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what would be good whetstones for my knifes

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I am new to owning knifes that are actually worth maintaining instead of just buying new ones when they are screwed so I want some good whetstones for them. only came with a steel sharpening rod and cant get them even half as sharp we were when they came. what kinda stones would be best to get? I have Japanese hammered stainless steel knives ranging from 3-8 inches long. I been looking at different whetstones but idk what would be best kind for my kinda knives. looking to try stay around the $200 mark or so.

post #2 of 6

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/knshcoset.html a pretty decent put together set at your price range. Watch the sharpening playlist on Japanese Knife Imports Youtube channel, and definitely use the magic marker/sharpie trick constantly as you are sharpening and practicing.

 

Pretty much any decent waterstone will do a fine job on your knives. As a home user, you could probably forego using the steel rod in favor of doing edge-trailing strop strokes on your finest stone for edge touch-ups.

post #3 of 6

Nothing wrong with that set, but since we're recommending learning from the JKI videos, why not throw some business that way?  In home use, a stone set like this can last longer than the chef that's using them, and since the difference in price isn't that great, I recommend calling up JKI, telling Jon what kind of knives you have and letting him recommend something.

 

Note that CKTG also has sharpening tutorials on youtube but no one ever recommends watching them since the JKI vids are so much better.  This is because Jon is way more knowledgeable in this field, and it's no coincidence that every stone he sells gets RAVE reviews from anyone that tries them.  Add in the customer service and the care Jon and Sara put into packaging and the ability/willingness to answer any questions you ever have relating to sharpening or knives in general, and the extra bucks for the stones becomes worth it even if the stones weren't vastly superior to Beston/Besters (which they are).

 

Watching Jon's vids and then shopping at CKTG is like going into a local photography shop, getting advice from experts about which camera you should buy and how to use it and then going online and buying the same gear from some online warehouse to save a few bucks.

 

I don't always buy stones, but when I do, I prefer Gesshin.

post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kartman35 View Post
 

Nothing wrong with that set, but since we're recommending learning from the JKI videos, why not throw some business that way?  In home use, a stone set like this can last longer than the chef that's using them, and since the difference in price isn't that great, I recommend calling up JKI, telling Jon what kind of knives you have and letting him recommend something.

 

Note that CKTG also has sharpening tutorials on youtube but no one ever recommends watching them since the JKI vids are so much better.  This is because Jon is way more knowledgeable in this field, and it's no coincidence that every stone he sells gets RAVE reviews from anyone that tries them.  Add in the customer service and the care Jon and Sara put into packaging and the ability/willingness to answer any questions you ever have relating to sharpening or knives in general, and the extra bucks for the stones becomes worth it even if the stones weren't vastly superior to Beston/Besters (which they are).

 

Watching Jon's vids and then shopping at CKTG is like going into a local photography shop, getting advice from experts about which camera you should buy and how to use it and then going online and buying the same gear from some online warehouse to save a few bucks.

 

I don't always buy stones, but when I do, I prefer Gesshin.


Kartman speaks the truth. I've got the set listed (I also got mine from CKTG, minus the diamond plate). Very nice stones, but Mark at CKTG didn't originate that particular combination, Dave Martell did. I've heard a lot of great word-of-mouth about the service at JKI and how good the stones are in their 3-stone set.  The Beston/Bester/Rika is a very nice (and what I've been using for years), but were I to do it again, I'd just call Jon at JKI and tell him my needs. I still rankle a little bit at Mark at CKTG sending back the Tojiro bread knife I tried to return. I got two for Christmas by mistake, same knife, and sent the unused and unopened one back to him a few weeks after the nominal return date had passed and he refused the shipment. Oh, that and his Artifex gyuto that I got was total shite. Again, the Beston/Bester/Rika set is totally fine- just pick a better vendor.

 

Foody518 is right on... once you get the stone set, you probably won't have much need for the honing steel. I've got a ceramic one (Idahone) and only use it on my cheapest knives. The better knives either get a strop on the highest-grit stone, or (more commonly) a brief trip to the balsa wood strop with 1 micron cubic boron nitride from us-products.com.

 

And- a reality check... if you have and like German stainless knives, there's really no need to go higher than about 2000 grit. A 2000 stone will get you factory-sharp and beyond, at will. Harder knives can benefit from the polish of 3000 grit or better. Probably information you already knew!

 

Hope this helps!

post #5 of 6

Well I wouldn't suffer anyone to endure German stainless, but fact is I used a Wusthof Ikon for several years as a go-to, and it worked tolerably well for very thin slicing.

 

I liked it much better finished at 10K+ than at 6K, no matter what I cut with it, so that's just another perspective.

 

Second it, buy from Jon over cktg anyday.  His 3-stone set is really all you need.  You can supplement it with a diamond loaded strop if you really want to go finer, best way to go for a really fine edge.

 

No offense to Denver VN, but CBN tends to draw a wire, with most steels anyway.  Diamond is what most use here, it's also what US Products recommends.

post #6 of 6
All will depend on the type of steel. A German soft stainless gets basically a 400, deburring perhaps with a 800 or natural sponge, or a green Scotch pad when it's a Victorinox. Any refinement is meaningless. You will abrade the matrix and carbides will break out. An unstable edge.
Soft carbons and finely grained stainless can benefit from polishing up to 8k.
For some modern stainless you won't look for a full polishing, but still need high grit stones for abrading the burr. Example: VG-10, coarser stainless, PM's.
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