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Chef - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rndmchef View Post

However, I'm somebody that would rather not do anything as opposed to doing something half way or the wrong way. I don't want to put my name on something that I don't think is the best it could be. (Perfectionist)

Sadly, it sounds like you will not do anything then, because nothing will ever be the best that it could be.

 

Not doing anything because of an all or nothing perfectionist mindset, can also be an easy cop out.

 

Not doing anything is also an oxymoron.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

Not doing anything because of an all or nothing perfectionist mindset, can also be an easy cop out.

Not doing anything is also an oxymoron.

I recognize this and agree , without a doubt . You are correct .

But the first part..."You likely won't do anything, nothing will ever be the best that it could be"

I disagree. IMO perfection is attainable . But that's kind of a different topic.
post #33 of 55

Yeah-butt, how are you going to perfect running a place, if you never start?

 

Perfection just doesn't happen, you got to work at it..  Me?  20 years running my own place and I can never say it was easy.  Do-able, yes, but easy, no way.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rndmchef View Post


You didn't read my whole post...

Because most people who open a restaurant want to serve good food. However, some don't care. And the only reason they're a chef or owner of a restaurant is to make $$. So they serve food that is premade or simply just stupidly simple and plain. ....

It's hard to run a restaurant and profit when you're caring about the food you sell to your customers. If all you care about is bringing in more money than you spend ; it's NOT hard to run a restaurant .

Buy bulk, cheap ground beef. Buy bulk, cheap potatoes. Form your own burger patties, don't use any seasoning . Cut and blanch your own fries , only once a week and in mass quantities so your not wasting time/money doing it everyday. You can freeze some if your concerned about not using them in time(same with bulk ground beef).
Then buy cheap, bulk American cheese. And cheap, bulk hamburger buns. Buy a LOT for a discount; freeze whatever you need to.
Then buy premade deep fryer food; i.e.: calamari, breaded shrimp, cheese filled jalapeños, Mac n cheese bites, etc....
Sell them at a price point that allows you a good profit..
Buy mass onions and flour for onion rings; and mass yogurt too.
Bulk chicken for chicken sandwiches. Use the same buns as for hamburgers...
Buy bulk iceberg or romaine for salads, along with bulk carrots and cucumbers for garnish . Create your own simple dressings with cheap oil .
Is it good food? No, but I would make a profit .

Prep for such stupidly simple food could be done by one guy , if necessary.... Hire 3 line cooks for service(and make cleaning of the kitchen optional) and your labor cost is quite low...


lol.....Don't have a clue, do you? Bulk this, bulk that. We all buy wholesale. That IS bulk. What do you think, tell your broadline you'll buy 10 cases of iceburg or ground beef or buns and you'll magically get them at a greatly reduced price that will guarantee you profitability? Mass onions.... Mass yogurt? WTF is that in your mind "chef"?

post #35 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rndmchef View Post


You didn't read my whole post...

Because most people who open a restaurant want to serve good food. However, some don't care. And the only reason they're a chef or owner of a restaurant is to make $$. So they serve food that is premade or simply just stupidly simple and plain. ....

It's hard to run a restaurant and profit when you're caring about the food you sell to your customers. If all you care about is bringing in more money than you spend ; it's NOT hard to run a restaurant .

Buy bulk, cheap ground beef. Buy bulk, cheap potatoes. Form your own burger patties, don't use any seasoning . Cut and blanch your own fries , only once a week and in mass quantities so your not wasting time/money doing it everyday. You can freeze some if your concerned about not using them in time(same with bulk ground beef).
Then buy cheap, bulk American cheese. And cheap, bulk hamburger buns. Buy a LOT for a discount; freeze whatever you need to.
Then buy premade deep fryer food; i.e.: calamari, breaded shrimp, cheese filled jalapeños, Mac n cheese bites, etc....
Sell them at a price point that allows you a good profit..
Buy mass onions and flour for onion rings; and mass yogurt too.
Bulk chicken for chicken sandwiches. Use the same buns as for hamburgers...
Buy bulk iceberg or romaine for salads, along with bulk carrots and cucumbers for garnish . Create your own simple dressings with cheap oil .
Is it good food? No, but I would make a profit .

Prep for such stupidly simple food could be done by one guy , if necessary.... Hire 3 line cooks for service(and make cleaning of the kitchen optional) and your labor cost is quite low...

 

Spoken like a true dishwasher.

post #36 of 55
lol

What I was getting at was... Having food delivered once a week or less . As opposed to getting fresh product everyday...
Buy a LOT, don't worry that it might not be nearly as fresh or tasty in a few days, just enjoy the ease of ordering once a week.
This isn't a crazy idea I made up. I've seen very profitable restaurants do this exact thing.
You know how some places will advertise "no freezers here!" ... I've seen places that have 6 or 7 freezers.

Mass/bulk quantities would be an amount that is not used for an extended period of time after delivery, resulting in product either being thrown away or simply sold to customers at less than desirable standards . Not rotten or potentially hazardous items (usually) but just items that must be covered up with a strong flavor in order to keep the customer from knowing its old product ...
post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rndmchef View Post


You didn't read my whole post...

Because most people who open a restaurant want to serve good food. However, some don't care. And the only reason they're a chef or owner of a restaurant is to make $$. So they serve food that is premade or simply just stupidly simple and plain. ....

It's hard to run a restaurant and profit when you're caring about the food you sell to your customers. If all you care about is bringing in more money than you spend ; it's NOT hard to run a restaurant .

Buy bulk, cheap ground beef. Buy bulk, cheap potatoes. Form your own burger patties, don't use any seasoning . Cut and blanch your own fries , only once a week and in mass quantities so your not wasting time/money doing it everyday. You can freeze some if your concerned about not using them in time(same with bulk ground beef).
Then buy cheap, bulk American cheese. And cheap, bulk hamburger buns. Buy a LOT for a discount; freeze whatever you need to.
Then buy premade deep fryer food; i.e.: calamari, breaded shrimp, cheese filled jalapeños, Mac n cheese bites, etc....
Sell them at a price point that allows you a good profit..
Buy mass onions and flour for onion rings; and mass yogurt too.
Bulk chicken for chicken sandwiches. Use the same buns as for hamburgers...
Buy bulk iceberg or romaine for salads, along with bulk carrots and cucumbers for garnish . Create your own simple dressings with cheap oil .
Is it good food? No, but I would make a profit .

Prep for such stupidly simple food could be done by one guy , if necessary.... Hire 3 line cooks for service(and make cleaning of the kitchen optional) and your labor cost is quite low...


And all those items that need to be frozen will be put into magical boxes which don't cost an arm and a leg to maintain and which get free power.

post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

Yeah-butt, how are you going to perfect running a place, if you never start?

 

Perfection just doesn't happen, you got to work at it..  Me?  20 years running my own place and I can never say it was easy.  Do-able, yes, but easy, no way.


agreed, 2.5 years in and i learn to do something better every day.  at 20years, its probably once a week, but still.....lol

post #39 of 55

My 2 cents for the OP, Not true.

My 2 cents about Chef vs Cook. After spending a few weeks in the industry my version is, A good Cook possesses the ability to focus and produce a couple of items really well.

A good Chef possesses the ability stated above and also has the logistical  knowledge to oversee the production of all items.

I have never been on board to meld the General Managers, Food Service Directors, Accountings, job                                                                                      

 

 description into the Chefs position as far as financial responsibility without help. Sure, the Chef has to be                                                                                    

 

aware, but  responsible? That's a daunting task and I have not met to many that can do it without depriving

 some area of the operation of his or her knowledge and expertise. I know the FSD,GEN.MNGR,ETC  also                                                                                             answer to higher---, but usually don't have a clue and have to resort to the 'sharp stick in the eye' routine with the Chef concerning numbers.

 

Quote:


agreed, 2.5 years in and i learn to do something better every day.  at 20years, its probably once a week, but still.....lol

If you learning to do something better, again, I think logistics. After 20 yrs. you still learn daily, maybe weekly job related, daily I learn that I was correct in not letting

my children enter this primitive and antiquate business concept.

I believe if I spent 45 yrs. in another industry, whether it be tenure or merit raises, I would probably realize triple the compensation of someone in our industry.

remember, my 2 cents

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #40 of 55

The one thing I learned as a Chef is, I would rather teach a dishwasher that really wants to learn how to cook, rather than listen to line cooks bitch and tell me how wonderful and irreplaceable. 

 

CapeCodChef The line cook chef thinks we should all spend the morning picking out vegetables every morning. The clueless remain clueless! He must think we all run a B&B in Napa Valley.....

post #41 of 55

He also seems to think that the all natural nonfat Greek yogurt I ordered this week with a July 3 "best by" date would be "fresher" if I ordered it daily.

 

It's the comment that it's "easy" to be profitable that tells me all I needed to know.

 

And to the thread topic at hand, culinary school graduation doesn't make one a chef automatically, nor is it a prerequisite to becoming one.

post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

 

Is this based on personal experience from having accomplished this in your career?


Again cheflayne hit the nail on the head.

 

To answer the original question. No you do not have to go to school to become a chef.  The more education you have will make it easier.  There is much much more to being a chef than just cooking.

post #43 of 55

Great post. I opened my namesake restaurant in 1989. I could cook (still can) but I was also lucky enough to have worked for someone who taught me proper service. Anyway, I will never forget the first CIA Grad I hired. I was nervous because I had learned everything through working. After four hour of watching him work I wondered to myself, "What the hell did they teach you"? Having a "degree" doesn't mean anything. My Ex-wife's Grandmother could outcook about any chef in my town, but she was just a "cook". My point is, call yourself a Chef when you want to. Titles are meaningless.

post #44 of 55

rndmchef...here's my simple question.  You just finished some vegetable prep, or cuting veggies for a stew.  The picture here is of your garbage bowl.  In your expert opinion...what do you do with the trash?

 

Serious question...what do you do with the trash in the garbage bowl?

 

post #45 of 55

Wash all very well with cold water and then make a vegetable stock by covering with cold water, bring to a simmer and simmer for an hour. Strain well and refrigerate. Use in place of water anytime you are making soups, stews, sauteed items, etc. Adds flavor. The vegetables left can then be composted for my herb garden. That's how I used stuff like you had in your bowl.

post #46 of 55
Quote:
"... we all run a B&B in Napa Valley....."

That, is nice work ... if you can get it. 

 

Quote:
"...what do you do with the trash in the garbage bowl?"

Sounds like a good plan, Chefjazz2018. That's what I do anyway. 

post #47 of 55
I was going to say veg stock as well. ...

I would add.... If you have a good amount of vegetable scrap to make into stock and you don't want to take up a bunch of room in your cold storage or use containers that you may need for something else...
Simply boil down the stock until it becomes a paste (very thick).. This can then be kept in the freezer (or fridge) for a good amount of time without sacrificing any quality. When you want/need stock, reconstitute the paste with water to the desired strength.
This is essentially bouillon cubes, except much healthier and tastier and without all the salt.
post #48 of 55
And I'm far from an expert....However, I have the passion of an expert(imho)

I'm no expert or world class chef(yet), however I'm still better than the majority and the average.
Common sense is not common. Also, common sense goes a LONG way in the US today. . If you have common sense, it's quite likely you will be very, very successful in the US today.
post #49 of 55

well one can attend a community collage (or a local 2 yr culinary school) that offers food service program and become a certified professional cook.  but to b a certified working-ex chef or a master chef  one needs to take a few collage courses.  nutrition-and a couple others.  not many.  also must have that certified food handler by the county/city.  i also had to enter a food show(remember those!) and host one local chefs meeting.  had to have x amount of work experience in years as in my case for a certified executive chef.  more points for private club/hotel work. now the kicker, had to pay a couple hundred bucks for the certification.  master chef is a lot harder as i knew some fellows who did the test. i did this a number of years ago(now retired) so things may have changed.  the criteria for this is out there now with the internet

ldiat  

ps this was done in the pittsburgh chapter of the chefs and cooks association.

post #50 of 55
No, one does not need to go to school to be a chef. Considering this... I find it funny to see the local (Sacramento) restaurants advertising "Must have culinary degree" or "culinary degree preferred"

But, I recently realized, the real reason some restaurants are looking for culinary degrees(whether it's the chef, kitchen manager or the owner that is asking) is because they don't know how to run a kitchen properly or efficiently and so they are looking for somebody to come and help them do their job and have the new cook try to figure out how to not have such a horrible, inefficient kitchen.

The people who know how to run a kitchen properly are NOT looking for people with a culinary degree; they are looking for people with common sense and a great work ethic . That's why Alinea in Chicago advertises on a regular basis that they are ALWAYS looking for FOH and BOH and that they are not interested in culinary degrees, they're looking for people who know how to work and think.
post #51 of 55
And this /\ is coming from someone (me) who spent 4 1/2 years at culinary school for an associates degree. Mind you this associates degree involved 95 credit hours....
I don't regret one second of it. I met awesome chefs who taught me a lot and I still have stacks of books/papers from school that I read everyday in order to keep my knowledge from fading.
But, I also recognize there are two ways to skin a cat.
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Lancaster View Post
 

rndmchef...here's my simple question.  You just finished some vegetable prep, or cuting veggies for a stew.  The picture here is of your garbage bowl.  In your expert opinion...what do you do with the trash?

 

Serious question...what do you do with the trash in the garbage bowl?

 

 

Trash gets thrown out. That is called "trim" or "scraps." 

 

I also don't personally use peels in my veg stock, but most other stuff is fair game to me. 

post #53 of 55

Once it is in the garbage it is no longer fit for human consumption.  I feed it to the chickens.

post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rndmchef View Post

Simply boil down the stock until it becomes a paste (very thick).. This can then be kept in the freezer (or fridge) for a good amount of time without sacrificing any quality. When you want/need stock, reconstitute the paste with water to the desired strength.
 

 

 

Have you ever, personally, done this, mdmchef?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Lancaster View Post
 

rndmchef...here's my simple question.  You just finished some vegetable prep, or cuting veggies for a stew.  The picture here is of your garbage bowl.  In your expert opinion...what do you do with the trash?

 

Serious question...what do you do with the trash in the garbage bowl?

 

 

Sorry, some you thought this was a general question.  No real need to answer it.

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