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What kind of whisk should I use?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

I was looking at different types of Whisks to use for making my own dough.

 

I am starting out with making dumplings, but that in itself has many different types of dough.

 

I was watching this video

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOjPyAIzurw

 

 

and it mentions all sorts of whisks, starting with the "French" whisk which they claim is the one you should get if you could only have "1" whisk.

 

 

At the end of the video, they mentioned a "Dough Whisk" which I found here https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dkitchen&field-keywords=dough+whisk

 

but could not find on http://www.webstaurantstore.com/search/whisk.html?order=rating_desc

 

 

I'm curious if this dough whisk would be the whisk I should get, since my main purpose is dough work, or would someone recommend just a regular french whisk?

 

 

If the dough whisk is preferred, is there a recommended brand someone has?  I found this one with basically all positive reviews (best product reviews I've probably seen on Amazon too) https://www.amazon.com/Original-Danish-Dough-Whisk-Stainless/dp/B00HQQJ3N6/ref=sr_1_4?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1466089706&sr=1-4&keywords=dough+whisk

 

 

I wonder why Webstaurant doesn't have it.

 

 

thanks.

post #2 of 28

What kind of dumplings do you want to make?  You don't need a whisk to make dough you can mix it by hand, or use a wooden spoon, or spatula.  I only own two whisks a large and small balloon type.  To combine dry ingredients shake them through a sieve.  If I'm making rough puff for instance I combine my flour and fat in my food processor then transfer that to a bowl to add water and mix by hand.  

 

That video is silly IMO - must have been sponsored by the National Whisk Association.  

post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

What kind of dumplings do you want to make?  You don't need a whisk to make dough you can mix it by hand, or use a wooden spoon, or spatula.  I only own two whisks a large and small balloon type.  To combine dry ingredients shake them through a sieve.  If I'm making rough puff for instance I combine my flour and fat in my food processor then transfer that to a bowl to add water and mix by hand.  

 

That video is silly IMO - must have been sponsored by the National Whisk Association.  

 

All kinda of Dumplings :).   The book I have hsa all kinds of dumplings, buns, etc.

 

 

I'm interested in your comment about a "sieve" as one of the books does mention that, but didn't know it was for that (another book has a spider strainer which is used for deep frying stuff, so I thought the sieve was the same).

 

 

Can you explain more on what I would use the sieve for (will Google also).

 

Why wouldn't you want to use a whisk for the dough?  Seems like hand would be bothersome (I also have hand pains so not sure if that will be an issue with hand mixing).

 

 

What's wrong with the video, besides each step being another whisk...  It explains what they are, is there something wrong with that?

post #4 of 28

Here is whisk 101 help, free of any you-tube fluff, or any kind of internet fluff:

 

There a basically only two purposes for a whisk:

 

The first is to beat air into a liquid, usually cream (whipped cream) or eggs (genoise, meringues, etc.  This type of whisk has lots of fine wires, is sort of balloon shaped, and most importantly, you should tilt the bowl and whip from the "Corner "of the bowl to incorporate air.

 

The second type of whisk is constructed of heavier guage wire,  and is more tapered shaped.  This type is used to stir or incorporate ingredients together, ie whisking roux into a sauce,

 

 

Now get out there and cook! 

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post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 

I realized the first book I got doesn't say to use a whisk, and has a lot more dough oriented recipes besides actual dumpling making.  The other book I dnd't get to see the reason on the Amazon preview (will have to open my book up first), but the sieve was mentioned for tea making and said "To hep get particulates out."

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

Here is whisk 101 help, free of any you-tube fluff, or any kind of internet fluff:

 

There a basically only two purposes for a whisk:

 

The first is to beat air into a liquid, usually cream (whipped cream) or eggs (genoise, meringues, etc.  This type of whisk has lots of fine wires, is sort of balloon shaped, and most importantly, you should tilt the bowl and whip from the "Corner "of the bowl to incorporate air.

 

The second type of whisk is constructed of heavier guage wire,  and is more tapered shaped.  This type is used to stir or incorporate ingredients together, ie whisking roux into a sauce,

 

 

Now get out there and cook! 

 

 

So you would advise against the whisk for my uses as well?  I don't think I need to do either of what you said.  

 

 

You don't like the video either?  It seems there are a lot of different whisks, for different tasks, but from when you said it's either add air, or mix together.

post #6 of 28

Right - al lot of different whisks for different tasks most of which can be accomplished with a wooden spoon, and or a good spatula.  It was a marketing video nothing more.  I recommend watching cooking videos and not gadget videos.  Jacques Pepin's shows are great for learning technique as are Michel Roux and Raymond Blanc.  Also check out Chefsteps.com for technique and some great recipes.

post #7 of 28

You don't need a whisk to stir together flour, salt, baking pwdr, etc together.

 

A sieve is the best tool for this.  About once a week I make a big batch of buttermilk choc cake, the 30 qt Hobart sized batch...

 

I scale out (using a scale) my flour, hit "tare", add my salt ontop, hit "tare" add my baking pwdr, hit "tare", then scale out my cocoa powder ontop of this.  Now I lay a large sieve (which I get at a rest. supply house for the princely sum of CDN$ 12.99, featuring all s/s construction and NO, "0" plastic components) on top of a sheet of parchment paper) and sieve through once or twice.

 

This does several things:

1) It mixes all ingredients evenly

2) It breaks up any clumps.  Cake flour is prone to fine clumps, as is cocoa pwdr

3) It strains out any "foreign matter"

4) And most importantly, it aerates the mix, I've now added a more air. Once air in the mix is heated, it expands=volume

 

5)The mix is on a piece of paper.  I gather up the paper, forming a crude scoop.  I rest this on the rim of my mixing bowl and tip the scoop gently into the mixer.  No one milligram is lost in measuring cups, or is lost on the counter, or is spilled all around the mixer.

 

The dough whisk featured in video is Scandanavian in nature and is used mainly for batters like pancakes and waffles.  A stout whisk will do the same.  Remember to add wet ingredients TO the dry ingredients.  It is faster, easier and all around better to do this, since it is easier to thin out a stiff batter, than it is to break up huge clumps of dry mix swimming in a pool of liquids, and invariably needing to strain, making a mess, and loosing a lot of the recipie in the process.

 

Now get out there and Cook! 

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post #8 of 28
Unless I am making a huge batch of product (in which case a Hobart and a dough hook is helpful) a pair of good clean hands are the only tools I need.
I find it kinda relaxing to work and knead by hand.

Everything you will ever want to know about sieves https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve

mimi
post #9 of 28
Sorry missed your hand issues.
A whisk will be just as tiring and painful to use.
If you cannot tolerate the work try a stand mixer and paddle to do the initial mixing then switch to a dough hook to knead.

mimi
post #10 of 28

Ummm, just reading this thread over again.

 

 A dough is firm and has to be rolled or shaped.

 

A batter is fluid, and can be poured.

 

A stiff whisk will work well for batters, like pancake, crepe, waffle, Yorkshire's etc.

 

But I can't see a whisk being used for, say, a cookie dough, or bread dough 

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post #11 of 28

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 

Alright, I guess that a whisk is not really needed.  I should be okay with my hands, but someone made it seem like it takes a long time to make dough (I'll just take breaks if I have pain).  I'll go check out my books, but how long does it really take?  The book makes it seem easy, do you all agree?

 

 

 

So I just checked out the book and it recommends the whisk for "dressings and sauces..."  ugh hahahaahah...  I was confused, as I've never made dough before...

 

 

Do you think I would even need a whisk for dumpling sauces instead of a wooden spoon or something?

 

 

I should read these books, now that I got them, to make sure some of the stuff they suggest I actually need.. :P

 

 

Anyone use a fish/egg spatula? :P

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Sorry missed your hand issues.
A whisk will be just as tiring and painful to use.
If you cannot tolerate the work try a stand mixer and paddle to do the initial mixing then switch to a dough hook to knead.

mimi
 
 
How hard is kneading?  Does it take long?  Someone mentioned a mixer, but they seem expensive..  Not sure if it's needed though?  Thanks.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

 

 

Doing WORK!

post #13 of 28

Really you are over thinking this mixing thing.  For something as simple as a dipping sauce use a fork.  

post #14 of 28

I was just looking at getting one of these for "No Knead Bread" recipes.

There have been several threads on CT in regards to this topic

 

The "no knead bread" thread!
started on 11/25/14 last post 01/08/15 at 6:11pm 45 replies 750 views

 

I hope this helps you @LasagnaBurrito

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by LasagnaBurrito View Post

 

 

I'm interested in your comment about a "sieve" as one of the books does mention that, but didn't know it was for that (another book has a spider strainer which is used for deep frying stuff, so I thought the sieve was the same).

 

 

Can you explain more on what I would use the sieve for (will Google also).

 

 

 

 

 

 

@LasagnaBurrito

These two products would be considered "sieves", at least the the USA, not sure where you are located...

<edit...oops, missed the TWO products>

post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
 

 

 

 

 

@LasagnaBurrito

These two products would be considered "sieves", at least the the USA, not sure where you are located...

<edit...oops, missed the TWO products>

 

 

Thanks.  Sieves seem to be used to collect larger particles.. right?  Does dough clump or something?  What am I catching?

 

 

Thanks.

post #17 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hmm it seems that this first recipe I'm looking at calls for "1 egg beaten..."  Would I need to get a whisk for that then, or not necessarily?

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by LasagnaBurrito View Post

Hmm it seems that this first recipe I'm looking at calls for "1 egg beaten..."  Would I need to get a whisk for that then, or not necessarily?

You could, like team fat showed you above.

Or if it's a lot of eggs you could use a mixer.

But many of us would use a fork, or chop Stix, or a spoon, or even a bubbler spatula. The egg doesn't really care what tool beats it up.

In fact, a bowl isn't required either. A tea cup will do, or a small ramekin. S I said, the egg doesn't much care which is used.
post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post


You could, like team fat showed you above.

Or if it's a lot of eggs you could use a mixer.

But many of us would use a fork, or chop Stix, or a spoon, or even a bubbler spatula. The egg doesn't really care what tool beats it up.

In fact, a bowl isn't required either. A tea cup will do, or a small ramekin. S I said, the egg doesn't much care which is used.

 

I thought that was a joke pic :).[

 

 

I could use a chop stick, no problem.  I just want to be as correct as possible.  So it sounds like it doesn't matter how it's beaten, as long as you stir it around a lot?

 

Thanks

post #20 of 28
I suppose since you write about food, time spent researching all the kitchen doodads that COULD be used for various cooking techniques is vital to your success.
I own a dozen whisks and quite a few sieves (proper ones as well as not.... am at the beach and used a child's plastic sand castle sifter to bread fish last nite lol ;-)
Do I use all of them every time I cook or bake?
Heck no .... every tool and vessel that needs to be washed and put away means less time on the deck sipping a fruity rum drink from a plastic coconut lol (thank you party city!).
Like @foodpump pointed out there are a couple of things I use a wisk for and the rest stay in the tool container.

Does kneading take a long time?
Sometimes....if I am having a bad day and my joints are inflamed it seems to take forever to reach that smooth texture that tells me I am done for the moment.

Is making dough hard?
This can be answered a couple of ways....
The recipes are for the most part easy to understand and after a while ....memorize.
I s'pose if I had to make a hundred lbs of bread dough by hand twice a day the physical aspect could be considered hard (this is when the mixer and hook comes into play) but since retiring (for 10 months out of the year) I only bake what I want when I want and find it to be mostly relaxing as well as joyful.

mimi
post #21 of 28
Forgive me for asking a question that seems snarky... But have you never made scrambled eggs before?
post #22 of 28
 What am I catching?


Thanks.
[/quote]

IDK.
Have you had any contact with body fluids from a zombie?
laser.gif

mimi
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by LasagnaBurrito View Post
 

 

I just want to be as correct as possible.  So it sounds like it doesn't matter how it's beaten, as long as you stir it around a lot?

 

Thanks

 

BINGO!!!  Get the job done - Adapt, Improvise, Overcome, or as I like to think - "Be Water"

post #24 of 28

Lasagna, I don't mean to come across as demeaning in any way, but you label yourself as a "food writer" but so many of your questions are so extremely basic, what exactly do you write about?

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by LasagnaBurrito View Post
 

 

 

Thanks.  Sieves seem to be used to collect larger particles.. right?  Does dough clump or something?  What am I catching?

 

 

Thanks.

 

Did you catch my post, directed at you, informing you that "Doughs" need to be rolled out, or shaped, (therefore to thick to "strain", and that "Batters" can be poured?

 

Did you catch my description of how flour--especially cake flour, tends to clump together--even more so in humid conditions, and these clumps need to be removed (ie sifting) or they will form even larger clumps in batters, or nasty flour balls in doughs?

 

Did you catch my description of how liquids should be added TO dry ingredients, and that it is easier to thin out a thick batter than it is the other way? 

 

You need to try out all this stuff I mentioned to verify it.  Now get out there and Cook!

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post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
 

Lasagna, I don't mean to come across as demeaning in any way, but you label yourself as a "food writer" but so many of your questions are so extremely basic, what exactly do you write about?

I was gonna ask the same question. 

 

Edit : Whoops. Rep'd the wrong comment. 

post #27 of 28

If you say the word whisk more than 7 times the word starts to sound strange.  Whisk..... whisk..... whisk..........

 

It's just a funny sound now.

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post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

If you say the word whisk more than 7 times the word starts to sound strange.  Whisk..... whisk..... whisk..........

 

It's just a funny sound now.

 

That's the sound I like to hear when beating egg whites.  :)

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