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Using frozen bread dough

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi, folks.

For various reasons, in-house breading is out of the question for me.  Do any of you have any experience using frozen bread doughs such as from Rich's or Bridgeford?

 

Never done much baking, actually don't care much for it, but I need to menu some bread items.

 

Any helpful tips or tricks concerning the frozen dough available from foodservice companies would be appreciated.

 

I think there are certain things to pay attention to, such as proofing, etc.  Have heard you can use a finger to poke the dough to see if it's ready to go into the oven, and things like that.

 

I'm sure using frozen is heresy to most of you, but like I said, making fresh dough is out of the question.

 

So, any help would really be appreciated.

 

Thanks much for any advice.

 

Ray

post #2 of 6
I would go for parbaked rolls rather than proof and bake, able to be popped in the oven on the fly without waste
post #3 of 6

I've used Rich's and Brisgeford in some of my employee cafe operations. We had a proofer and they raised real nice. The items I used were, hoagie rolls, Italian loaves, Kaiser rolls and cinnamon rolls. For my operation it was a nice way of getting consistency in the product. I though the products we used brought a nice fresh baked approach to these operations.

post #4 of 6

Frozen bread doughs are great as long as you use them correctly and of course if they are a quality product.  I can't remember the name of the company I used to use in Seattle but their products were fantastic and they were locally produced.

 

I just had to make sure everyone knew to thaw them before tossing them in the proofer as park house rolls with half ripped off tops are certainly breathtaking for presentation.  (The outside of the roll would thaw and proof before the middle was even thawed.  

 

However, par baked goods as a previous poster said, can go from freezer to oven in no time flat and they still have that fresh baked quality.

 

Sorry I haven't had any experience with Bridgeford but we used to us Rich's for their cinnamon rolls.  I never heard any complaints, everyone thought they were made on site.

post #5 of 6

I've had good luck with Rich's as well.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi, and thanks much for the suggestions, I appreciate them.

I'm going to try the frozen demi-loaves in one of glazed strapped pans and see how it works out.  It was suggested that I take them out the night before, brush them with melted butter and cover them.  The guy also said when you see little bubbles all over it was time to go into the oven.

The way I figure it, the worst that can happen is I wind up either eating a lot of bread or making a bunch of bread crumbs or croutons.

 

Thanks again, we'll see how it goes.

 

I hate flour.  April was 25 years in business (this time) and I don't think I've ever baked anything from scratch.  My excuse is that the yeast might get in the air and then get in the refrigeration units and eat them.

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