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iSi Gourmet Whip Rapid Infusion

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

So I just came across the iSi Gourmet Whip Rapid Infusion and am completely intrigued with the idea of this.  I had no idea something like this existed.  I love checking out the world of professional chefs!

 

Has anyone used this or other similar type infusers?  Does it elevate flavor infusions in a way that traditional methods cannot?

 

I would be interested in using it for infusing oils.

post #2 of 7

i have the ISI with the Rapid Infusion kit.

 

I have found that blanching green herbs then blending with oil, resting for 2 days and then filtering gives a nice bright green heavily scented oil.. but the ISI gives a rather mild infusion. I personally do the traditional method and follow up with the ISI just to put the gun to good use but to be honest its not the best application of the science... I have found that popping some chicken strips with some light soy sauce into the canister and doing the shaky-shake makes the soy penetrate the chicken within minutes and then I just toss the chicken through some potato fecule, rce starch, or sweet potato starch and deep fry for some really tasty quick and easy Taiwanese Fried Chicken

 

so if your looking for intense flavor and colour is wanted then stay with traditional methods, but if you desire an oil that is mildly scented, and has no colour infused then the ISI is a good choice.. or to superspeed marination of a small amount of meat etc.

 

also to be aware of is that the recipes on the ISI website can have multiples with same title and picture but different ratios for ingredients, and the app gives different recipes again, so just because the recipe is on the website or in the app does not automatically make the recipe correct, or suitable for your purposes, though it is a good reference point to start experimenting and come up with your own end recipes.

post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefShaneS View Post
 

i have the ISI with the Rapid Infusion kit.

 

I have found that blanching green herbs then blending with oil, resting for 2 days and then filtering gives a nice bright green heavily scented oil.. but the ISI gives a rather mild infusion. I personally do the traditional method and follow up with the ISI just to put the gun to good use but to be honest its not the best application of the science... I have found that popping some chicken strips with some light soy sauce into the canister and doing the shaky-shake makes the soy penetrate the chicken within minutes and then I just toss the chicken through some potato fecule, rce starch, or sweet potato starch and deep fry for some really tasty quick and easy Taiwanese Fried Chicken

 

so if your looking for intense flavor and colour is wanted then stay with traditional methods, but if you desire an oil that is mildly scented, and has no colour infused then the ISI is a good choice.. or to superspeed marination of a small amount of meat etc.

 

also to be aware of is that the recipes on the ISI website can have multiples with same title and picture but different ratios for ingredients, and the app gives different recipes again, so just because the recipe is on the website or in the app does not automatically make the recipe correct, or suitable for your purposes, though it is a good reference point to start experimenting and come up with your own end recipes.

I too infuse my oils by blanching and reserving in the oil. I do this with cilantro and basil. I just saw a video of a man making a jalapeño infused tequila drink using the isi rapid infusion kit.

Maybe if you left the oil and herb inside the whipper for a day or two. If you blanched the herb initially, rough chopped and placed it in the whipper to rest? Also using more than one co2 charge.

 

Have you tried blanching, blending and whipping it with two co2 charges?

 

My ratios for the herb oil is 500g of neutral oil and 200g of herbs.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 


This is great information and what I was looking for.  Thank you!  

 

So in doing a double infusion, first by traditional means, and then following up with ISI - it sounds like you do this more so because you already own the ISI and not because the ISI for round two takes the infusion from good to great, right?

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 


Luis, I had never thought to consider using two chargers.  Thanks for the tip.

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbnyc View Post
 


This is great information and what I was looking for.  Thank you!  

 

So in doing a double infusion, first by traditional means, and then following up with ISI - it sounds like you do this more so because you already own the ISI and not because the ISI for round two takes the infusion from good to great, right?


that's right :)

 

because I want a strong flavour and aroma, and not just a mild infusion I have found that blanched herbs that are blended with oil is more suitable to my needs, and the ISI infusion is really just insurance policy that I get it as good as can be, and not because the ISI rapid infusion does any noticeable improvement.

 

leaving to settle for a day or two in the ISI with enhance the effects of the "Nitrogen Cavitation" by allowing the nitrous to penetrate further into the ingredient structure which will certainly help with ensuring that you have "infused" as much flavor as possible.

 

soft green herbs require "delicate" handling in order to extract the flavor and chlorophyll and not suffer degradation/oxidation, so it important to not expose to too much heat for too long. for example when blanching herbs such as basil (before blending in oil) its important to do for not more than 20 seconds, the last time I did for 30 seconds and the different between it and a previous effort was remarkable with less flavor and colour present in the final oil product.

 

you may find other methods for oil extraction ("supercritical fluid extraction", etc) but that is for extracting the oil of the plant and not for imparting/infusing flavor to a bulk (carrier) oil that will be wanted for cookery purposes.

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

ChefShaneS, thanks for sharing the nuances with me.  I find that lacking in most cookbooks & blogs.  Your precision (20 seconds, not 30 for blanching soft green herbs) is exactly what I'm looking for.  

 

I'm guessing this kind of knowledge about infusions comes only with the experience of a professional chef, but if there are any books or blogs you would recommend, let me know.  Oil infusions is something I've recently become passionate about, but the info out there about it is somewhat sporadic.  

 

Thanks for the input!!!!!

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