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sauté with Olives

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
So Ive recently discovered something. While sautéing, in addition to galic and onion, I added some chopped green olive. I thought it brought out the flavors and added a nice flare to the oils. I did it with a stew only once. with only adding a little salt to the meat an no outher spice I thought it had pleanty of flavor.

I was searching if this is a common thing, but all I see online is olive oil.

Does anyone have anythoughts on this? is it common? How about some good recipes that could make use of this?

Thanks!
post #2 of 16

It seems I might have seen Daisy Martinez do this a time or two?

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 16

Its how I start my puttanesca sauce, if that helps. Start with olive oil, warm to light smoke, then add shallot, capers, chopped olives--I like a mix of black and green--garlic, chili or chili flakes, and some picked oregano. Toast for a little bit, (careful not to burn chili flakes or garlic)  till very fragrant, then hit it with white wine and reduce a bit and cook off alcohol. 

 

Add tomatoes, cook, then finish the sauce with a little bagna cauda emulsified in, and some more oregano. 

 

So. Freaking. Good. 

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Im going to have to try that. What do you pair the sauce with? Also what Type of white wine?
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Oh okay, I didnt know it was a noodle sauce.
post #6 of 16
Alcaparrado is what I was thinkng of Daisy Martinez using. It's olives, capers, vinegar and such. She often referred to it as olive salad and used a commercially prepared blend, as linked below.

http://m.goya.com/product/Product.aspx?id=170

Usually used in dishes along with Recaito.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 16

From the archives:

 

 

Olive Descriptions
By ckoetke Posted 1335 views 1 comment
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Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #8 of 16

Just to give you some Alcaparrado starting points, all Daisy Martinez recipes:

 

Yellow Rice--a piilaf technique sauteing the alcaparrado at the start. 

http://www.chefdaisymartinez.com/post/49203190253/basic-yellow-rice

 

Red Beans and Rice  sort of divergent with the alcaparrado but interesting. 

http://www.cookstr.com/recipes/rice-and-red-beans

 

Ropa Vieja  a Puerto Rican Beef Stew. I often use ropa vieja as a jumping off point to taco filling. Would be interesting to try this variant

http://thedigitallatina.com/2011/10/ropa-vieja-a-daisy-martinez-recipe.html

 

Arroz con Pollo

https://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=2494209

 

Stuffed Peppers

http://www.ciaoitalia.com/seasons/17/1718/daisy-martinez-s-stuffed-poblano-peppers  This is weird. Why is Daisy's recipe showing up on Ciao Italia? Anyway. the pork picadillo is made with alcaparrado.

 

It's a pretty versatile seasoning method. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
The red beans is making me think cols, with pickled veggies. cant think of that that is called.
post #10 of 16

Isnt' that usually pickled pork?

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Im sure once I try the alcaparrado sauce id like it, but I still dont see olive and tomato together. Im thinking lemon and maybe cream.
post #12 of 16

In this lo res video of the stuffed peppers, Daisy makes Achiote Oil and Sofrito. Then she cooks some of that, adds the Alcaparrado at about 6:40, then the ground pork. A good lesson for Puerto Rico or aspects of Latin cooking in the Americas. The PBS series Daisy Cooks was quite good in my opinion and if you have it on your local Create! channel, you should give it a try. The accompanying cookbook is likewise her best work, again imho.

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #13 of 16
Olives and tomatoes are classically paired in the Mediterranean dishes. They appear together often like in puttanesca sauce or a Greek salad. Try it!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
I believe you. maybe I could try roasted or pan seared tomatoes then?
post #15 of 16

 

 

Last night I was planning on doing a variation of puttanesca. After I got the dough made, I fell asleep at the computer many times while waiting for the dough to rest.  My workday started at 4 am, no surprise there.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 

Did you ever get around to making that? how did it turn out?

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