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Salty Macarons (especially Leek Macaron)?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hey,

 

I've tasted a while back, a Leek Macaron, this was served on a side of Liver Pate

 

The idea was good, but the Macaron itself was too sweet (maybe just a bit less sweeter than a regular dessert filling macaron)

 

 

I would like to try to make one, but get it better, maybe use other idea for salty (non-sweet) filling 

 

any idea how can i make the macaron shells themselves less sweet? I guess i would sweet need enough sugar powder for the whipping and "Lava" consistency, not sure if adding a good amount of salt will do the job, have a bad taste or screw up the baking process (which macarons tend to be "spoiled" enough even without it) 

 

any ideas? 

 

Thanks in advance! 

Shani 

post #2 of 7

Only having made sweet macaroons I decided to google savory macarons.  Here's what I found.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks Kokopuffs, browsing through the search's recipes, still see the same basics, same amount of powdered sugar, that would still be too sweet for my liking of a savory/salty macaron...was trying to look if the sugar can be substituted somehow, i guess not :( 

post #4 of 7

I've done some fun savory style macarons, but never one that wasn't sweet-ish. 


The problem is, and I'll be the first to admit I'm not a pastry chef, I believe that the meringue needs the sugar (sugar syrup) in the proper amounts in order to cook the meringue and give the the right texture/gloss etc. So you need the right, or at least right-ish, proportions of sugar to whites in order to make the texture and shine on the cookie come out. 

 

One thing I haven't experimented with is using isomalt (sugar alcohol) or glucose. Glucose is a little less sweet than table sugar. I believe it is fairly expensive though, so there is that drawback. But it might be a place to start. 

 

I did some savory-ish cocoa macarons with chicken liver mousse and I've also done something similar with foie gras. I found that the liver didn't mind a little sweetness from the cookie, and that the bitter cocoa powder helped balance out the flavor a bit. 

 

I'm sure that they could be made to pair well with different cheese and cheese mousses (say, beet macaron and feta or goat chz mousse). 

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post .................One thing I haven't experimented with is using isomalt (sugar alcohol) or glucose. Glucose is a little less sweet than table sugar. I believe it is fairly expensive though, so there is that drawback. But it might be a place to start.

 

For cheaper prices on glucose you might checkout a vendor who sells beer and wine making supplies.  I always used it for a secondary fermentation (in the bottle) for making sparkling cider.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 7
Have you tried making vegan macarons with aquafaba? They are a bit less sweet but still have a bit of sweetness to them. The aquafaba makes an earthier flavor in the shell that may work with a savory filling.
post #7 of 7

I would do a crouquette instead of a macaron. A macaron shell will always be sweet. I've been making them, the sweet version of them for over 3 years on a weekly basis, and you need the sugar syrup and TPT ratio in order for it to result in the macaron. You could try playing with the recipe, but you'll end up more towards a whoopie pie or some sort of hallow shelled cracker. A crouquette is always the best route for doing something sweet or savory because the dough is so versatile.

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