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smoking food indoors

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

any tips on smoking food indoors (like in an apartment?)

post #2 of 14

What do you want to smoke?

Hot smoking or smoke-cooking should be possible on the stove top.

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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post #3 of 14
Depending on what you want to smoke, of course... Two options are a Cameron Smoker or a smoking gun. Have lots of ventilation.
post #4 of 14

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #5 of 14

If you're cold smoking, all you need is

1) wood chips

2) blowtorch

3) sheet pan

4) inverted fish bowl, mixing bowl, wine glass, etc  to go on top

post #6 of 14

I once got free rent on an apartment....all I had to do is take emergency calls from 11 pm until 6 am.

Mostly from the drunks who lost their keys but a fair amount of kitchen problems as well.

If you think it may be a problem take the battery out of the smoke detector until you are finished.

Unless you really like to do the not so fun jumping and batting dance of the kitchen towel lol.

 

mimi

post #7 of 14
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 14

I am not a fan of the technique shown in that video.  You are trapping all the smoke in, which is not what you want to do.  You want the smoke to just kiss the meat as it passes by, on its way out.  Any longer and your meat can start to pick up bitter and off flavors as more and more of the creosote and impurities are deposited on it.  It might not much in a shorter smoke, although I always want fresh smoke, but in longer smokes keeping that smoked trapped in with the meat can spell disaster.

post #9 of 14

Well Pete, it's just an emergency indoor smoking. 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #10 of 14
I guess this is baa baa but how about liquid smoke
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post

I guess this is baa baa but how about liquid smoke


I was thinking of reporting this forum post to the moderators, but decided to quote it instead.

 

Ya... what about liquid smoke?

 

I have a friend, yes... a friend, who uses liquid smoke when making pulled pork or brisket in the oven. He says, this friend I mean, that a little gives a hint of smoke but more does not give the taste of real smoking. This friend, so he/she says, finds liquid smoke to be quite useful in some circumstances and even seeks out the different varieties of that product that exist.

post #12 of 14

liquid smoke has it's uses. I prefer smoke powder. But to replicate barbecue, no, liquid smoke is just a chorus of lament. 

 

The smoking techniques in this thread are about small cuts of meat smoked quickly. If they need longer cooking, it's finished in the oven or such.  This is not to replicate barbecue either. Just to impart some smoke flavor and color. It's an honored technique in Chinese cuisine but they do it more with tea and raw rice which is a different flavor. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

wow what awesome advice.  thanks a bunch.  will keep you posted.

post #14 of 14

Phatch, I agree with your comments about liquid smoke. Even though I own 3 grills and 2 smokers, I do find occasional uses for liquid smoke, just not for trying to duplicate the flavor of barbecue.

 

As for my comments on the technique shown above; I should clarify.  I am not against the technique as a whole.  I have often done stove top smoking and wok smoking.  What I take issue with is covering the whole thing in foil  and not allowing the smoke to escape.  What I do is cover the top in foil but then poke a few holes in it to allow the smoke to vent.  This keeps a good flow of fresh smoke going and you don't have to worry about off flavors because of stale smoking coming in contact with the food for too long.  Yes, doing it this way does create some smoke in your house, so unplug your smoke detectors, but the amount of smoke you are actually creating can mostly be vented by opening up a couple of windows.

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