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Sfogliatelle

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Any one good at making these? I have had trouble get the layers down. Tried using our sheeter but wont roll that thin. I just got a wide pasta roller to see if that may help. Any suggestion would be great. Cake boss says he pipes choux paste in his for the puff but mine didn't come out so swell. Thanks

post #2 of 12

I have attempted making them once and my results weren't great. I usually work at things until I get them down, but I never attempted a second try at this because I just wasn't wild about this particular pastry in the first place. You definitely need a pasta roller for this. Sheeters never go thin enough.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your reply. I bought a used wide pasta machine and the dough is still seems tough but even though I did at least 4 4 folds like puff and it came out out close but seemed tough on the edges. I have never eaten one so not much to go by.

post #4 of 12

@D Whiz .......check this video out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hr-yaD1Gc1Y

 

The first 5 minutes is just a lot of dough stretching. This dough is a lot like phyllo/strudel dough. It has to be thin enough to see through, and not even a pasta roller gets it that thin, so doing it the way the video shows is probably the best way to go to get a good pastry. Check it out!

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

I will watch the video and reply. I made today and divide the dough into 5 portions and ran it through until I was on the 3 settings and did a series of four folds two at a time allowing it rest covered until all were done. I then rolled each piece slowly down until I got to 2 settings and brushed down with equal of butter and lard blend melted and streched the piece until u could see through them so I had a good window structure  and rolled and continued adding each piece until a big old log was done then wrapped with plastic and put in the figerator lol 24 hours. I then did the clam shell thing and stuff some with choux paste and some with the classic riccotta semolina flour filling brushed then with B/L blend and baked at 375 for about 30 minutes. Both came out out though and looked close but not like Chef Buddys that come out 8 inch long though and the ones with choux paste were baked but thought still tasted raw but now that they a more a carnival dessert with the pastry cream/ whipped butterceam filling people said they like them. I though they looked right but were more though more than flaky,Well with all that said and more tips? I can keep trying until I get it down.

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

I watched the video and yes it was like making strudel but taking it to the phyllo stage. I really wish there was a part two so I could see his final product. The world says we need to wrap and refrigerate before handling and I would love to see if you could cut that stage out and just go for it  and it works !!. It would be a real shame to go thru all that work and blow it. But trust many a time they have taken orders for time senstive products and you just have to produce and pull the perfect final product out of your chef, and don't forget with a sincere smile. Thanks  

post #7 of 12

Well, you are multiple attempts at it ahead of me, that's for sure. I hope someone who has made them successfully can chime in at some point.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your blessing and hopefully someone will hear my cry for tips. I will beat this and to bad I can't post a final product.

post #9 of 12

@D Whiz,

I just caught your post. I'm on my way out the door but just wanted to mention,You have to retard the dough, it needs a rest.  both dough and butter/lard have to be the same temperature.

I've made them with pulled dough and have rolled the dough on a sheeter.

I prefer the sheeter. I run long sheets, approx. 7-8". As the dough starts to relax, I roll the long run up on a stick. From the stick, I pull and stretch a little and start to roll. I spread a thin layer of fat ahead of me as I roll. I end up with a roll about 9" wide and 5-7" high. This sleeps over night.

  The next morning it's quite stiff. I get after it with a rolling pin and my hands. I form a snake, without rolling. Then slice. Make sure you start your indenture slowly until you can invert it in your hands.

gtg

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tips !! I am pretty close to your game on the dough. I bought a used wide past roller and take it down slowly to the 2 setting and stretch out super thin onto the bench right out of the machine but not before a doing a series of two four folds before letting it rest covered until I have done all the pieces of dough.. I have a great window in the dough to the point I could read a newspaper thru it. I roll out three pieces overlapping into each final roll stretched strudel thin. I think my major error was I was told that they bake at 375 for 30 minutes but it didn't make sense since you have choux paste for the puff in it and maybe 375 if your baking swan necks or something but at least 400 to get your pop and dry the dough you know lol. So I made a new batch today even even coated the outside of the final roll with the lard /butter blend before wrapping it in plastic wrap. I was finding the outside edge was though but also I watch A LOT OF VIDEOS  for to what is a common technic. I will be baking at 400 till center is dry but still not sure if I should brush them with the butter/lard blend before baking. I have been but was worried that was why they browned so fast before the center was cooked. I know better but I am also I male blonde and have my moments. I know blah blah blah : }... I will let u know how they turn out. Thanks for your time.

 

 I have made s batch with the classic semolina riccotta filling with no choux paste but they looked like perfect clam shells but though and didn't have a crisp crunch for all the layers that where there. Maybe it's just PASTRY KARMA.beating me down but the fight continues

post #11 of 12

@D Whiz,

This is just my preference or take,

You need to brush them before hitting the oven. The goal you are trying to achieve is for the butter/lard mixture to start frying the dough between the layers. The outside brush will expedite this process. If your not getting layer separation and crispiness, and your not getting fat leaking, than i would suggest going a little heavier on the smear when rolling.

  Also, your roux for the choux should be quite dry. I use a water base pate a choux, no dairy product at all. I also use a little less salt. I'm not looking for richness or flavor impact. For this item only.

I'm sure you know choux paste but I find the only way to really dry out the roux is to cook it as long as I can in the pot to release the H2O. Then I put it in a mixer and paddle it. You will see the steam evaporate. The excess water in the roux is your enemy. The eggs aren't. If you leave excess water in your roux, you won't get the pop you really need. It will also inhibit the hollowing out of the paste and lose it's structure.

For me personally, the choux should not impart any flavor, it should just be a thin crisp vessel for the filling. A good Sfogliatelle is one that when you bite into it, the only moisture/softness you encounter is that of the filling. This is just my preference. I grease down the logs and freeze them. I use the freezer as a tool and not storage. This allows me to form and bake quickly. I dislike them if they sit at all after baking. They should be enjoyed as they are cooling from the oven.

 My 2 cents

:lips: Nothing better than to enjoy a merenda munching sfogliatella and sipping an espresso or a light Sambuca cocktail.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply and I agree entirely. I do my choux the text book method as you said and this batch  of  tails came out pretty well but I think I may need to go heaver the lard blend because I do make sure the entire surface is covered but very thin so I will go heaver and I have been placing the log in the refrigerator an they firm but nowhere near hard because I slice and flatten with my palm with no problem. Do you flat yours first and work out the layers in your hands or do form them in your hand only? You know what I mean. I wonder if that makes a difference but I do carefully stretch them out the traditional way cupped in my hand. I made a batch finished with choux paste already in the freezer to see how the come out of the oven after I allow them  to come to room temp before bake but haven't thanks for all your help and trust me I take it all in. Have A good day. What temp do you bake yours at? I bake mine at 400 for about 20 minutes and turned the oven down beacuse they were getting to brown for me but the choux was still a little wet. Have you hit yours with crystal white sugar before the bake for a different extra crunch factor? Timers calling LOL 

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