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Should choc covered strawberries in tempered chocolate cool at room temp or fridge?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks

post #2 of 11

Room temp NO fridge :D

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 


Voila.   It's really just an experiment in tempering chocolate without a machine but at least we can eat the results.  I'll let the thread know how it turned out.  Took a while but pretty brainless procedure.

 

Fridge eventually though, no?

post #4 of 11

No. If you place tempered chocolate into a fridge it will form condensation on it which in turn leaves the chocolate to separate and have a white bloom to it. I tend to refrigerate the strawberries and then pull them out to get to almost the same temperature as the room I am in working with the chocolate which is about 20*C before dipping and then serve the same day or store in a cooler environment that is not a fridge......aka: cold pantry.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the info.

 

Well, unfortunately I only have one fridge and it is not "cool".  :)

 

Oh well, if they *snap* I will be content.

post #6 of 11

Lol.....yea, we all make due with what we have at hand and it seems to work out all right most of the time :) I have yet to hear of a complaint from people who make and refrigerate these to give to friends and family. Something to be said for the power of chocolate and strawberries...haha

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

I have to say, the tempering was perfect, at least in the first 12 hours.  Nice color and snap.  The kids gobbled down about a dozen.

 

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-temper-chocolate-without-a-thermometer-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-196475

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpooley View Post
 


Voila.   It's really just an experiment in tempering chocolate without a machine but at least we can eat the results.  I'll let the thread know how it turned out.  Took a while but pretty brainless procedure.

 

Fridge eventually though, no?


Be still my beating heart. :bounce: Pretty!!! Have to buy more strawberries soon.

 

Thought you might enjoy some easy chocolate-covered strawberry ideas.

 

I like these long-stemmed white chocolate-covered Strawberry Roses (w/o the squiggles). (Clever idea standing them up in a colander to dry.) Bet they would be pretty as a bouquet, mixed with plain strawberries in a tall glass jar.

http://www.thepinjunkie.com/2014/01/chocolate-covered-strawberry-roses.html

 

In an ice cube tray. Right side up. Scroll down to #4.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/arielknutson/genius-ways-to-use-an-ice-cube-tray?utm_term=.gdy1DjBvp6#.ejG9gaPzNG

 

Upside down, in an ice cube tray, in a puddle of chocolate.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/08/1b/ac/081bac7f7e3a30ee84038e4ff637ab9f.jpg

 

Happy Mother's Day :)

post #9 of 11

I'm old enough to remember when somebody would mention seeding, the chefs would boo hoo. I was in Europe and all our tempering was done on marble.

When seeding became popular I took to it. I've seeded for a long time, probably a fraction of what @foodpump has. I just wanted to add to your seeding explanation.

I have found if I'm melting coins, I don't seed with coins. I find that seeding with a smaller cut portion(chopped) expedites the temper and usually gives you more working time.

I'm not at all being rude, but most of the time we're in an open kitchen. So touching products to any part of your body is gross to me. I did the lower lip thing for a while. Do yourself a favor

and purchase an instant read thermometer. especially since the skin usually has moisture. I learned this from a wise-ass German Chef. I used to touch under my lowed lip and he would yell out in broken english. Your nose and you ass are also the same temp.

Covering strawberries and cakes is unique. Just plant the idea of cold and not condensation in your head before making any moves. If I had a dollar for everyone that didn't watch their clock and remove a very cold cake from the refer and coat it, only to have it crack or sweat, I would be able to sit here and post.

If you don't have long stems, take a close look at the top. It the stem appears to have come off clean and left no residue behind, chances are, that berry will shrink inside the choco.

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post #10 of 11

My 1st time I made the mistake of putting them into the fridge. They did get a little condensation on them. However I was able to dry them off with a paper towel (photo below). After this I always leave them to harden on their own.

 

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

I'm old enough to remember when somebody would mention seeding, the chefs would boo hoo. I was in Europe and all our tempering was done on marble.

When seeding became popular I took to it. I've seeded for a long time, probably a fraction of what @foodpump has. I just wanted to add to your seeding explanation.

I have found if I'm melting coins, I don't seed with coins. I find that seeding with a smaller cut portion(chopped) expedites the temper and usually gives you more working time.

 

 - - I didn't have coins but just used 70% chopped, seeded with about 1/3.  I was surprised how long it stayed fluid after it was at temper.  Good thing it wasn't December.

 

I'm not at all being rude, but most of the time we're in an open kitchen. So touching products to any part of your body is gross to me

 

 - - I agree this is not at all acceptable for a commercial kitchen but as this was a family experiment, I did it.  At the same time I would check it, I would also check with an instant read, to get an internal gauge of the temperature.

 

I did the lower lip thing for a while. Do yourself a favor and purchase an instant read thermometer. especially since the skin usually has moisture. I learned this from a wise-ass German Chef. I used to touch under my lowed lip and he would yell out in broken english. Your nose and you ass are also the same temp.

 

 - - I would not use my ass.....

 

Covering strawberries and cakes is unique. Just plant the idea of cold and not condensation in your head before making any moves. If I had a dollar for everyone that didn't watch their clock and remove a very cold cake from the refer and coat it, only to have it crack or sweat, I would be able to sit here and post.

 

 - - Most of the trouble I have ever gotten into was from not being patient and waiting for the clock to hit the right time.  :D

 

If you don't have long stems, take a close look at the top. It the stem appears to have come off clean and left no residue behind, chances are, that berry will shrink inside the choco.


@panini   Thanks, so many good points.   My responses with ( - - )

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