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Has anyone ever thought about walking away from this industry?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Just looking for some free form thinking...


My husband, who is also a chef, and I frequently entertain this idea of selling everything we own, buying an RV, living in it full-time and following the seasons here in the states working at ranches, lodges, ski resorts, etc.  Essentially working as guns for hire.

Anyone else think like that?

post #2 of 21

I think if it's really thought out it could work. A person can work in high tourist areas for seasonal work. Places like Yellowstone hire people to work during the summer season. Ski lodges hire in the winter. Golf and beach resorts hire during the summer months. If you plan right you could be asked back and plan your schedule. I'm not sure I would know of any other way of accomplishing this unless your traveling in a seasonal area that needs a larger staff for a shot period of time. I think it's a good idea for people who want a bit more out of life than feeling like their working and not really enjoying life..........The best

post #3 of 21

I mention this frequently to a friend of mine. Haven't worked out the details yet but it's a constant consideration. Somehow to include a money making website and web cam if at all possible. Planning to look at RV's in the next month or so just to humor myself. Enjoy being on the road more than anything. Travel and cooking together would be fantastic. 

post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 

That's exactly what we are thinking, Chefwriter.  Traveling and cooking together.

post #5 of 21
Being a from the beginning avid D&D player I often thought about chucking it all in and going culinary adventuring in my younger years, but then kids.

Live the dream 😀
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherman452 View Post
 

Just looking for some free form thinking...


My husband, who is also a chef, and I frequently entertain this idea of selling everything we own, buying an RV, living in it full-time and following the seasons here in the states working at ranches, lodges, ski resorts, etc.  Essentially working as guns for hire.

Anyone else think like that?

If you think your wages are low now try the nomadic life.  My wife and I have spent sixteen years on the road in an RV.  We have met people who love the lifestyle and many who sold everything and hate it.  It is very expensive to "following the seasons."  You will be at locations at peak season and the most expensive.  RV sites at places like Yellowstone may be 6-8 hundred a month.  You will be a seasonal employee and probably in a entry level position.  As far a ski resorts go RV's are cold in the winter.  When fuel is at five dollars a gallon it costs a lot to move.  We have worked for money a several different jobs.  Volunteer positions are more our style.  Talk about young supervisors, we worked for a 21 year old in ND who was a monster.  Good luck at a money making website that is a full time job.

 

Now that that is over I can say it has been a glorious trip.  We have traveled all 49 continental US states most several times.  We have also traveled much of Canada and Mexico. We have loved and I would encourage any one to think about trying it.  We are leaving tomorrow to meet some friends in FL.

 

Happy Trails

 

JiMyra 

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

If you think your wages are low now try the nomadic life.  My wife and I have spent sixteen years on the road in an RV.  We have met people who love the lifestyle and many who sold everything and hate it.  It is very expensive to "following the seasons."  You will be at locations at peak season and the most expensive.  RV sites at places like Yellowstone may be 6-8 hundred a month.  You will be a seasonal employee and probably in a entry level position.  As far a ski resorts go RV's are cold in the winter.  When fuel is at five dollars a gallon it costs a lot to move.  We have worked for money a several different jobs.  Volunteer positions are more our style.  Talk about young supervisors, we worked for a 21 year old in ND who was a monster.  Good luck at a money making website that is a full time job.

 

Now that that is over I can say it has been a glorious trip.  We have traveled all 49 continental US states most several times.  We have also traveled much of Canada and Mexico. We have loved and I would encourage any one to think about trying it.  We are leaving tomorrow to meet some friends in FL.

 

Happy Trails

 

JiMyra 


JiMyra, good example of RV life. I live in the Pacific Northwest and bought a Thousand trails 2 region membership. Most of the parks in Wash and Oregon aren't that big of a deal but they give me what I need for part time living on the Washington, Oregon coast. My membership lets me stay 2 weeks at a time then have to be out for a week. During that 2 weeks in, it only cost me $3 a day with sewer and electric hookups. All that being said this method fits my situation because I can also store my RV in these parks for the week or weeks until I come back to the coast. I have talked with other RVers that have a few memberships that allow them 3 weeks in parks and then moving to another park. There are also yearly leases that you can come and go or leave your RV in place to use for up to 210 days a year. In a place like Longbeach Oregon it would cost someone $2400 a year for the space including sewer and electric. This is $200 a month with no other cost except propane for cooking and heat. I think there are many options out there and with a lot of research a person can live on very little. There are places in Arizona called the slabs that people park at no cost. It all depends on what your needs are and if you need to be close to larger cities for work. I'm sure you could write a book on your experiences. We all grow up living and working in the same community. Living in a RV is an adventure but in no means would it be for everyone. Most Americans can't see living in anything less that a 3000 sqft home with three bathrooms. The best thing I like about Rving is, when you pull into a park it's like a club. Every rig houses someone with a friendly wave and hello. RVers are easy to talk with or invite over for a drink and conversation. It's like we are all in the same foxhole together no one is any better than anyone else. I think you get a much more feeling of community in these places than you will ever feel in your own hometown. This kind of life takes a lot of patiences and understanding. I think you just made me think twice about setting up a trailer in a winter wonderland about 21/2 hrs from my home. I could now see how winter Rving would be troublesome......

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherman452 View Post
 

Just looking for some free form thinking...


My husband, who is also a chef, and I frequently entertain this idea of selling everything we own, buying an RV, living in it full-time and following the seasons here in the states working at ranches, lodges, ski resorts, etc.  Essentially working as guns for hire.

Anyone else think like that?


I'd love to do that...lol....Before I started consulting, I wanted to walk away daily from it. It's a bit different now. I work in the seasonal summer gig and consult in the offseason where make more money in the 4 month offseason than I do in the 8 month seasonal gig. Let's just say...I play power ball religiously....cuz ya can't win unless you play baby!!!!

post #9 of 21
Just one more regulation to insert into the boot on America's collective neck.
http://freedomoutpost.com/hud-wants-to-make-living-in-a-tiny-house-or-rv-illegal/
Only 8 more months but it is crap like this that makes me wonder if we can stay afloat that long.

mimi
post #10 of 21


become "Vice Dependent!!"   LOL

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Just one more regulation to insert into the boot on America's collective neck.
http://freedomoutpost.com/hud-wants-to-make-living-in-a-tiny-house-or-rv-illegal/
Only 8 more months but it is crap like this that makes me wonder if we can stay afloat that long.

mimi


8 more months of this? Where have you been for the last 30 years?  Reagan started us down the path to naked corporatism and it's been getting steadily worse.  Bow down to your corporate overlords!  They're making a good attempt to buy the last few politicians they don't already own.  It will only get worse I fear.  Bernie would be our best hope but the multinationals will probably have him killed if it looks like he was a real shot.  You have to keep the consumers consuming after all- the yachts don't buy themselves.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #12 of 21

I find most people don't think outside the box very often. It takes a lot of nerve to leave the real world for a world you make up one day at a time. We grew up being told what to do and how to do it. Most people don't know how to take the path less traveled. I did this in the late 70's, I bought a one way ticket to Hawaii a place I knew no one. I wanted to go to a place that I knew no one and had no one to fall back on. It was up to me to either succeed or fail. I changed careers and stared at a low level position in a multiplex restaurant complex. I told the GM I would be managing the operation in 6 months. He laughed and hired me to watch me fail. In 8 months I was managing a new restaurant that was opening at a local museum. When you go out of your comfort zone you tend to think about everything you do everyday. You set your life up as it's a business with real goals. I would tell everyone with drive to better themselves to venture out and try to succeed in their dreams. You only have one shot at living make sure you give it your best shot........I would rather live one day of my dream then a year of someone else's.........The best......Bill

post #13 of 21

Very inspirational ChefBilly B, I think you are right...I too left to live in Spain without knowing the language or anyone there and not only survived but had great time..I will be 50 this year, and only in November 2015 I took a pub kitchen here in London to run as my own business.  I always wanted my own place but could never afford it....what I do now is next best thing. I am doing around 70 hours per week, I wash up, essentially I am a one man band. But HAPPY one man band, as I am working for myself making my own decisions, menus, don't need to explain why I don;t want prawn cocktail on my menu or ....I made twice as much money in my last job but I was miserable, now everybody tells me I look better, laugh much more  and in general have positive outlook on life, So whatever will make you happy is worth doing in my book, life is short and you only get one stab at it....

post #14 of 21

@Sherman452 Go for it!! You will never live with regrets if you choose to do this, in my humble opinion. We have started building our own tiny house on wheels to do the same thing so to speak. It will look like this when done 


It will cost roughly $45000.00 CDN to finish and put all the things I want into it. I have more expensive tastes....lol. WE are building it ourselves and having a riot (and SOME disagreements) doing it however, there are mostly laughs as we figure things out and have our knowledgeable friends come along and help us older folk out (we are not old YET). I have a few friends that have already done the same, living full time in them and travelling all over. The homes are like a home in regards to insulation so changing climates are not much of an issue with them. They have a wee fireplace, A/C (which costs pennies to run and one of my friends even has a full kitchen in their place. RV sites, mobile home parks and people with large properties or land have all given permission for these little homes to stay there. The most they have paid thus far has been $400/month on a city property. They have NEVER run into problems with places to park them and stay as they said most people seem to like the aesthetics compared to RV's however that is an individual opinion not mine.

 

Anyhow, getting out and about to live one's life is a wonderful idea and I hope you pursue it!! Wishing you all the best!! :bounce:

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fablesable View Post
 

@Sherman452 Go for it!! You will never live with regrets if you choose to do this, in my humble opinion. We have started building our own tiny house on wheels to do the same thing so to speak. It will look like this when done 


It will cost roughly $45000.00 CDN to finish and put all the things I want into it. I have more expensive tastes....lol. WE are building it ourselves and having a riot (and SOME disagreements) doing it however, there are mostly laughs as we figure things out and have our knowledgeable friends come along and help us older folk out (we are not old YET). I have a few friends that have already done the same, living full time in them and travelling all over. The homes are like a home in regards to insulation so changing climates are not much of an issue with them. They have a wee fireplace, A/C (which costs pennies to run and one of my friends even has a full kitchen in their place. RV sites, mobile home parks and people with large properties or land have all given permission for these little homes to stay there. The most they have paid thus far has been $400/month on a city property. They have NEVER run into problems with places to park them and stay as they said most people seem to like the aesthetics compared to RV's however that is an individual opinion not mine.

 

Anyhow, getting out and about to live one's life is a wonderful idea and I hope you pursue it!! Wishing you all the best!! :bounce:


I like the tiny home deal but I need something a bit larger. My plan is a live in trailer that I can park on the coast and travel to it as I want. Whats nice about this is I can park it in 1000 trails for 2 weeks at a time then one week out. I can also rent a space for a year with full hookups come and go as I like. This way theres no taxes involved and in most all cases under 4K a year.

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie007 View Post
 

Very inspirational ChefBilly B, I think you are right...I too left to live in Spain without knowing the language or anyone there and not only survived but had great time..I will be 50 this year, and only in November 2015 I took a pub kitchen here in London to run as my own business.  I always wanted my own place but could never afford it....what I do now is next best thing. I am doing around 70 hours per week, I wash up, essentially I am a one man band. But HAPPY one man band, as I am working for myself making my own decisions, menus, don't need to explain why I don;t want prawn cocktail on my menu or ....I made twice as much money in my last job but I was miserable, now everybody tells me I look better, laugh much more  and in general have positive outlook on life, So whatever will make you happy is worth doing in my book, life is short and you only get one stab at it....


frankie, I wish you the best in your Pub. It took me a while to learn this but all I really ever wanted was to be who I am and practice the trade that I am good at and love. The reason why we love this business so much is because we get quick gratification from what we do. It gives us a sense of accomplishment that makes all the hours we work worth wild........ The best.......Chef Bill

post #17 of 21

I think the tiny house movement is badass but I'm not sure I could live without my home theater, reloading room, shop to do sharpening and storage for all my toys.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #18 of 21
As a chef that has worked a lot of of restaurants, both good and bad, it's hard to just walk into a restaurant and demand high pay.
post #19 of 21


LOL...Reloading room..lol.....

post #20 of 21

If you can plan ahead there are always tons of RV parks and campgrounds offering free space for a bit of work in return (this is what we are planning).

Hard on your own if you need an outside job but with a partner to share the load anything is possible.

 

mimi

post #21 of 21

There are many RV parks and Campgrounds that do trade out space for work.  At many of these you will be working for minimum wage or less.  Most paid hours are about eight bucks an hour.  I know one couple who made OK money cleaning rental condos at peak season.  They both worked over forty hours a week.  I am not trying to be negative but Workamping is not big money.  I believe you need an income other than what you can make at temporary jobs.  Being on the road is a wonderful lifestyle for some of us.  ENJOY LIFE!

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