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Are there any dangers with the flouring agent used to bleach flour?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I am starting to make dumplings, and one  type of dough calls for a certain flour that is "highly bleached," named "Hong Kong Flour."

 

I decided to look into it and wiki mentions that some of the ingredients are banned in the "European Union," that are used in "Flour Bleaching."

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flour_bleaching_agent

 

I am curious how much of a big deal this is overall, and since this particular flour is "highly bleached" I'm curious how big of a deal this kind would be in comparison?  I really like dumplings, and want to learn all about them, but I want to be as healthy as possible with my cooking.

 

Thanks for advice.


Edited by LasagnaBurrito - 6/13/16 at 9:16pm
post #2 of 4

Read enough and research enough and someone will tell you just about everything will kill you.  The "Food Babe" lives by this motto and makes a ton of money scaring people into believing that their food is killing them.  Personally, I wouldn't worry about it.  There are far more other things that are going to kill you before bleaching agents will.

post #3 of 4

It's important to consider a few things about Chinese cuisine. 

 

Chinese Cuisine values things Western Cuisine (as a generalization) don't. This means texture and mouthfeel includes things westerners may find disgusting*

 

So slippery is often a good thing to Chinese eater where it can be gross or slimy to a westerner. 

 

Texture is so important they treat starches in some extreme ways. Alkaline water for noodles for example. 

 

 

The safety of the flour may not be ideal, but should be acceptable as part of a varied diet and eating any one thing in moderation. As Paracelsus noted in the 1500s Sola dosis facit venenum  The dose makes the poison.

 

"Disgust is a very loaded word that can get into a person's internalized moral worldview. See http://people.stern.nyu.edu/jhaidt/disgustscale.html  If you found that interesting, read his book, The Rigtheous Mind

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot both.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

It's important to consider a few things about Chinese cuisine. 

 

Chinese Cuisine values things Western Cuisine (as a generalization) don't. This means texture and mouthfeel includes things westerners may find disgusting*

 

So slippery is often a good thing to Chinese eater where it can be gross or slimy to a westerner. 

 

Texture is so important they treat starches in some extreme ways. Alkaline water for noodles for example. 

 

 

The safety of the flour may not be ideal, but should be acceptable as part of a varied diet and eating any one thing in moderation. As Paracelsus noted in the 1500s Sola dosis facit venenum  The dose makes the poison.

 

"Disgust is a very loaded word that can get into a person's internalized moral worldview. See http://people.stern.nyu.edu/jhaidt/disgustscale.html  If you found that interesting, read his book, The Rigtheous Mind

 

What would be "ideal" in this case?  Not sure how many flours are bleached, and what their bleached content is compared to others.

 

I guess if you eat a ton of white bread it's probably similar.  As you said dose makes the poison.

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