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The New Normal " How do we survive" In the new world! - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fablesable View Post
 

Listen, I have been reading this thread for a while now and as I do not entirely agree with @ChefBillyB original post I do not say he is wrong either. It will be a matter of time as to what events will ACTUALLY take place and what won't so all of the negative, knee jerk reaction to wages increasing is just that. 

 

That being said, this thread has veered off a bit as a result of a young, very inexperienced and opinionated person who is trying to say they tow the line and know all yet I believe most of us older experienced crew know better so I would suggest don't give the kid rocket fuel to play with. :eek:

 

Thank you @ChefBillyB for giving us a great thread to discuss the possible ups and downs in the future in our industry as a result of wage increase!


I posted this not for people to agree or disagree with what I posted. I think it's a good discussion typic on how each Chef will look at their own kitchen or business. In this business labor cost control has always been a big factor. I feel the min wage increase will make every operator to rethink again how their kitchen will operate. To take this a bit farther just think of how fast-food chains will approach this. It's going to be interesting on how this all washes out in the end. I know labor cost control was always a daily thought in my mind. The reason why it was in my mind was It is one of two controllable costs in my business. 

post #32 of 42

It is an incredibly interesting and widely discussed topic and highly relevant in our industry especially. I like that we all can discuss and communicate as to what our particular circumstances will challenge us with as the wages increase. It is a great thing so that maybe through discussion and valid argument we can maybe come to a consensus as to how our industry can move forward and what type of regulation, if needed, can be agreed upon for us all to adhere to moving forward for our industry. ;)

 

When I owned my businesses I walked the labour cost route first with varying outcomes and ended with paying proper living wages with benefits (in the later years). I then worked on my food cost route and found this to be a very flexible area giving me the opportunity to give people that worked for me a living wage. It wasn't a walk in the park and certainly upped my workload at the beginning when figuring it all out however, in the end produced terrific results and I would not go another route again. (then again, I do like my challenges lol) 

 

I believe for each of us it will take time and a lot of our own manpower to figure out the best course of action for our own businesses. I do look forward to seeing what we can do to improve our lives in this industry though. It is definitely not up to the government to supply us with answers but up to us in the industry to achieve them. :)

post #33 of 42

Not to be a "nudge", but wait and see.  A $50 minimum wage would still be a minimum wage, and there would be protests wanting $75.

 

My solution if it comes:

 

I'm going to divide my restaurant into two sections, half-wall down the middle.  On one side I'm going to sell chicken wings.  On the other side I'm going to sell lingerie.

 

Going to call it "Victoria's Hooters". Going to have my wife take care of the wing side.

 

<[ : ^ )

post #34 of 42
WOW.

Very good points.
post #35 of 42

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/money/more-work-more-pay-new-rule-extends-overtime-to-millions/ar-BBtbj9j?li=BBnbcA1

 

This is related to the minimum wage topic, but this new overtime law that goes in effect in the states is going to be drastically affecting our moderately small business.  Living in a smaller metropolitan area and running a small business, the salary wages offered currently are living wages, but in our business there is myself and two sous chefs (as well as several FOH) who all work an average 55-60 hour week and are all currently well under the salary cap of $47k/annual.  While all of the existing managers here would love a 25% raise to continue working those 20 hours of overtime granted every week, it is going to become too much extra for the business.  So we are having a large back and forth if it means we have to add more management staff to regulate everyone at 40 hours, or if we have to pay out that much extra.  

 

I do not have an answer to how a lot of these small businesses are going to handle it, but I see the Exec and GM getting a healthy bump and the other support management staff maintaining their currently salaries with expectations of the Exec and GM to cover more hours then since they will be grouped out of the "overtime requirement".

post #36 of 42

ChefBillyB QUOTE:

 

"I posted this not for people to agree or disagree with what I posted. I think it's a good discussion typic on how each Chef will look at their own kitchen or business. In this business labor cost control has always been a big factor. I feel the min wage increase will make every operator to rethink again how their kitchen will operate. To take this a bit farther just think of how fast-food chains will approach this. It's going to be interesting on how this all washes out in the end. I know labor cost control was always a daily thought in my mind. The reason why it was in my mind was It is one of two controllable costs in my business."

 

This should be interesting with regard to the fast food places like McDonalds, Burger King or Wendy's.

Remember that these places don't sell food, they sell real estate.

How are they going to deal with this one?

post #37 of 42

In this discussion and others I keep hearing the term "living wage."  What is a living wage?  Is it what a family of four can live on?  Is it what a single person can live on? Is it a wage that a person needs to live happily and  improve their future and save a little for retirement?  Does a living wage include enough to give proper medical care to your children?  Think about this please and let us know what you think.  I think living in a trailer park with a wife and kids and no future and week to week survival is not "living." 

post #38 of 42

Good questions.

Here is a chart I found FWIW...  http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/09/living-wage-calculator-interactive-minimum-wage/404569/

What I do know is this.... I am retired and on partial disability (pvt ins.. not SSI) and have received regular, albeit small cost of living raises every year.

Keeping this in mind I find it criminal that while the cost of living (talking food and housing only not cell phones and season tickets for the local MLB team) has been steadily rising, the usual yearly merit raises for friends and family have pretty much stopped.

What's up with that?

 

mimi

post #39 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

In this discussion and others I keep hearing the term "living wage."  What is a living wage?  Is it what a family of four can live on?  Is it what a single person can live on? Is it a wage that a person needs to live happily and  improve their future and save a little for retirement?  Does a living wage include enough to give proper medical care to your children?  Think about this please and let us know what you think.  I think living in a trailer park with a wife and kids and no future and week to week survival is not "living." 


Your right "Living wage" isn't a real good term when talking about a min wage. If a family lived like they did in the 50's it would be real difficult in todays world. with (Ward) Mr Cleaver going to work, (June)  Mom staying home with the kids and keeping the house together when Wally and the Beaver went to school. IMHO, the so called living wage today would keep a family of four in Poverty, food stamps and food bank lines. The new $15 wage would put the bread winner of the family making a gross wage of $31,300 a year. The so called living wage in America would make you a rich man in some countries but, not this one. I think you would need to dbl that in order to live reasonably. Just think of what a single Mom would go through trying to pay rent with two kids. I think the biggest problem with a family trying to live on lower wages is trying to live on those wages in a high cost area. The reason my wife and I left Hawaii is because we knew we would never be able to afford a house and family on our wages. I don't see many good endings to the $15 min wage increase. I think the story line will be, I'm making more money and working less hours. This is a win loose approach to this increase. I also think your going to see many more senior citizens working longer and going back to work. You see, these people weren't making a living wage when they retired. These people are living on $12,000 to $18,000 a year. Even if a senior works 20 hrs a week at $15 an hour they can pull in 16K tax free or more a year. I can see a battle for these jobs, the new problem will be people saying I can't even find a min wage job anymore. I always said, Watch what you wish for it just may come true.......

post #40 of 42

I can't help but think this min wage raise thing is just a way to decrease the number of people on assistance.

That the higher take home wage will push them just over that cutoff line that qualifies the household for SNAP or whatever.

I worry most about the kids who qualify for the school lunch program... those meals are sometimes the only hot food they get all week.

 

mimi

post #41 of 42

The lottery jackpot will certainly get bigger.

post #42 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View PostI can see a battle for these jobs, the new problem will be people saying I can't even find a min wage job anymore. I always said, Watch what you wish for it just may come true.......

Even Robert Reich admits as much; a dramatic increase in the minimum wage will push those on the fringes completely out of the job market. The theory though is that it will elevate enough people out of poverty and off of the dole to more than offset the few that will need more assistance.  I am a progressive but maybe more realistic than some, probably because I  have been a chef for 25 years.  The figures don't lie especially when you work for a small sole proprietorship like I do.  Either the money is there or it is not, you can afford it or you cannot.

 

Speaking for myself if I have to pay someone $15 then there's no point to hiring a kid.  I really wish that calls for $15 included a youth worker exemption.  If you could hire a kid under 17 for, say, $10/hour then it would give kids a shot at getting their first job without taking away a better job that an adult could be working.

 

Ultimately I see the pendulum swinging that direction.  Income inequality is perhaps the worst it's ever been in human history; that probably can't continue much longer before we have anarchy or revolution.  A lot of people are angry.  There's an attitude of "let's do something- even if it's wrong".

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
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