato, some herbs and a little white wine.  When that cooks down a bit add a cup of rice.  Cut the potatoes into half inch slices and season them before laying them on the bottom of a dutch oven with olive oil.  Roll the rice mixture into the swiss chard like a dolma and lay those on top of the potatoes.  Add chicken stock or water and let it simmer on the stove or in the oven.  Remove the dolmas and potatoes gently and arrange on a platter.  With the remaining liquid (or add a little more chicken stock) in the pot make an avgolemono sauce and drizzle over the dolmas.

 

Avgolemono sauce - beat one egg and the juice of one lemon in a heat proof bowl.  Slowly temper the egg by adding the hot liquid to it one ladle at a time.  Check for seasoning, strain and serve.  

 

This dish is way better with pork by the way but veal works too.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

That sounds delicious! What a great idea. Thanks Kouk'!

post #4 of 11
Meatballs. Combine veal with ricotta, egg, crumbs, grated Parm, and herbs of choice. Cook them in homemade tomato sauce. Serve over polenta or pasta with crusty bread, salad and wine.
post #5 of 11
Swedish meatballs with cream sauce, boiled potato, and sautéed chard.
post #6 of 11
I don't really like working with ground veal, but if I had it to work with, I'd want to focus on the veal and maybe go with some form of stuffed pasta, and it doesn't matter what kind. For this post we'll go with tortellini.

Rely on browning the meat to obtain most of the flavor, seasoning very modestly with garlic, salt and a little pepper. You don't want to overpower that subtle flavor with too much seasoning, but you could add a little mince onion and some choice subtle herbs, but be very conservative. Add finely chopped chard (gently sauteed) and ricotta to the tortellini, then cover with the seasoned veal.

You can get a bit bolder with the sauce if you want, and employ a tomato based sauce, but I personally would go with a cream based sauce, using just enough in either case to just coat the pasta. Any leftover chard can sauteed with mushrooms and be added to complete the finished dish.

I would save the potatoes for another day.
post #7 of 11

Try this recipe. The flavorful sauces help with the blandish veal. This picture is actually manicotte but they look similar so I borrowed this pic from internet. (http://www.canned-fresh.com/live/media/2012/07/manicotti-with-sauce.jpg)

 

http://www.canned-fresh.com/live/media/2012/07/manicotti-with-sauce.jpg

 

Cannelloni Alla Romano

 

Unquestionably one of my very favorite Roman dishes. And although it may be prepared as a large casserole dish, it is much more elegant when prepared as individual servings each in its own oval chafing dish. This is the way cannelloni would be prepared in Rome.  Once assembled, the dishes may be covered with tinfoil and frozen in advanced preparation of a large dinner party.  In that case, the individual chafing dishes are unwrapped of their tinfoil when needed, and go straight into the oven.

 

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Pasta will be baked on the top shelf. The bottom shelf of the oven should be provisioned with a sheet of tin foil to catch and spillage.

 

Roman Style Tomato Sauce

Italian White Sauce

Fettuccine al uova recipe making egg pasta in 5 inch squares

 

Filling:

1-2 tablespoons of olive oil

1 finely diced small red onion

1 pound ground veal

1 pound ricotta cheese

1 pound fresh spinach (or swiss chard) triple washed and stemmed

1/2 cup heavy cream

1 beaten egg

¼ cup bread crumbs made from stale Italian Bread (stabilizer)

1/4 cup graded Asiago cheese

1/4 cup graded Romano cheese

1/4 cup graded Parmesan cheese

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Sea salt and white pepper

 

Cook the stemed greens in boiling salted water for five minutes, drain, put the greens in a kitchen towel and wring the towel to force out water  then chopped well. Saute the onion in olive oil until translucent.  Add the veal and cook over low heat, stirring and breaking up the bits with a wooden spoon until the meat just done.  Do not overcook!  Allow mixture to cool. In a large bowl, beat the egg until pale yellow. Add and mix all the other ingredients and season with nutmeg and sea salt and pepper. Refrigerate the mixture for several hours to make it manageable.

 

Very lightly brush the individual oval chaffing dish bottoms (boats) with olive oil. Spoon in two table spoons of red sauce in bottom of dish.

 

Assemble Cannelloni two channels per dish being careful not to over fill the individual boats.

 

Add filling to each wrapper and a little white sauce to the pasta sheet. Roll up so some white sauce is rolled between the pasta sheet walls. Cover the two channels with white Sauce. Then cover the white sauce with Roman Style Tomato Sauce. Top with grated Romano cheese. Drizzle over the channels a hint of good olive oil.  

 

Bake at 350 F for about 45-60 minutes or until done. Dishes should be bubbling hot and placed on a larger round plate so they may be carried. Serve immediately.

 

A full bodied Italian wine is suggested. (Brunello, Bordolino, Brolio, Sangiovese)

 

Garnish with the tip leaves of an Italian basil.

 

Do buy the authentic Italiam cheeses to see what a perfection they yield.

post #8 of 11
Bolognese sauce is another idea. Used to see cannelloni stuffed w veal in white/bechamel sauce on Italian menus years ago. Don't see it any more. Can't seem to find veal at the local market in So Cal. Miss scallopine/sàltimboca, Milanese or Parm w French Fries or spaghetti and so on. Wonder if it fell out of style/popularity with Tartufo and Spumoni, or it's considered "politically incorrect meat." Need to find an old school Italian restaurant, I guess.
Edited by Cerise - 3/18/16 at 5:51pm
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys for all the great ideas. Very inspiring. As many times lately, I ended up not having much time, finishing work 45mn before my family came home, so with 45 mn to cook it all, I decided to keep it simple and made little veal cakes (mixed ground veal with a little flour, breadcrumbs, and egg, and some milk, sweated onions and garlic) and home fried potatoes. And my wife is now making a gratin with the Swiss chards for lunch.

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Thanks guys for all the great ideas. Very inspiring. As many times lately, I ended up not having much time, finishing work 45mn before my family came home, so with 45 mn to cook it all, I decided to keep it simple and made little veal cakes (mixed ground veal with a little flour, breadcrumbs, and egg, and some milk, sweated onions and garlic) and home fried potatoes. And my wife is now making a gratin with the Swiss chards for lunch.

 

I often have grand ideas about what I'm going to prepare for dinner and then I end up eating fried eggs instead. Happens all the time, good for you for attempting something semi-involved haha, at least it wasn't eggs.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

I often have grand ideas about what I'm going to prepare for dinner and then I end up eating fried eggs instead. Happens all the time, good for you for attempting something semi-involved haha, at least it wasn't eggs.


Yeah after all is said and done, more is said than done!

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