or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › What tool can you not do without?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What tool can you not do without?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Just accepted my first sous position and im looking to build my "tool box"

Also, anyoneknownof a good sushi knife or oyster knife?
post #2 of 10

https://www.rmurphyknives.com/store/new-haven-shucker-pn-nhoys-details.html

 

Quote:
 The only one with a curved tip, a brilliant design feature, the New Haven is a superb oyster knife for a couple reasons. First the curved tip allows for excellent leverage when opening at the hinge and secondly the tip tends to ride high inside the oyster making it easier to stay away from the meat and avoid damaging it.

NHOYS-Logo 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #3 of 10

 Actually I've been to the r murphy factory it's in the next town over from my hometown.   But where abouts are you east coast, west coast, gulf?  New haven style is a great oyster knife for eastern virginica and the pacific northwest oysters (olympias, kumamotos).  It is too short for Louisiana and you want a sharp paring knife for belon oysters.  I can think of at least 5 styles of oyster knives each with their best use.   The best shuckers have a couple different styles of oyster knife. 

 

 

Sushi knife.. I am guessing you are talking about the yanagiba/slicer and not the deba. If it's your first one I recommend gesshin uraku or Korin white steel.  They both sharpen before sending it to you.  Yanagiba need to be 'opened' and if it's your first single bevel, leave it to a pro.

 

Kit stuff - knives of course but also

BIG spoon http://www.jbprince.com/utensils/sauce-spoon-original.asp for basting, flipping, plating

tapered saucier spoon

moribashi (long metal chopsticks for plating)

thermapen

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

It is too short for Louisiana

 

I grew up in Florida eating and shucking way more Apalachicola oysters than I could ever possibly remember and it worked just fine for me.

 

It was certainly not the first oyster knife that I ever used and over the years I have used a lot of different styles. However, ultimately it is my preference. Of course that doesn't mean that it is necessarily the best choice for everyone, just for me

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

 

I grew up in Florida eating and shucking way more Apalachicola oysters than I could ever possibly remember and it worked just fine for me.

 

It was certainly not the first oyster knife that I ever used and over the years I have used a lot of different styles. However, ultimately it is my preference. Of course that doesn't mean that it is necessarily the best choice for everyone, just for me

I use a Dexter of the same design.  I bought it at a hardware/bait store in East Point.  It also works just fine in Louisiana.

post #6 of 10

Are you guys going in through the hinge?  On big oysters I keep breaking the shell trying to do that so I prefer to come in from the side.

post #7 of 10
https://www.amazon.com/Dexter-Russell-Sani-Safe-S122-PCP-Pattern-Polypropylene/dp/B004NG98LE

I like the long narrow ones; I think it's just personal preference? They always need a little sharpenimg, though. I never learned to shuck any way but through the hinge; I think that:s why I started using these, because I was breaking shells too much with the wide ones.
post #8 of 10

It's a function of how the oyster grows too.  Farmed oysters that grow too fast can have weak shells.  Wild oysters will have a rounder bottom cup and they have time to grow stronger shells. They have to grow their shells to combat breaking, erosion etc over time and it ends up being thicker.  Wild store better and shuck better.  Farmed grow faster and more consistent. 

 

If my tasting notes says "high minerality"  it is code for the shucker broke the shell pieces in there hahahah

 

Worth a read on the different options  http://www.oysters.us/oyster-knives.html

 

New haven is a good choice for all the oysters I like to eat.  My favorites are all from the northeast.  I want brininess.

post #9 of 10

I use a Dexter and bent the tip in my shop after using a friends New Haven style knife.  For Wellfleet oysters it's perfect.

post #10 of 10

R. Murphy's oyster knives are the best. I use one and love it. The one I use has a different design, but they have several on the website.

 

For your kit/tools:

 

A good pepper grinder, I like Peugeot 

Cake testers

Small offset spatula

Meat fork

Large tweezers

Small tweezers for plating

Flexible bowl scraper (I use on my board for collecting/scraping chopped onion, etc)

Corkscrew

Microplane

Benriner Mandolin (if the kitchen doesn't have one)

Spoons (Kunz, etc)

Fish bone tweezers (spring loaded, natch)

Measuring spoons

Y peelers (the colored ones)

 

Thats all I got for now. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › What tool can you not do without?