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Ramps

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Ramp season will be winding up here, in Wisconsin, soon.  I only got out once, although I might try again this weekend.  Luckily, my favorite hunting grounds were over run with ramps so although I only got out once, last weekend, I got quite a haul and am still eating on the ones I grilled last weekend.

 

While I love ramps in all their forms, my favorite way is grilled.  I can then use them in a variety of recipes.  Grilling couldn't be easier.  I build a fire on 1 side of the grill.  After cleaning and removing the roots (the hardest part of hunting and preparing ramps) I place the ramps on the grill with the bulbs directly over the heat while the leaves remain over the cooler part of the grill.  I grill them, turning frequently until the bulbs start to soften and char up a little then I place the whole ramps over direct heat to wilt the leaves and give them just a bit of char.  Doing it this way I can do large handfuls at a time.  The grilled ramps can be used for many thing.  One of my favorite ways is just to top hamburgers or steaks with them.  Last weekend I chopped up the grilled ramps, let them cool then made a salad of them with fresh, baby spinach, diced tomato, diced hard boiled egg and a traditional mustard vinaigrette.  I made the vinaigrette and tossed the grilled ramps in it and let that marinate for about an hour then I tossed in all the other ingredients.

 

This morning it was simply scrambled eggs with more grilled ramps, diced bacon and swiss cheese.  It will probably be what's for breakfast again tomorrow!!!

post #2 of 10

Right now we are sous-viding the bulbs and wilting the greens. I've made ramp pesto many times (the leaves mostly). I'm also fermenting some right now. Vinegar picking is always great. 

 

I might make some ramp kimchee if I find the time. 

 

Ramp and potato soup is always a favorite. I treat it a lot like potato leek soup, sweat down the bulbs with onion and shallot, EVOO and butter, then add potatoes and chicken stock (sometimes water if I feeling VEG friendly) and cook till tender. Blend, and with the blender running, add the leaves from the ramps to give extra flavor and a beautiful green color. Pass through chinny, then quick chill on ice to preserve bright green color. Touch of cream, salt TT to finish. Really, really, good. Can server hot or cold, though I tend to like hot. Just don't simmer to long on re-heat or you'll lose the color. Potato chip garnish, or fried/grilled ramps. 

 

Ramp leaf oil is fun. I've fried them like onion rings in a beer batter. 

 

They make a good relish, if you have pickled ramps. 

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 

 

 

Ramp and potato soup is always a favorite. I treat it a lot like potato leek soup, sweat down the bulbs with onion and shallot, EVOO and butter, then add potatoes and chicken stock (sometimes water if I feeling VEG friendly) and cook till tender. Blend, and with the blender running, add the leaves from the ramps to give extra flavor and a beautiful green color. Pass through chinny, then quick chill on ice to preserve bright green color. Touch of cream, salt TT to finish. Really, really, good. Can server hot or cold, though I tend to like hot. Just don't simmer to long on re-heat or you'll lose the color. Potato chip garnish, or fried/grilled ramps. 

 

 

 

This is one of my "go-to's" when I have plenty of extra.

post #4 of 10

We are still 2-3 weeks behind you. Are ramps just broke the surface last week.

 

My go to recipe is to clean then thinly slice the bulbs then caramelize them in butter and olive oil, with the greens.

I also make a morel and ramp ragout to serve over grilled Focaccia with a poached quail egg on top.

 

Ramps grow everywhere on the property here. I have a favorite place to go where you can see nothing but ramps for as far as the eyes can see.

I dehydrate them, freeze them........They are a great way to start Spring. Fiddleheads too.

post #5 of 10

These are from 2014 harvest:

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

My place isn't quite that overrun but close!!!!

post #7 of 10

A friend and I just got back from our annual ramp and asparagus hunt. We have a ramp location right by a rural road that no one else seems to frequent. Unfortunately it's about an hour drive from my place and we make a day of it so one trip a year is all I have time for. 

I typically make a ramp pesto for use all year in anything I'm making or pickled ramps I still have in the pantry. 

Now if I can just find a morel location. 

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

I suck at hunting morels!!!!!

post #9 of 10

I'd like to suck at it too if I could get someone to tell me where to look. Lots of vague info like under old apple orchards, near beech, birch, oak, maple trees, (take your pick), sandy soil, wet/dry, relative elevation, after a rain but not too much rain, and on and on. There's a  mycological group near me so I'll look into joining them. Maybe too late this year but maybe not. 

post #10 of 10

Morel spores are hard to figure out. I have a buddy who has morels by the 100's in his backyard after a good rain.

This season has been dry so far but we are expecting some rain to come in by tomorrow.....Here's hoping for a good harvest.

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