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Deciding on new chef knives

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Been a follower of this site for awhile but finally decided to become a member. I'm just looking for opinions on what other would do in my situation. I think I narrowed my list down to some good choices so let me know what you would pick or give me some new options, anything would be great. Just a little background; I work the line at a restaurant in boulder. I'm looking for a chef knife that is 200-250. I prefer European handles but am open to them all. I am decent at a Whetstone but am also willing to take to a professional or a more likely scenario is to buy a edge pro. The most important thing to me for this knife is the blade, I am open to all types of steel even if the care I'd more then normal as long as it has great overall qualities. I need a knife that makes cutting 50 pounds of sweet potatoes feel like cutting through butter. My price range is 200-250. My picks are
Konosuke Fujiyama White #2
Masamoto 240mm Gyuto
Misono Swedish Gyuto 240mm
Misono UX10 Gyuto 240mm
MAC Professional Mighty Chef's Knife 9 1/2"
If anyone has any other thoughts please post them!
post #2 of 6

First, the TOP END synthetic stones cost less than the edge pro kit and can get you better results.  Like the Gesshin set is $200 https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/products/gesshin-stone-set  I would much rather have that than an edge pro.  Edge pro is cumbersome to set up, stones for it are expensive, and it can't thin a knife, hard to change angles, lots of problems.   Trust me on this and just learn to do it old school.  Esp if you are getting into this type of knife.  

 

From your list I'm guessing you were shopping at CKTG.  For the money you are spending you can get better.  They are really full stop the worst vendor I have dealt with.  

 

I have no vested interest in what you purchase;  no affiliation with any stores other than as a customer.  I don't care if you buy a tojiro or victorinox off amazon.    My experience is that there are so many great knives in your budget.  

 

ALL these are in or below your price range with better vendor support:  

 

https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/  - look at gesshin uraku, gesshin kagero, ikazuchi

http://www.japanesenaturalstones.com/ - itinomonn or munetoshi

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/ -most of the ones you listed are on here actually

http://www.knivesandstones.com/ - All sorts of tanakas , Kurosaki Syousin Chiku

http://korin.com/Knives/Western-Style-Knives_2  - most of their western knifes match your parameters.  Of the ones I listed this is the only site without free shipping but they have 15% sale right now that should more than offset shipping

 

Some people like really light knives and some heavier.  This list is kind of all over the place, the only thing they have in common is i think they are good performers in your price range.

 

Have fun shopping!  I haven't bought anything in over a year since I found my perfect knife.  Surprise it's a chuka bocho.

post #3 of 6
The Masamoto, Mac, and UX-10 don't have the price/performance ratio they used to, and the price range they current occupy is saturated with more good knives. If you do eventually go with Misono or Masamoto, note that the CKTG prices are noticeably higher than those on JCK.

Millions put together a great list of knives. I would add a slight addendum that it looks like JCK recently changed their shipping policy to $7 flat rate to anywhere.

Thin/thin behind the edge will help a lot with sweet potatoes, and the two best knives I currently own for that are JKI Ikazuchi and Itinomonn.
IMO the Itinomonn will want for a more sturdy stone edge not too long after getting it (it's *very* thin at the edge!).
Definitely a perk of sharpening for yourself- you can put on an edge that works for you without worrying about turnaround time of sending it to someone.
That $200 Gesshim combo set is pretty top of the line and is really all you'd need for years and years just taking care of your own knives, plus a flattening device.
post #4 of 6
I tend to concur with most of what MillionsKnives has said. All you need are two stones, one in the 800-1200 area, and a 3-4k.

A suggestion would be these Aogami Super with a stainless clad. Sounds like the good old Hiromoto, is not. Core much harder and more finely grained, micarta handle, good fit & finish. A bit thinner behind the edge as well, and a very regular grinding.

http://japanesechefsknife.com/DeepImpactAogamiSuperSeries.html#DeepImpact
post #5 of 6
I have been curious about those, they seem great for the price. Taking over the spot hiromoto had for stainless clad AS? Have you seen a school shot? 1.8mm thick sounds like laser territory to me
post #6 of 6
No. The 210mm has a 2mm spine and a clearly convexed right face. No laser. But thin behind the edge, and a very regular grinding. Price is quite a bit above the former Hiromoto level, but worth the difference, IMHO. Haven't seen the 240 gyuto yet, though. From the figures I guess it's much thicker.
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