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Tapenade

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
What's your recipe? Also, can tapenade be used in pasta the same way as pesto?

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post #2 of 14

     I can't find my recipe at the moment but I remember I put in pitted Kalamata olives, garlic, anchovies, capers, lemon, extra olive oil if needed. Whirl in the food processor. 

I don't  have exact amounts off the top of my head but mostly olives with the rest for flavoring so I think of them as to taste.

  So near as I can remember

Olives                          6 cups.

Garlic Fresh                 2 Tbsp

Capers                         2 oz.

Lemon                          Juice and zest of one lemon

Anchovies                     4 each. 

It can absolutely be used like pesto with pasta. Also good on toast with eggs for breakfast or as in an omelet with roasted red peppers and pesto on top. 

post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post
 

     I can't find my recipe at the moment but I remember I put in pitted Kalamata olives, garlic, anchovies, capers, lemon, extra olive oil if needed. Whirl in the food processor. 

I don't  have exact amounts off the top of my head but mostly olives with the rest for flavoring so I think of them as to taste.

  So near as I can remember

Olives                          6 cups.

Garlic Fresh                 2 Tbsp

Capers                         2 oz.

Lemon                          Juice and zest of one lemon

Anchovies                     4 each. 

It can absolutely be used like pesto with pasta. Also good on toast with eggs for breakfast or as in an omelet with roasted red peppers and pesto on top. 

Mine is the same, (except for amounts) but I add shallots and I don't use the food processor.

post #4 of 14

Mine is pretty much the same as @chefwriter 's recipe so I would start there. I would bring it down a bit as those ratios would make a fair amount of tapende. Of course you can freeze it or put it in jars I often do this with pesto and tapenade. And yes, often we used to use Tapende as a sauce for pasta it is great on grilled bread also. 

 

 

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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Sounds good!

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post #6 of 14

I like to use different types of olives for taste, texture, and color.  I also add a little roasted red pepper for color.  Other than that about the same.

post #7 of 14
Mine is similar but for me there is no recipe, only general guidelines. I use olive oil in addition to lemon juice and never use just one type of alive, though. Mix of black olives, mix of green olives, or both. And no anchovy for me. And often some ground chile pepper too. Also tend to adapt the texture - as a spread I like it fine chopped but on pasta or sandwiches I like it coarse.
Edited by BrianShaw - 4/21/16 at 6:49am
post #8 of 14

First of all, yes it can be used on pasta, just like pesto, although I tend to also add a bit more olive oil to help coat the noodles. 

 

As to my recipe for tapenade, like Brian, I only have a very basic outline and I will vary it greatly depending on what I am using it for, what I have on hand, or what my mood.  Usually my tapenade will contain both green and black olives, although I have made it with only black or only green.  I often like to make it with at least 3 varieties of olives.  It always contains garlic, olive oil, capers and lemon juice. Sometimes I add anchovies and sometimes I don't.  Sometimes I spice it up with fresh, pickled or ground chile peppers.  Sometimes it gets hand chopped and left in bigger chunks, sometimes quickly pulsed in a food processor for a finer texture, especially when I am using on a sandwich were I still want texture but I want it to hold together so as not to be too messy) and sometimes it gets processed until it is almost a paste with just a bit of texture to (kind of the consistency of pesto).  It all depends on what my final use for it will be.

post #9 of 14

Another way that I like to use tapenade, is to brush it on salmon about half an hour before grilling.

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post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

Another way that I like to use tapenade, is to brush it on salmon about half an hour before grilling.

 

I top both grilled fish and grilled chicken with it.

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Last time I made tapenade I unfortunately used sardines instead of anchovies by mistake.  It didn't go over too well with my guests.  

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

Another way that I like to use tapenade, is to brush it on salmon about half an hour before grilling.

Ooooo that sounds good!

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post #12 of 14

At the restaurant I work at, we put black olive tapenade on a crouton with one of our salads. However, the way I was taught to make it is just by putting pitted black olives in the robo-coupe and just letting that go. I often notice several of the plates come back with the tapenade crouton completely untouched, or with a single bite in it. What are some (easy) ways to make it taste better that I could bring up to the chef? 

 

Currently I just fill the robo 1/3rd of the way up with olives and let it run, stopping it occasionally to take off the occasional pit from the blade. I liked chefwriter's recipe, but would it taste radically different than the one that i currently use?

post #13 of 14

Yes, it will taste radically better. All the ingredients add something to the flavor. Ground olives is not tapenade. It's just ground olives. I'll suggest you make a small batch to see for yourself. As has been noted, my recipe amounts are meant for a restaurant but don't have to be copied exactly. It's really to taste. So add some garlic, lemon and capers first, then add some anchovies to see how you like the result. It wont' taste fishy. The anchovies just add a bit more of a flavor boost.  

    And of course, add all the other ingredients carefully so you can add more if needed, rather than adding too much right away.  Taste as you go so you can see what affect each additional ingredient has.  

If you like a bit of color, stir in some fresh chopped parsley when the tapenade is finished. Don't put the parsley in the food processor. Chop it separately and add  it last. 

post #14 of 14

My recipe is pretty much the same as Brian's.

 

I like using it on a pizza instead of a tomato based sauce

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