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Consideration for diabetic customers which are 50% of the population

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

A quote from Forbes is:

 

"According to a study published online in JAMA today, nearly 50% of adults living in the U.S. have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition where a person already has elevated blood sugar and is at risk to develop diabetes."

 

That means HALF of your adult customers need sugar-free foods.

 

Does your restaurant serve sugar-free desserts

post #2 of 12
I'm diabetic and have no problem eating out.
I steer clear of desserts and watch the carbs.

Once or twice a month I will make something sugar free at home for my sweet tooth.
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnniesKitchen View Post
 

A quote from Forbes is:

 

"According to a study published online in JAMA today, nearly 50% of adults living in the U.S. have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition where a person already has elevated blood sugar and is at risk to develop diabetes."

 

That means HALF of your adult customers need sugar-free foods.

 

Does your restaurant serve sugar-free desserts

 

I think stating that half of your adult customers need sugar-free foods is stretching it a bit.  I am just on the edge of being diabetic and I control through diet and metformin-no insulin shots.  I am, in no way, sugar-free.  I try to limit my sugar intake but I still splurge on soda and desserts, and even candy.  I just watch how much I eat.  And I don't really pay attention to sugar in non-dessert dishes.

 

Now, I understand that I am definitely on the lower spectrum of diabetes and there are those out there way worse off than I am, but most diabetics I know, except for the really bad off ones, just watch how much sugar they eat.  They help control their blood sugars through watching how many carbs and how much sugar they consume, but they aren't carb or sugar free.  While it might be nice to offer a sugar free dessert or 2, my guess is that most people would steer clear of those options as stating something as "sugar-free" can bring a lot of baggage with it and, to many people, implies that it will taste like crap.  Instead, if you feel that you need to offer something a little healthier and a little less sugar laden, then offer up a dessert or 2 comprised of mostly fresh fruit.  One place I worked, in summer, did a dessert of grilled stone fruits (peaches, nectarines, apricots, etc.) drizzled with lavender honey and toasted hazelnuts.  It was healthy but people didn't love it for that.  They loved it because it was a light end to a multi-course dinner and was the perfect ending for dinner in the middle of a hot Southern summer.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

I would love to start a casual restaurant which would specialize in low carb, sugarfree, gluton-free dishes. Unfortunately - or maybe fortunately - I am 65 this year and that venture is left to someone else.

 

I have eaten a low carb diet since January 1, 2012 (not diabetic, but my ex was - and my finance is) for health's sake and weight loss. I have found that there are many mundane recipes "out there", but there are also some really excellent ones. My passion is discovering the really wonderful ones.

post #5 of 12

I was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes at the tender age of 34, so I think it's a novel idea, but I am doubtful of the said statistics. I think marketing yourself as a low carb restaurant could work though, not only targeting the diabetic segment but for those watching their weight. It does bring to light some things as I myself began to have a bit of a perspective on how nearly every dish in the United States includes a starch, whether it be mashed potatoes, rice, fries etc. It's a staple, and certainly makes eating out a bit challenging, particularly when menus aren't always as transparent as you would hope. Often sugar is hidden in many items where you wouldn't expect like say a brined protein. Best of luck in your venture.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnniesKitchen View Post

A quote from Forbes is:

"According to a study published online in JAMA today, nearly 50% of adults living in the U.S. have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition where a person already has elevated blood sugar and is at risk to develop diabetes."

That means HALF of your adult customers need sugar-free foods.

Does your restaurant serve sugar-free desserts

When I read your first post, I thought it belonged in the pro category.

Upon reading further, looks like you are addressing dessert and recipes that are "out there," and based on other's medical conditions. Unclear as to the point.
post #7 of 12
You can move to NYC, we have lots of places like that. Another one just opened up in my neighborhood that serves breakfast but only turkey bacon, turkey sausage and quinoa bowls. Meh. Seems very trendy and old fashioned all at once.

I think you're thinking more of a cafe or bakery type of place that can cater to low sugar desserts. The only way that this type of establishment will do well is if the desserts are extraordinarily good enough to appeal to everyone. I make vegan chocolate chip cookies at home. Not because I am vegan or because I'm trying to be healthy. But because it's the best recipe I have found for chocolate chip cookies, hands down.

I think America has it all wrong when it comes to desserts. Eating them after dinner is not a great idea. Health wise I don't think it's a good idea to load up on sugar before bedtime. In Europe dessert is enjoyed in the afternoon, with coffee after your nap or after work. It's before dinner. In Greece meals at restaurants are always followed by a free platter of fruits. In the summer these can be quite simple or very complex. At the very least you will receive a few slices of watermelon. But most often you will also get a few chunks of melon, a peach and a couple of figs.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #8 of 12

nevermind.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I think America has it all wrong when it comes to desserts. Eating them after dinner is not a great idea.

 

I used to have a shirt which said "life is short.  Eat dessert first."  :D :D 

post #10 of 12
I used to be a big eater outer. Since I was diagnosed as "boderline type 2," it has been a challenge finding dishes on the menu I can eat, and particularly food on the run -- even though I'm surrounded by restaurants of every cuisine, and some fast food joints.

It would be great to see eateries that have creative choices for low carb.

I agree for the most part with what Pete said. However, re fruit, there are certain fruits I avoid - too high in natural sugar (or whatever the correct terminology is). A hospital nutritionist told me no honey, jam and 7 raisins a day. I bought hard candy to take with in case I get shakey, but haven,t had the need to ingest same, since I changed my diet.

I did a lot of research, saw a boatload of docs and a hospital nutritionist. After an hour of looking at plastic food (particularly a plastic baked potato), I knew I had to get more educated on my own.
Edited by Cerise - 4/5/16 at 11:19am
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

I think a big city, urban lunch restaurant specializing in low carb (sugar-free) would be very successful if every dish was high-end quality.

 

Low carb excludes a lot of natural sugars, too, as pointed out. Fruit, for example, is loaded with natural sugars. Starchy vegetables contain natural sugars. Milk contains natural sugar.

post #12 of 12

Yeah but you can have processed sugar in fiber and the combination will effectively have a low glycemic index.

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