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question about coffee

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I saw this video today and am interested about the difference between a coffee with more body and clarity. Is the best way to try the two by visiting a local barista? I dont think a local shop will be able to show me the difference as they will have A machine that makes their coffee. Im guessing they would have one or the other, and not both.

 

Video @ 1:40

 

http://www.sciencefriday.com/videos/gear-for-your-coffee-grounds-2/ 

post #2 of 23

Hey Bob, I don't think the local coffee shop will have time t do this for you. You could do it yourself at home by either pouring hot water over grounds once using a finer and coffee. Or you could use a percolator like I use to run the coffee over and over the ground coffee that will give you a different result the longer you perk. In many cases you will look for a degree of roast that you like. Then you can have the bean that is posted to the degree that you like be ground either fine or a bit less than fine. Remember that the longer you roast a bean the less caffeine. This is something you can do at home with whatever method you like to get hot wanter flowing over the ground coffee.......Good luck.....Chef Bill

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

is it true that you need a burr coffee grinder to get good results?

 

The video seems to indicate that the tools shown in the video are good at either clarity or body, with a few inbetween. But that its a trade off between the two. I'm assuming I cant get examples of both without having multiple setups?

post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post

Hey Bob, I don't think the local coffee shop will have time t do this for you. You could do it yourself at home by either pouring hot water over grounds once using a finer and coffee. Or you could use a percolator like I use to run the coffee over and over the ground coffee that will give you a different result the longer you perk. In many cases you will look for a degree of roast that you like. Then you can have the bean that is posted to the degree that you like be ground either fine or a bit less than fine. Remember that the longer you roast a bean the less caffeine. This is something you can do at home with whatever method you like to get hot wanter flowing over the ground coffee.......Good luck.....Chef Bill

Does that mean French toast is less caffeine than a blonde roast? This is confusing because I prefer a more robust coffee which I thought was stronger (more caffeinated) than a light roast.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


Does that mean French toast is less caffeine than a blonde roast? This is confusing because I prefer a more robust coffee which I thought was stronger (more caffeinated) than a light roast.


It means that if a French fry is cook less it will have more nutrients than a fully cook French fry. As for coffee " The greener the bean the more caffeine" When it comes to the amount of roasting your taking about flavor. 

post #6 of 23

Why don't you try it by yourself, it will be an interesting experiment. 

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtheman View Post
 

is it true that you need a burr coffee grinder to get good results?

 

The video seems to indicate that the tools shown in the video are good at either clarity or body, with a few inbetween. But that its a trade off between the two. I'm assuming I cant get examples of both without having multiple setups?


Bob, this is all about you pouring a certain amount of water over a ground bean to give you the results you want. Finding the perfect cup of coffee for each person isn't easy to accomplish. This is why most places will get something in a medium roast that will satisfy most all people. I'm really not sure what grinders are the best. I have one it does the job for me. There isn't only one thing to look at when seeking out the perfect blend for you. I would start with a grinder. When you see how much of a grind you get then you can figure out how to do the rest. What we talked about earlier was. With a fine ground you will not have to keep the hot water flowing over the coffee very long in order to extract all the flavor from the grind. If you have a "less" of course ground to the bean it will take longer to extract all the flavor from the bean. It's all about grind and amount of flavor you want. This is a process but your getting closer. .........Doe the make sense ?????..........Bob, check and see if there are any places in town that roast their own coffee. You may be about to get your coffee roasted to your own liking.

post #8 of 23
I have an Aeropress, Chemex, Technivorn and a Siphon. One of my very first jobs alongside working in kitchens was roasting coffee back in the day. I worked for a company that was a competitor to Starbucks back in the 70's. I am very passionate about coffee and all of its forms!!
Coffee is the most diverse when it comes to flavour profiles. They have documented around 2000 flavour profiles for wine and well over 4000+ flavour profiles for coffee. Amazing huh??
It comes down to experimenting what works for you and your tastebuds. You can learn by cupping which is taught by small local roasters. If you let me know where you live I can source some local cupping places.
Other than that it is about investment as well. Most of the equipment used is not very expensive and reasonable to buy to experiment with. I usually tell people to get a goose neck kettle, a Chemex and a burr grinder. There are handheld burr grinders that will do a decent job so no need to break the bank. You do not need fine grinds as this causes more bitter flavours to happen to you cup of coffee. You want more of a French press larger grind so there is more even flow and extraction happening so there will be no bitterness left on you palate. The goose neck kettle is to ensure that when you pour the water you have control over the flow as well as you must pour from the middle out and not touch the sides of the filter with your pour as that will harm the flavour extraction process. Regular kettles can't help with the water pouring control as they splash everywhere.
Patience is also a key thing when extracting. You can't rush a good cup of coffee and most pour overs take about 2-3mins to get a fairly perfect extraction.
I could go on however I have to run out the door for a while. Hope some of this helps and if you want some great extraction times and grinds let me know and I will send you some!!
post #9 of 23

I am definitely a coffeehead. My methods are old school and inexpensive, but for me they make for an outstanding cuppa. Being somewhat crazed, I also enjoy the whole process, very hands on and pleasurable, akin to making bread. Meditative and reflective, but I digress, so at any rate...

 

I roast beans, usually to the verge of second crack, in a pan on my stove top. I stay a day ahead, so the beans can rest. I grind them in a mortar and pestle to a consistency similar to what is used for a French press. I put the ground beans in wide mouth decanter. I bring water up to 205 degrees then bloom the ground beans for 30 seconds before pouring in the remaining water. At about 2 minutes I stir the brew with wooden chopsticks. 3 minutes later I pour through a coffee sock into a thermal keeper pot.

 

Then I enjoy the fruits of the process. Ahhh! The simple pleasures of life.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #10 of 23

I use this percolator every morning. It was my Father-in-laws bought in the 50's at Sears. I need to take new world filters and make a hole so they slide down over the water stem into the coffee basket. 

 

post #11 of 23
I love how for a lot of us making coffee is a ritual that we get a wonderfully tasting benefit from as well as a stress reliever. The Japanese have a similar ritual only with making matcha tea!
post #12 of 23

I"m not sure Bob is coming back. I just hope he's off experimenting.

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


Does that mean French toast is less caffeine than a blonde roast? This is confusing because I prefer a more robust coffee which I thought was stronger (more caffeinated) than a light roast.

Dark roast and light roast have about the same caffeine in them. It’s the more intense flavor of the dark that seems to make people think there's more.  Roasting takes out little of the caffeine but dark roasting does draw the coffee oils out to the exterior of the bean. This makes for the intense flavor.

 

A dark roasted bean has expanded so it’s larger and less dense than the lighter roast bean. You’ll need more dark roasted grounds to make a good cup otherwise it will be weak and, yes, less caffeinated. But coffee made by weighing the grounds rather than scooping them, they're the same.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtheman View Post
 

is it true that you need a burr coffee grinder to get good results?

 

The video seems to indicate that the tools shown in the video are good at either clarity or body, with a few inbetween. But that its a trade off between the two. I'm assuming I cant get examples of both without having multiple setups?


A burr grinder gives more consistent results and is better than a blade grinder in that sense. But someone down below uses a mortar and pestle to grind so I'd say your experience grinding beans and your own tastes will make the most difference.

post #15 of 23

Generally speaking the lighter the roast the higher the caffeine content.  Just about every coffee type and variety grown gets sorted after the Cherries are washed. A good example is Kona. You will typically find the estate coffees and Peaberry is a Medium roast and the most expensive. These also usually have the highest caffeine. As the beans get smaller in the sort you will start to see full city to dark roasts. Basically as the size of the beans degrade the roast typically gets darker. Of course it's a complicated topic with a whole range of caveats and exceptions which may grow significantly based on the amount of coffee you have had.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
It's a little disheartening that espresso machines are upwards of 2 & 3k. I was looking at some illy and lavazza coffee beans. It looks line lavazza is using a mix of arabica and robusta strains, and the robusta is added because they produce a nice crema but the robusta tend to taste bitter.

Yeah there is a local roaster in my area - charlotte. I live closer to hickory however.

I read that the chemex has trouble with heat retention because of the open top and ...I'm not really convinced this drip will be any better than my existing rival automatic cheap coffee machine. It's looking like a large portion of a good cup is the skill of the maker.

Right now I'm considering getting some good beans - which is difficult - I would need a grinder and from what I hear it's connanical burr or nothing .... Aka 200 - 500 usd
post #17 of 23

If you are looking for a good deal on a grinder keep your eye on the Baratza web site. They sell refurbs which can be a bargain. The inventory does change fast!

 

http://www.baratza.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=RFRB

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtheman View Post

I read that the chemex has trouble with heat retention because of the open top and ...I'm not really convinced this drip will be any better than my existing rival automatic cheap coffee machine. It's looking like a large portion of a good cup is the skill of the maker.
 

 

The problem with most cheap automatic drip coffee machines is that the water temperature that they brew at doesn't reach the 195-205 degrees that is optimal for brewing a good cup of coffee.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtheman View Post



Right now I'm considering getting some good beans - which is difficult - I would need a grinder and from what I hear it's connanical burr or nothing .... Aka 200 - 500 usd

Either a conical or flat burr is fine. More upper end grinders use the flat burr.

post #20 of 23

Y'all go and visit the forums at CoffeeGeek.com.  There they state that one kind of burr brings out raspberry highlights whereas the other burr brings out the chocolaty undertones.  And after all, you're all chefs with the sophisticated pallette sooooo I'll leave the decision to you.

 

As to the grinder, I use the Baratza Preciso that offers 400 different grinds and the burrs are replaced every 500 # or so of beans.  It costs less than $300 USD.

 

My coffee brewer is none other than the Bialetti Moka Express and no, it's not an espresso maker.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #21 of 23

Just a coffee story...

 

Many years ago my father, in the U.S.State Department, was posted to  Liberia, on the west coast of Africa.  While there, they became very fond of the local coffee, and on returning to the States, they packed a large wooden crate with Liberian coffee beans. It must have been five of six bushels. (He held the rank of Minister - just below Ambassador - so they could get away with that.)

 

They put the crate in the basement and took out enough every day to roast and brew.  It was months later that they realized that the cat had been using this nice setup as her litter box, since they had been a little careless in replacing the lid on the crate.

 

It was one of the great disappointments of their lives, throwing away 30-40 pounds of gourmet beans.

 

Mike :( 

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post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeLM View Post
 

Just a coffee story.............They put the crate in the basement and took out enough every day to roast and brew.........

 

How much time passed between roasting and brewing.  At the CoffeeGeek forum link that I posted previously, the "norm" is around twelve days or so to allow all of the carbon dioxide to expel.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #23 of 23

Well, we weren't nearly so sophisticated back in those days.

 

Mike:rolleyes:

travelling gourmand
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